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Lord Jim | [Joseph Conrad]

Lord Jim

From his many years on the high seas as a mariner, mate, and captain, Joseph Conrad created unique works, including Heart of Darkness, that have left an indelible mark on world literature. First published in 1899, his haunting novel Lord Jim is both a riveting sea adventure and a fascinating portrait of a unique outcast from civilization.
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Publisher's Summary

From his many years on the high seas as a mariner, mate, and captain, Joseph Conrad created unique works, including Heart of Darkness, that have left an indelible mark on world literature. First published in 1899, his haunting novel Lord Jim is both a riveting sea adventure and a fascinating portrait of a unique outcast from civilization. One long evening, over cigars and brandy, the seasoned sea captain, Marlow, recalls the life of a handsome young first mate who loses his ship and his honor, but becomes a god. As his friends listen and question, the powerful and eloquent story of Lord Jim unfolds. Joseph Conrad’s novels are timeless. The images he creates in Lord Jim, of man’s struggle to maintain a balance between morality and human weakness, have been echoed in countless other novels and major motion pictures. Narrator Steven Crossley provides the perfect voice to convey both the worldly-wise Marlow and the brilliant but deeply flawed Jim.

Public Domain (P)1997 Recorded Books, LLC

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3.9 (21 )
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  •  
    Dan Harlow Fort Collins 11-17-13
    Dan Harlow Fort Collins 11-17-13 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "The exact description of the form of a cloud"
    Any additional comments?

    " ...there are as many shipwrecks as there are men ..."

    Imagine, for a moment, that it was Brown's sunken schooner which makes its way back to the beginning of the novel and becomes the wreckage that caves in the Patna's bulkhead ("as though the ship had steamed across a narrow belt of vibrating water and of humming air"), thus setting the events in motion all over again. This novel would then be a wholly contained circle of doomed fate and circumstance destined to play out the same way over and over, time after time. Perhaps this is why Conrad chose to not only describe Jim as "inscrutable" but also to tell the story through Marlow - a story within a story so that Jim, in essence, more easily becomes us ("one of us" and, truly, "any of us") and Marlow becomes a sort of God who dispassionately watches us folly.

    The nested storytelling, the subtle wordplay, the idea that "three hundred miles beyond the end of telegraph cables and mail-boat lines, the haggard utilitarian lies of our civilization wither and die, to be replaced by pure exercises of imagination" creates an unreality that speaks to a truth of our own being better than if we were given an exact replica of Jim. Conrad gives us something infinitely better than an anatomically perfect recreation of a man who, for all the reasons and complexities that make a person a person, fails in his honor and shipwrecks his future - we get "the exact description of the form of a cloud" - a cloud in which we each see something different but is just simply a cloud - just simply us.

    Ultimately, for me, the novel was about chances, specifically the chances that are missed in life; the missed chances we always remember and can never let go of and forgive ourselves for. And Jim could have easily asked for forgiveness, too - his father, a parson, seemed a very thin analogy with God himself, a God who will forgive if only you truly believe in him, but Jim couldn't even forgive himself for the missed chance and for how he ruined his life.

    And I kept wondering about his father. Jim kept that letter all those years so you knew it pained him to turn his back on his family and even though he 'knew' he could never go back, he also knew that he didn't actually know that - he still held onto a sliver of hope, even if it was only a hopelessly romantic and boyishly nostalgic one.

    I wonder if what Conrad was also trying to say is that man is always doomed? There really are no heroes in the novel, in fact the best man we come across, the most successful man, Captain Brierly, just up and decides one day to jump off his ship and drown himself. Did Brierly see his fate clearly to know that he too was doomed, like Jim? Or did he know that if push came to shove he would be just as cowardly as Jim and he couldn't face it, not like Jim could? And how come the biggest bastard in the novel, Captain Brown, is most able to act 'heroically'? Is Conrad trying to say that heroism is born only from selfishness? From wanting to fill one's belly?

    While I don't know what Conrad actually thought, it seems clear to me that he felt it important to write an entire novel that makes you question the definition of morality, of honor, and of character. That's why Conrad created the 'character' of Jim because he could be any of us, he could be all of us, he represents every one of our individual failures and missed chances and misunderstandings. Jim is like the inner doll of a Russian nesting doll and each character in the novel is one doll larger until we get to the outer doll, us.

    However, I'm still unsure of what I think the novel was all about. Conrad plays such a literary master game with us that by the end I feel like my head is spinning. The language is beautiful but nonspecific (as Conrad always writes), and the "point" is unclear and open to really any interpretation - I have more questions than answers, but I love that he got me thinking about so many ideas.

    And this has been the most difficult review of a novel I've ever had to write because it would be like trying to recreate one of Steins perfect butterflies from far away based off of just the verbal description given to us through multiple sources handed out from the jungle 300 miles in and pieced together over a life time. I could spend my life getting caught up in this beautiful novel, constantly going around and around, like Jim, or like fate, or like all of mankind.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    brandon CONCORD, CA, United States 10-29-13
    brandon CONCORD, CA, United States 10-29-13 Member Since 2011
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    "A Bit of Beauty, A lot of Gibberish"
    Would you try another book from Joseph Conrad and/or Steven Crossley?

    My biggest problem with Crossley's voice work, is that he uses virtually the same voice and accent for the narrator as he does for the main character, "Jim". He should have differentiated the two voices, at the very least to show the sizable age difference between the two and to help make this book a little more understandable. This along with the meandering style of Conrad makes it a very hard book to follow.


    Any additional comments?

    There are some nice descriptions of places, people and philosophies but they are brief pit stops in this jerky tail. I expected this to be an action packed story, but any action that took place quickly lost momentum due to Conrad's erratic writing style.
    Also I didn't understand the necessity of using a narrator to rehash Jim's life. There also didn't seem to be sufficient reason for the narrator to have followed Jim around on his various exploits. Often times, I found the motivations of the narrator and Jim perplexing. Whatever point Conrad was trying to make, it surely could have been made in an easier way.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ian Farnborough, United Kingdom 07-18-12
    Ian Farnborough, United Kingdom 07-18-12 Member Since 2003
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Good - but not great."

    I have enjoyed previous Conrad works that I have listened to. This one too. But its not one of his best.

    It feels a bit like he had a collection of tales and characters that kinda sorta fit together but he couldn't quite come up with a story to unite them all. So he decide to stitch them together in a bit of a patchwork quilt. They are all interesting and well written and if presented as seperate short stories I would have probably enjoyed them more. The pace is slow, both in the original work and in the narration. There were several bits where I realised I had stopped paying attention and on rewinding to relisten realised that i had lost nothing from the story. The writing isn't exactly bloated , just a bit extended. If you are looking for a Conrad to start off on then "The Secret Agent" is a better story.

    The narration is very clear and measured - sometimes so measured that I checked my player to make sure it hadn't come to a halt.

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    James Hoholulu, HI USA 03-16-12
    James Hoholulu, HI USA 03-16-12 Listener Since 2008
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    "Could not get into this novel."

    Tried to listen to while traveling a long trip. Both my son and I found the early parts of the book seemingly discombobulated and turrned book off. Concievably we did not have a situation foor sufficient focus as the early parts of the book has multiple features linked to establish the story. I know the film -- that was great but seemed much more focused than the book. Conrad is a genius and likely the listener needs a quiet environment to focus on the story's linkages. My guess is that all gets well tied together in a sophisticated way by the stories end. The movied was powerful. Likely the book is also if finished.

    2 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    A Dog USA 07-21-13
    A Dog USA 07-21-13 Member Since 2011

    I exist.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Conrad Doesn't Always Stink, But Lord Jim Stinks"
    Would you try another book from Joseph Conrad and/or Steven Crossley?

    Oh yes. As noted in my headline, Conrad can be perfectly readable. _Youth_ , for-instance, is an easy enough read. So is, _The Duel_, and _The Brute_. Even _Heart of Darkness_, while challenging, is ultimately work the effort. But then there's _Lord Jim_. Saying it stinks on ice is entirely too kind.

    The first four chapters are told in conventional third person narration. They're perfectly fine. The last part of the book, involving Mr Brown, are very nearly a conventional third person narration, even thought Marlow makes a point of citing his sources. The last part of the book is also just fine and well realized. The middle of the book, however, is unreadable and is difficult going even on an audio book.

    Now, the middle of the book is not worthless. The bit about the Captain who committed suicide is quite memorable. The signal to noise ration is just to low. It's not worth slogging thru the endless bits of people telling Marlow who's telling Conrad who's telling us. It's a gimmick and it works poorly.


    Did Steven Crossley do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

    Crossley was perfectly adequate. Not great, not bad, but I wouldn't hesitate to buy another book narrated by him.


    What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

    My principle reaction to the middle of the book was "OMG, will somebody smack Marlow upside the head until he gets to the point."


    0 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-5 of 5 results
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  • Brocklebank Malcolm A V
    kindle FOUR
    9/10/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "I want to return this book but cannot find how to"
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    nothing


    Has Lord Jim put you off other books in this genre?

    no


    Who might you have cast as narrator instead of Steven Crossley?

    no idea


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Lord Jim?

    all of it


    Any additional comments?

    I want to return the book but cannot find how to do this

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
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