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Light in August | [William Faulkner]

Light in August

An Oprah's Book Club Selection regarded as one of Faulkner's greatest and most accessible novels, Light in August is a timeless and riveting story of determination, tragedy, and hope. In Faulkner's iconic Yoknapatawpha County, race, sex, and religion collide around three memorable characters searching desperately for human connection and their own identities.
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Publisher's Summary

Sweepstakes Offer - Will Patton's actual recording script can be yours, complete with autograph by the Audie Award-winning narrator himself! Get Light in August now to automatically enter for your chance to win.

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Audible is pleased to present Light in August, by Nobel Prize-winning author William Faulkner.

An Oprah's Book Club Selection regarded as one of Faulkner's greatest and most accessible novels, Light in August is a timeless and riveting story of determination, tragedy, and hope. In Faulkner's iconic Yoknapatawpha County, race, sex, and religion collide around three memorable characters searching desperately for human connection and their own identities.

Audie Award-winning narrator Will Patton lends his voice to Light in August. Patton has narrated works by Ernest Hemingway, Don DeLillo, Pat Conroy, Denis Johson, Larry McMurtry, and James Lee Burke, and brings to this performance a keen understanding of Faulkner, an authentic feel for the South, and a virtuoso narrator's touch.

As an added bonus, when you purchase our Audible Modern Vanguard production of Light in August, you'll get exclusive bonus audio added to your library - an interview with James Lee Burke about William Faulkner, conducted by James Atlas.

©1954, 1976 William Faulkner (P)2010 Audible, Inc.

What Members Say

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  •  
    FanB14 Rockville, VA, United States 05-15-13
    FanB14 Rockville, VA, United States 05-15-13 Member Since 2011

    Short, Simple, No Spoilers

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Perseverance in Face of Cruelty"

    Faulkner is a bit intimidating and difficult to process. I read several of his books in school, but somehow missed this novel. "Light in August" is undoubtedly the easiest to enjoy.

    In the fictional town of Yoknapatawpha County, Mississippi, the time period is just after the Civil War during a time of extreme racism while rebuilding. This theme is carried out by the main character, Joe Christmas, an angry man of mixed ethnic origin who doesn't know who his parents are and who rebels against prejudice, embarking on a murderous rampage as a cry for help. He's trying to find his way in the face of cruelty; committing unthinkable atrocities. The themes of violence, perseverance, and hope walk you through the story without judgment by Faulkner. You draw your own conclusions and are free to interpret as you wish. He is truly the voice of Southern literature.

    10 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Msaly1 09-05-10
    Msaly1 09-05-10 Member Since 2006

    Semi retired CPA, Sarah's mom, corgi mom, avid traveler, political junkie, somewhere north of ATL

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    "Incredible narration to a spellbinding classic...."

    I have tried many times to make it through a Faulkner novel, only to become frustrated with my inablility to follow the complicated (albeit brilliant) style of his writing. He and Joyce are the two greats that I have not read to finality with any of their novels that I have attempted. Consequently, I was delighted to see that Audible was publishing this audio book with Will Patton as the narrator. Having listened to at least a dozen of his readings, light dawned instantly that this was the answer to my predicament. I was confident that, with his assistance, Faulker would no longer be a puzzle that I could not solve. He would provide the roadmap to get me through the Mississippi terrain.

    I was not wrong in my expectations and I have not been disappointed in Mr. Patton or Mr. Faulkner. Each time I pull into my parking place at work, or into the driveway at night, I am disappointed that I must wait to continue with the story. But it is such a prize that I want to stetch out the experience for as long as possible.

    While I was not alive during the era he writes of, I can remember my youth in the South twenty years later. The storyline and culture are eerily familiar. The strands of human nature still woven into today's headlines. Mr. Pattons's voice is a welcome friend and contains not a trace of falsity to the Southern tongue. The story line is relevent today both as history and commentary. It is all here......and I cannot recommend it highly enough.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David Halethorpe, MD, United States 10-16-12
    David Halethorpe, MD, United States 10-16-12 Member Since 2010

    Indiscriminate Reader

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    "The "accessible" Faulkner: lovely, hard, and cruel"

    This is my first time reading the notoriously difficult Faulkner. I did not find Light in August to be particularly difficult, though it's also said to be his most accessible work. Faulker writes in a sort of sparse poetry that reminds me a little of Cormac McCarthy (though it's probably more appropriate to say that McCarthy reminds me of Faulkner). Faulkner is not as sparse, though; his prose requires a fair degree of sophistication to grasp and he weaves many, many themes through this novel, so I can see why he's considered a challenging read, especially in the era of YA ascendancy.

    I was captivated by that prose very early. I was prepared to fall in love with Faulkner. The first act of the novel is compelling: the simple tale of a naive young woman named Lena Grove who leaves home in pursuit of the ne'er-do-well who done left her in an expectin' sorta way, possessing an almost childlike faith that it was all on account o' him not knowin' the situation and planning to send for her anyway once he's all settled, so once she catches up with him, the Lord will see to it that they is married like a couple with a baby comin' ought.

    Yeah, right, and pigs will fly.

    While the writing remained beautiful and poetic throughout the book, the third act, in which Faulkner wraps up all his themes, ties up all the loose ends, and brought it all home, dragged to the point that I thought he spent quite a few pages just indulging himself in the portentous importance of his own ponderous prose. It didn't diminish the genius of his writing, but it did wear on me, as someone who has developed a much greater appreciation for literary writing in the past few years, but still prizes storytelling as an essential ingredient in a great novel. The flashbacks and stream-of-consciousness chapters pile on, never becoming less finely written, but I started to see why Faulkner is considered "challenging"; the book starts out as a fine Southern tragedy, but dumps us deep in literary Faulkner-land by the end.

    Also, this book is squirm-inducing in its beautiful and poetic rendering of the rankest misogyny and racism. The n-word abounds and yes, it's set in a time and place in which it would be unbelievable not to hear it flung about freely, but I found myself uncertain to the end just where Faulkner stood and what he was trying to say about his racially ambiguous anti-protagonist Christmas, who spends his life reflecting the world's contempt and abuse back at it. Joe Christmas grows up hard and mean and who can blame him? What I also found as horrific as it was authentic was the multi-layered hatred of all womankind, expressed through every single male character in one way or another, even the relatively sympathetic ones. Women in Light in August are the enemy even when they are self-sacrificing martyrs, oppressing men by the very act of martyrdom. I know it's fashionable to dismiss authorial intent, Death of the Author and all that, but man, methinks Faulkner had some issues with women. One of the most compelling passages in the book was the one explaining Christmas's solidarity with the unloving, hated adoptive father who beat him against his doormat of an adoptive mother who did nothing but try to comfort him. It was hard and true and ugly, and just left me awed at such prose that could fill me with such disquiet.


    “She is like all the rest of them. Whether they are seventeen or fortyseven, when they finally come to surrender completely, it's going to be in words.”


    This was really quite an experience. One has to have a taste for Faulkner, I think, and I suspect people will have wildly varying emotional reactions to him. I was drawn into Light in August enough that I will certainly read Faulkner again. 4 stars, because the prose is truly Nobel-caliber, but the story became abstruse and, for me, hard to love by the end.

    A fine performance by Will Patton, whose accent is Southern enough to be authentic without being so thick as to hinder clarity.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Patricia Frankfort, IL, United States 05-16-12
    Patricia Frankfort, IL, United States 05-16-12 Member Since 2001
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    "I tried, I finished it, but cannot recommend."

    I wanted to read a work of Faulkner's. I bought the Kindle edition so that I could follow the sparkling prose and fabulous literary presentation both aurally and visually.

    The story was good. The idea of the passages each character endured in his/her life was excellent. It was not especially unique, which was kind of good too, because there was a truth, reality about it.

    I just don't understand Faulkner's use of the flashback-flashforward structure in the telling. It was not difficult to keep track of -- well maybe a little with the names of Bunch, Burch, and other near-sound alikes. The individual stories were great stories. The saga of Joe Christmas was Dickensian if nothing else and the story of Rev. Hightower, while not as riveting as Joe's, was very good, very logical, very well told. I don't think the women characters were so well fleshed out. Lena was a single-faceted character. She had one goal in mind and she was tenacious about it, but.. shrug... so what?

    I am not a Faulkner scholar, so my opinion should hold little weight with those wishing to pursue this literature, but I am well read in many genres and many eras. I came away feeling Faulkner was a troubled man... turns out, after reading more about him, he really was a kind of lost soul. I felt the passion in the prose, but I had to work so hard to read the story/stories and to follow all the links between them, that it was tedious rather the pleasurable.

    I don't think I will read another Faulkner -- not by Audible or in print. Life's too short.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael winters, CA, United States 06-22-11
    Michael winters, CA, United States 06-22-11
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    "good narration"

    Will Patton did a really good job on this. I just didn't like many of the characters and when Christmas started beating a horse on the head, I gave up.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dr. Dan Berlau Irvine, CA United States 07-05-12
    Dr. Dan Berlau Irvine, CA United States 07-05-12 Member Since 2009
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    "Too abstract and wandering for most readers..."
    Would you ever listen to anything by William Faulkner again?

    This book has definitely turned me OFF of Faulkner.


    Any additional comments?

    The plot is too thin and the chronology is so complex that is doesn't translate well as an audiobook.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Yvonne Everett, WA, United States 09-11-10
    Yvonne Everett, WA, United States 09-11-10 Member Since 2002

    Educator with 7, yes, 7 different teaching endorsements! I am an avid reader and Audible allows me to double the amount of material.

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    "Revisiting a masterpiece"

    I first read this book back in college when it was an assigned reading. I liked it then but in my youth had not yet had the life experiences which made me love it as I did this time with Will Patton's evocative narrative. Since downloading it, I've listened to it twice through and every time I glean new insights on the human condition. The characters still live for me. Great job, Audible!

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    B.J. Minneapolis, MN, United States 05-30-13
    B.J. Minneapolis, MN, United States 05-30-13 Member Since 2007

    I hear voices. But maybe that's because there's always an Audible book in my ear.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Cross this off the bucket list."

    I've made it a LONG time without reading any William Faulkner. I decided it was time to cross it off my bucket list when I saw this had been narrated by Will Patton. The narration was first-rate, as expected. As to Faulkner ... it's not a fit for me. This was heavy, dark and dreary. A tough go. I appreciate Faulkner's gift for writing. It's singular. It's just not the kind of thing I want to read when I'm taking a break from the world.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Leigh Ann Hornbuckle TN 03-18-13 Member Since 2011

    horn

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    "Love it."
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes, I would recommend. I loved the visual created by the words. I very much enjoyed the language and dialect of the writing and performance. The story was a about a simple place and time.


    What did you like best about this story?

    The language.


    Have you listened to any of Will Patton’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    no


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    A young pregnant girl and her journey. Christmas and his story.


    Any additional comments?

    Highly recommend.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Leslie Grey McCawley Sydney Australia 07-08-11
    Leslie Grey McCawley Sydney Australia 07-08-11 Member Since 2002
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    "NOT "great literature" !"

    I wanted to like this, and to learn about the South from it. But I guess I have to just finally admit to myself that I am not sophisticated enough to appreciate "great literature". What I love and long for is a good story, well-told. This offering was so full of cruelty, hatefulness, anger, irrationality, and stunted, ugly human characters that I was left reeling, feeling sick at heart. For me there was no redeeming quality, at all, except that I have learned to strictly avoid Faulkner for the rest of my life! I would warn all sensitive souls away from this one.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
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