We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
Herland | [Charlotte Perkins Gilman]

Herland

Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland, first published in 1915, is a feminist utopian novel that describes an isolated society composed entirely of women---a progressive, environmentally conscious land where peace and rationality reign and poverty is unknown.
Regular Price:$17.49
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland, first published in 1915, is a feminist utopian novel that describes an isolated society composed entirely of women---a progressive, environmentally conscious land where peace and rationality reign and poverty is unknown. Told from the perspective of Vandyk Jennings, a male sociology student who sets out with his two friends to determine whether Herland really exists, the novel ironically and pointedly critiques the arbitrary nature of many gender norms as it highlights the irrational features of the men's society and asserts women's fundamental capacity for reason and cooperation. Herland is a landmark work of feminist thought whose themes are as vital today as they were in the early 20th century.

Public Domain (P)2011 Tantor

What the Critics Say

"Herland is utopia with a smlle, a gentle, witty version of what women can be. As fascinating to women for what it omits entirely as for what it discovers and invents for us, it is a fast and invigorating read." (Marge Plercy)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.4 (11 )
5 star
 (6)
4 star
 (3)
3 star
 (2)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Overall
4.5 (11 )
5 star
 (7)
4 star
 (2)
3 star
 (2)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Story
4.6 (11 )
5 star
 (8)
4 star
 (2)
3 star
 (1)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    ESK Moscow, Russia 12-17-12
    ESK Moscow, Russia 12-17-12 Member Since 2011

    There are books of the same chemical composition as dynamite. The only difference is that a piece of dynamite explodes once, whereas a book explodes a thousand times. ― Yevgeny Zamyatin

    HELPFUL VOTES
    252
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    329
    58
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    34
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "It's a women's world..."

    I had been deeply moved by C. P. Gilman's chilling short story The yellow wallpaper before I decided to listen to this utopia. The book is a thought-provoking description of a society populated by women only. Women are the only moving force, being capable of parthenogenesis (the ability to reproduce without men). Having established a perfect social order, the women of Herland live a noble life using "a clear, far-reaching judgment, and a strong well-used will".
    By the way, the story is narrated through a man's eyes, who relates the events as an 'impartial' observer.
    C. P. Gilman brought up the issue of stereotypes that dominate society and questioned the notion of gender: What is equality? What is femininity? Is it "reflected masculinity"? What are gender expectations? And what should define gender roles? Being totally independent of men, had the women of Herland ceased to be women? Should we put an equals sign between 'motherhood' and 'maternity'?
    Certainly, C. P. Gilman had an unequivocal answer to these questions, but it was revolutionary back when the novel was written, in 1915. She pitted masculinity against femininity and ridiculed hackneyed prejudices and sexism.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Paul Z. Wixom, MI 09-10-12
    Paul Z. Wixom, MI 09-10-12 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
    159
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    327
    48
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    13
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Good Book"

    This is a Feminist/Socialist Utopia where the act of sex has disappeared, but don’t let that make you think it is a total downer, this is also a really funny story. While the society is inherently simplified, and rather…well, sexist, it is also light hearted. The author has an agenda, but time tries to win people over with honey and not vinegar. Hopefully you at least smile at the antics of the American men, and the superiority of the mothers of Herland. The audiobook starts off with a 54 minute forward that puts the work in its social context, I enjoyed this, but you may decide to jump over it.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michele Kingery COLUMBIA, SC, United States 07-30-14
    Michele Kingery COLUMBIA, SC, United States 07-30-14 Member Since 2012

    author of "Starfish"

    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    7
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Hidden Gem"
    Would you listen to Herland again? Why?

    Yes. It's not overly long. Really enjoyed the narrator and the story.


    What did you like best about this story?

    The strange story - three guys in a biplane in an undiscovered utopia of women. I enjoyed imagining the characters and the scenes. The story was a little escape (in the midst of my daily activities), to a mysterious, somewhat magical place. I found myself wanting to return there, again and again.


    Have you listened to any of William Dufris’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    I'm new to Dufris, but I liked him so much that I sought out (and purchased) another one of his narrations. He really animates the characters with his voice. I got a good mental picture of the world of "Herland" through Dufris' narration.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    I loved the way Jeff held the women, all women, in such high esteem. Terry was a big, blustery sourpuss of machismo. Haven't we all known a "Terry"? I found myself just shaking my head over some of his comments. You knew he was going to fall and fall hard. And he did.


    Any additional comments?

    "Herland" was required reading for a class I took, otherwise, I never would have known about it. Feel like I discovered a gem. I knew "The Yellow Wallpaper", but "Herland" was a real treat. It brought me back to when my own four kids were young and needed mothering. Those were pretty crazy, intense years, but "Herland" actually made me miss them, and those four little munchkins who are now very grown up adults.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-3 of 3 results

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.