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Light in August Audiobook

Light in August

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Audible Editor Reviews

Having grown up in the South, the daughter of someone who wrote her masters thesis on Southern fiction, the idea of writing even a 300 word review of William Faulkner’s classic Light in August is intimidating, to say the least. In the South, Faulkner is a rite of passage, someone we all read in high school or college but certainly not since, preferring to celebrate our literary legacy through more contemporary “Southern fiction light”. Faulkner is just tough — it’s dense and wrought with meaning — classic literature at its finest, but not what you would call a beach read (unless you’re my mom).

And then I listened to Will Patton perform Faulkner’s Light in August.

Faulkner’s stories are written out of chronological order, in layers, in such a way that you might come to know a story over time from hearing it told by many different people in a place. Those who have studied Faulkner say when you get really caught up in one of the author’s page-long sentences, the best thing to do is read it out loud.

It’s even better to listen. With intonation, and the honey smooth cadence of Patton’s voice, the story is suddenly clearer.

Patton introduces us to Lena Grove as she begins her journey to find the father of her unborn child, Lucas Burch. Instead she finds Byron Bunch, who feels a strong pull to take care of her, though it puts him in an awkward social position. For guidance, Byron visits the Rev. Gail Hightower, a man so haunted by not even his own past, but that of his grandfather, that he has trapped himself in his own home.

Even before we encounter Joe Christmas, the 33-year old drifter of ambiguous race, the allusions to the life and death of Jesus are thick. There is a fire and a murder, and it all unravels from there. Patton’s voice carries us through it all, enhancing the story with approachability and authenticity. The Charleston-born Patton’s southern accent is true and real—not a touch of the theatrical, overdone linguistics adopted by some other actors.

In Light in August, Faulkner addresses themes of morality and race, religion and redemption — all too deeply to address in these few words. But he does it without preaching or judgment, leaving the reader — and in this case the listener — to wonder about our own stories, and how they might be told. —Sarah Evans Hogeboom

Publisher's Summary

Audible is pleased to present Light in August, by Nobel Prize-winning author William Faulkner.

An Oprah's Book Club Selection regarded as one of Faulkner's greatest and most accessible novels, Light in August is a timeless and riveting story of determination, tragedy, and hope. In Faulkner's iconic Yoknapatawpha County, race, sex, and religion collide around three memorable characters searching desperately for human connection and their own identities.

Audie Award-winning narrator Will Patton lends his voice to Light in August. Patton has narrated works by Ernest Hemingway, Don DeLillo, Pat Conroy, Denis Johson, Larry McMurtry, and James Lee Burke, and brings to this performance a keen understanding of Faulkner, an authentic feel for the South, and a virtuoso narrator's touch.

As an added bonus, when you purchase our Audible Modern Vanguard production of Light in August, you'll get exclusive bonus audio added to your library - an interview with James Lee Burke about William Faulkner, conducted by James Atlas.

Be sure to check out Faulkner's The Wild Palms as well.

This production is part of our Audible Modern Vanguard line, a collection of important works from groundbreaking authors.

©1954, 1976 William Faulkner (P)2010 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

  • Audie Award Nominee - Best Classic Audiobook, 2011

"For all his concern with the South, Faulkner was actually seeking out the nature of man. Thus we must turn to him for that continuity of moral purpose which made for the greatness of our classics." (Ralph Ellison)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

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  •  
    Kathy Davis, CA, United States 08-24-12
    Kathy Davis, CA, United States 08-24-12 Member Since 2008

    Newly retired, I am a reading fiend! I like many types of books, both fiction and non-fiction, with the exception of romance and fantasy

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    "Thumbs down for me!"

    I listened until 3 hours from the end and just could not stand a moment more. I found Faulkner's story depressing, unpleasant and mostly unbelievable. The timeline jumping happened without warning, and at one point, I thought I had started another book. The biblical, racial, and sexual bigotry, along with "preacherliness" of both the story and the narration, totally turned me off--so did Faulkner's creative word-play.

    Apparently, I am not sophisticated enough to enjoy or appreciate this classical writer. Luckily, I have found others whom I really do enjoy.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
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    Leslie Grey McCawley 07-08-11 Member Since 2013
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    "NOT "great literature" !"

    I wanted to like this, and to learn about the South from it. But I guess I have to just finally admit to myself that I am not sophisticated enough to appreciate "great literature". What I love and long for is a good story, well-told. This offering was so full of cruelty, hatefulness, anger, irrationality, and stunted, ugly human characters that I was left reeling, feeling sick at heart. For me there was no redeeming quality, at all, except that I have learned to strictly avoid Faulkner for the rest of my life! I would warn all sensitive souls away from this one.

    7 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dr. Dan Berlau Denver, CO 07-05-12
    Dr. Dan Berlau Denver, CO 07-05-12 Member Since 2009
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    "Too abstract and wandering for most readers..."
    Would you ever listen to anything by William Faulkner again?

    This book has definitely turned me OFF of Faulkner.


    Any additional comments?

    The plot is too thin and the chronology is so complex that is doesn't translate well as an audiobook.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael winters, CA, United States 06-22-11
    Michael winters, CA, United States 06-22-11
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    "good narration"

    Will Patton did a really good job on this. I just didn't like many of the characters and when Christmas started beating a horse on the head, I gave up.

    6 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    CHET YARBROUGH LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 01-09-15
    CHET YARBROUGH LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 01-09-15 Member Since 2015

    Faced with mindless duty, when an audio book player slips into a rear pocket and mini buds pop into ears, old is made new again.

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    "FAULKNER'S SOUTHERN VISION"

    To this reviewer, Faulkner, like Mark Twain, is an acquired taste. “Light in August” is considered by Modern Library, in their 1998 list, to be one of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century; “Time” magazine suggests the same thing in 1923 and 2005.

    “Abasalom, Abasalom” is William Faulkner’s vision of the South. It is an interesting book but it gnaws at one’s sense of completeness, both in the society being described and the fate of its characters. Faulkner describes early 20th century prejudice with characters that are largely unforgivable and unlikable. All women are characterized as dissemblers, and sex objects that lure men to sin as though men have no will of their own. Religion is exclusively seen as punitive and destructive. Faulkner pictures southern life as dark with only slivers of light; maybe slivers of light in August but only one month in twelve leaves his characters mostly mired in violence, sin, and despair.

    Faulkner draws attention to American societal failures in the same way his contemporary Richard Wright does in “Native Son”. However, Faulkner paints on a wider canvas; i.e. exploring the dark side of religious zealotry which has no north/south or east/west boundary. The irony of Faulkner’s wider vision is its narrow focus. Both “Light in August” and “Native Son” are difficult to read because of the brutality of their main characters but Faulkner, though more lyrical and broadly visionary, is ironically one-dimensional and less complete than Wright.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
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    Melinda Citron Agoura Hills, CA, United States 01-23-14
    Melinda Citron Agoura Hills, CA, United States 01-23-14
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    "Not my cup of tea"
    Would you try another book from William Faulkner and/or Will Patton?

    I would not be interested in reading another Faulkner book however I thought Will Patton did good job of narrating.


    What was most disappointing about William Faulkner’s story?

    The overly descriptive nature of Faulkner's work is lost on me. I find myself daydreaming or getting lost on what he was describing or talking about. I really hated reading this book but I kept reading in hopes that it would have some redeeming ending. Not.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
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    Paul winter park, FL, United States 09-27-13
    Paul winter park, FL, United States 09-27-13 Member Since 2012
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    "Amazing view into life 100 years ago."
    What made the experience of listening to Light in August the most enjoyable?

    The vocabulary of the author. I understood the intent of each sentence, but marvelled at the literary level of the written word. Not something you would here in everyday life now.


    What did you like best about this story?

    The depth of the characters and how they converged in life


    What about Will Patton’s performance did you like?

    The pace, the vocal manipulation and tonal flexibility in converying each character


    If you could take any character from Light in August out to dinner, who would it be and why?

    pass on that one


    Any additional comments?

    Very insightful of human value and perspective from this era.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Stevon Tempe, AZ, United States 04-22-13
    Stevon Tempe, AZ, United States 04-22-13 Member Since 2015

    I love books!

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    "a good reintroduction to Faulkner"

    I read William Faulkner or at least tried to read him in my 20's. I never really thought much about him after that until audible offered up this book as part of its Audible Modern Vanguard classic selections. The plot seemed interesting and I liked that it was narrated by actor Will Patton, who also narrates the James Lee Burke novels I enjoy, and since he's from the south where this book takes place, he had the southern accents down to a T.

    This is a thought provoking book that touches on several different topics. Since it's set in Mississippi in the 1930's, it is a timepiece novel looking at that era, post Civil War but where racism still existed even all those years later. But it also touches on the hopes and dreams of people who are just trying to get by in life. It touches on the effects our parents and even out grandparents have on our lives. Did we lead the lives our parents wanted us to or did we stay true to ourselves and lead the lives we wanted to? Was it possible to do both? How did our grandparents effect the lives of their children and how then did that get passed down onto us? Many of us rebel and strike off on our own but as we get older we sometimes think that we are leading the life we were supposed to and now we've gone full circle.

    Faulkner touches on all these issues in this book. Yes, it's a novel of the deep south in the 1930's but it is also universally timeless. I enjoyed this book much more than I thought I would when starting out. Read it slow and think about it, as i said, it's thought provoking.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Richard Delman San Francisco 02-08-13
    Richard Delman San Francisco 02-08-13 Member Since 2016

    I am a 65-year-old psychologist, married for 25 years, with two sons who are 25 and 22. I love reviewing the books and the feedback I get.

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    "Accessible to others; not to me."

    Not to personalize here, but I went to Vanderbilt, majored in English Lit, and read a number of Southern authors. Nonetheless, to say that this book is slow is an understatement. Molasses is quick by comparison. You need to be really into style in order to appreciate Faulkner, and frankly, I got over that in the late sixties. There may be a plot here, but I couldn't find it. I do really like the sound of Will Patton's voice, and have enjoyed a number of books that he has read. But, not this one.

    17 of 25 people found this review helpful
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    D. H. H. 10-08-12
    D. H. H. 10-08-12 Member Since 2013
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    "Suffering from visions meeting with reality"

    This is a master of the human psyche tells the stories of a number of different of human characters, many of which each of us has met in other incarnations. Faulkner gives us insights into what moves them. No explanations, however, as there aren't any. The discrepancy between their dreams and their reality brings to life many of my own memories. The least active character is at the same time the most realistic about what is happening around and to her.
    The reader is absolutely exceptional in portraying the different characters, their emotions and "southernness". This performance is a pleasure to listen too just to hear Will Paton read Faulkner.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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