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Brave New World Audiobook

Brave New World [Audiobook]

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Publisher's Summary

When Lenina and Bernard visit a savage reservation, we experience how Utopia can destroy humanity.

On the 75th anniversary of its publication, this outstanding work of literature is more crucial and relevant today than ever before. Cloning, feel-good drugs, anti-aging programs, and total social control through politics, programming, and media: has Aldous Huxley accurately predicted our future? With a storyteller's genius, he weaves these ethical controversies in a compelling narrative that dawns in the year 632 A.F. (After Ford, the deity). When Lenina and Bernard visit a savage reservation, we experience how Utopia can destroy humanity.

©1932 Aldous Huxley; ©1998 BBC Audiobooks America; (P)2003 BBC Audiobooks America

What the Critics Say

"British actor Michael York's refined and dramatic reading captures both the tone and the spirit of Huxley's masterpiece." (AudioFile)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.0 (6289 )
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4.1 (5181 )
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  •  
    Amazon Customer 09-17-14 Member Since 2016

    I value intelligent stories with characters I can relate to. I can appreciate good prose, but a captivating plot is way more important.

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    "Nowhere near as powerful as Orwell's 1984."

    Brave New World is often help up as being the partner of 1984. Both have different versions of dystopian futures where humanity loses its individuality to a faceless system that destroys independent thought.

    1984 stuck with me long after I read it, but Brave New World never touched me on an emotional level. I found it redundant, slow and boring. I also think that the book failed to make it's point.

    Huxley examines the world government that is based on control through pleasure-induced apathy, without ever providing evidence as to why it was a bad system. We're just supposed to take it on faith that it is. Art is gone, and passion is gone, even love is gone... which is appalling on its face. But that's a subjective reaction on the part of the reader. I love my family and I can't imagine being happy in world without families... but objectively, and undeniably these people ARE happy.

    What we don't hear about is the progress of the sciences outside of the sciences which support the system of control. Is humanity still exploring the universe? Are we learning and progressing as a species? In 1984, the answer to these questions was an obvious "no". Humans and humanity as a whole were getting stupider. In Brave New World we know they're being systematically cut off from literature and art... basically all the "humanities" subjects. But what about everything else?

    There is plenty to think about here, but while 1984 is a perfect 5-star book in my opinion, Brave New World falls short. Still an important read, and an interesting cautionary tale.


    6 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Alison Brinston, ONTARIO, Canada 01-12-14
    Alison Brinston, ONTARIO, Canada 01-12-14 Member Since 2013
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    "so much premise, so little plot"

    Ok, it's a classic so definitely a book with deep things to say. Generally I like the classics outside a classroom setting, but I'm just not sure this book was all I was hoping it was going to be. The first half of the book (give or take) is almost entirely consumed with setting the scene of a dystopian future (can you really call it dystopia if the people living in it are 'happy'?). I think the second half was supposed to be plot, but I couldn't really tell. There were a number of main characters, but none of them really seemed to be the 'hero' of the story, or even the focus of the story. There were tons of plot holes and loose ends, and some oddities in the society described (seriously this homogeneous society is ok with just sending the intellectuals off to a random island and hoping they never cause trouble? It just doesn't ring true to me) which betray this book for what it is: not so much a book but an extended discussion of a hypothetical future. It is an interesting concept, and one of those things that you can sort of see happening in a frightening future. Long story short: listen to it, contemplate the overall concept, don't expect a riveting plot.

    6 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    RichInRI 03-22-10
    RichInRI 03-22-10
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    "i did not enjoy this presentation at all"

    as a matter of fact, i couldn't even finish the book. having read the book in my youth, i was looking forward to experiencing it again, but the manner in which the book was read grated on me. as much as i tried to look past the annoying presentation, i found myself becoming more and more annoyed. to say he least, it was an utter disappointment.

    37 of 54 people found this review helpful
  •  
    T Cyr Missoula, MT United States 10-13-16
    T Cyr Missoula, MT United States 10-13-16 Member Since 2016
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    "Visionary Look Into The Future Via 1932"

    The story is well written, the reading is excellent, but this is a very difficult audio book to listen to and follow along. It clips along at a brisk pace and so many new concepts and ideas are introduced in such fresh terms, that it is difficult to comprehend what is actually happening most of the time. I was new to the story and knew very little about it when I began listening. I ended up researching it on Spark Notes to comprehend the plot line and who all the character were. Even then it was difficult to comprehend what was happening at times; certainly one not to be listened to while doing other activities. I think the story must have been so brilliant for it's time, and it is fun to listen to things he visualized for the future, now, and how they have morphed into or away from our current social norm. Loved this aspect of it! It's one I would have to listen to again to fully comprehend the significance of it's brilliance. This one will take some work!

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 02-28-16
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    "Awful Performance, Great Story"

    I can't help but think that every single character was NOT meant to be an awful, unlikable, whiny baby. Yet even the scenes that were meant to be angry sounded like a bratty toddler. I would recommend reading and not listening for this one.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    smarmer Los Angeles, CA USA 11-13-14
    smarmer Los Angeles, CA USA 11-13-14 Member Since 2011

    smarmer

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    "A true dystopian classic"
    Any additional comments?

    Michael York does a superb job reading this story.

    I listened to this after a binge on dystopian novels, starting with Fahrenheit 451, Darkness at Noon, 1984, and Brave New World. Of course I had read all of them back in high school, but each one came alive again decades later.

    Those who have a dark view of the direction of civilization at this time would be well served to read all four of these classics. Each one presages a different part of the slide into a potential new Dark Ages.

    For example, 1984 is a version of the esoteric negative side that can be found in Plato's Republic. Brave New World also partakes of aspects of The Republic, together with Huxley's prescient vision of the impending ability to control the genome and the mind via new frontiers in the neurosciences.

    In some ways Huxley is more optimistic than Orwell. Huxley's hero refuses to surrender and though he can no longer live in the Brave New World, he never capitulates. Poor Winston Smith, Orwell's hero, ends a broken shell of himself.

    I highly recommend all four of these to anyone who read them in their youth. They are urgently needed to be heard with adult ears.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jason FPO, AP, United States 10-30-13
    Jason FPO, AP, United States 10-30-13 Member Since 2016
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    "Great performance of this classic story"

    It had been a long time since I had originally read "Brave New World", and - as this title came up as a daily deal - I thought I'd take the opportunity to enjoy it once again.

    The story is still nearly as fresh and provocative as it was the first time I read it, albeit a bit tempered by the long years of reading and thinking about hosts of other utopian/dystopian societies.

    Still, if you're not familiar with this story of an engineered and conditioned society, it offers an interesting perspective on what it means to live a life worth living; and if it's been so long that it is only a faint memory, the theme and delivery still hold up and provide plenty of food for thought (and a fair share of pure entertainment, for that matter).

    There are very few mis-steps in the way of anachronistic "future" developments that might slightly distract you from the story, but overall the tale does not feel out-of-date and hold together quite well.

    The narration and production is superb, I can only complement the efforts of BBC Audio - the clarity of recording and the voice work come together for an excellent listening experience.

    If you are interested in utopian/dystopian speculative fiction, stories that examine what it means to be human and how we might accidentally subvert that, or just interesting "non-hard" SF, I would recommend giving this title a listen.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    ESK Moscow, Russia 07-22-12
    ESK Moscow, Russia 07-22-12 Member Since 2011

    There are books of the same chemical composition as dynamite. The only difference is that a piece of dynamite explodes once, whereas a book explodes a thousand times. ― Yevgeny Zamyatin

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    "Fantastic job!"
    Would you consider the audio edition of Brave New World to be better than the print version?

    What a blasphemous question to ask!


    What did you like best about this story?

    It looks real. That's human nature never to learn from your mistakes.


    What does Michael York bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    The narrator did a brilliant job of bringing the characters to life. He had no problem with the female character as well.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I loved every minute of it. And to Michael York's credit, the experience will stick in my memory.


    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 05-08-12 Member Since 2013
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    "Not for me"
    Would you try another book from Aldous Huxley and/or Michael York?

    Yes- I like to try to listen/read classics. This just did not capture my attention.


    Any additional comments?

    I feel a bit unsophisticated because this is the 2nd classic in a row I could not finish. I did not care about the characters and the story was not interesting enough to keep me listening although I did like Michael York as the narrator.

    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 04-19-12 Member Since 2016
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    "Orgy Porgy!"

    How did I not read this before? Michael York is great! The book is a little dated (some cringe-inducing racial slurs & oh the rampant sexism) but really is a hoot. (Where are our
    personal helicopters, anyway?!? Isn't it about time?}

    It did bother me how messed up John Savage is. That point of Huxley's I honestly don't understand.

    But I now know what soma means.

    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
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  • George
    Harrogate, United Kingdom
    8/6/11
    Overall
    "Marred by narration"

    Great book, no doubting that, but I'm half way through and had to break to come on here and say I can't STAND Michael York's narration. Really after 20 audiobooks or more from Audible this is the first time it's happened, and it's particularly surprising given he's such a well known actor, but absolutely every moment of his performance is over-egged. It's Jackonory story-telling, subtle as a brick and prone to spasms of indulgent and frankly frightening wailing and crying. And the accents, entirely his contribution from what I gather, are atrocious. I'm probably in the minority given other reviews here, but give the sample a go and try before you buy, that's my advice!

    25 of 26 people found this review helpful
  • Cross Stitcher
    NR. HALESWORTH,, United Kingdom
    8/4/09
    Overall
    "Sublime"

    I have never posted a review before, as I have never felt strongly enough, in either direction, to want to make a public comment on something - until now. It is more years than I care to remember since I last read Brave New World, and what a delight to listen to Michael York as the narrator. For anyone who thinks that they 'ought to' read this book, then this is the perfect way to do it; and anyone who wants to revisit this timeless classic, then you are in for a sublime 8 hours. If only all audio books were of this standard.

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  • Robert
    Outskirts of London
    5/7/16
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    "Imaginative, But Flawed!"

    Set sometime in the distant future (A.F. 632 which may translate to around 2540 A.D. according to some calculations), in an advanced dystopian world; this was at times a fascinating but challenging listen. However, I could not help feeling somewhat disappointed by the end as I did not find it to be the classic that it was alleged to be.

    Often compared to Orwell's "Nineteen Eighty-Four", but very different in terms of the worlds both authors so carefully constructed, I found Huxley’s style of writing at times to be overly verbose and difficult to follow. It also made me wonder at times how far he was trying to exhibit his own philosophical beliefs at the expense of the plot and overall story.

    I found nearly all the characters unlikeable. Naturally, the only ones I truly sympathised with were John and Linda. No doubt this was deliberate on Huxley's part, as to an outsider looking into this so called "civilised world" where people had been conditioned to show no real lasting unity to one another, you could only feel appalled at their self-centredness. John the Savage (as he was unfairly referred to), represented our world and programming, and his reaction to the likes of Lenina and some of the lower caste members and their behaviour was at times desperate, but understood.

    When you take a step back and take it all in, the world Huxley created here is truly frightening, but nonetheless captivating.

    Finally, I found Michael York's narration rather strange and somewhat irritating at times. Some of his choice of accents for the characters were quite bizarre and not well thought out (Bernard's and John's especially), and kind of took some of the gloss off of this work.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Peter
    Beulah, United Kingdom
    3/11/09
    Overall
    "Excellent"

    Bleak and excellent. An interesting thought experiment. As opposed to Orwell's "1984", in which a totalitarian government rules by fear and brutality, the Brave New World leaders remain in power by enslaving their population to unbounded, self-indulgent pleasures. All humanity is lost when grief, pain and suffering are eradicated, and the book cleverly introduces a 'savage' from an 'old world' reserve who understands the loss that the new world has undergone. Despite it's cautionary tone (that seems to be more relevant in this day and age than when it was written) I couldn't help feeling I could do with just a little bit of unbounded, self-indulgent pleasure. Huxley would turn in his grave!! Clear sound and excellently narrated.

    11 of 12 people found this review helpful
  • Sean
    southampton, hampshire, United Kingdom
    7/6/10
    Overall
    "Interesing characters and ideas of the future."

    Michael York makes listening to this book very easy.

    The story portays a world where human engineering has advanced so far that children are grown in test tubes rather than born naturally. Distinct classes of people are manufactured in the test tube. Love and partnerships no longer exist as everyone belongs to everyone else. Subliminal teachings repeat the mantras of the new world order, ensuring stability and conformity. Drugs are freely available to wash away any hardship or stress. Gone are the writings of Shakespeare and all references to God.

    But there are a few that are not content with the way of the world and look for answers to their feelings of emptiness.

    The story follows these characters through their journey of self realisation and weakness, exploring the state's reaction to their outspoken views.

    I really enjoyed the story and considering its age was impressed by the forward thinking.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Nick
    kings lynn, norfolk, United Kingdom
    4/23/08
    Overall
    "Better than a gram of soma...."

    Superb. An absolute classic! This thought provoking tale of social engineering is made even more accessible by the masterly narration of Micheal York. Sheer auditory pleasure!

    12 of 14 people found this review helpful
  • Mr. Antony Harris
    London, UK
    4/26/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great ideas, pulpy plot, hammy performance"
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    The performance and the plot.


    How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

    Fix the clunky dialogue and sketchy characters.


    What didn’t you like about Michael York’s performance?

    Hammy delivery. Wobbly regional accents randomly distributed. For example, Pueblo Indians that sound like they come from Bristol, my luvverr.


    If this book were a film would you go see it?

    Yeah probably, just to see how they do it.


    Any additional comments?

    Seek out an alternative version.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Penny
    BlackpoolUnited Kingdom
    7/19/10
    Overall
    "Memories"

    I first read this book 25 years ago at school. Time (or my age) has made this book even better! Well read by Michael York. If you like George Orwell's 1984, you'll love this.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • M
    Wakefield, United Kingdom
    10/15/12
    Overall
    "Parody not prophecy."

    This novel has to be read with the writer's historical context kept firmly in mind to appreciate its absolute genius. It's a parody - and a very funny one - of all the utopias being prescribed and promised by the political theories that are sweeping the world in that very strange period that was the 1930s. Capitalism was being battered - due to the Great Depression - and Socialism, Communism and Fascism were vying for dominance of people's hearts and minds; each declaring they had the keys to human happiness. And, alongside this, the science of eugenics seemed to be justifying the European dominance of its empires as well as the right of the upper-classes to rule the lower. So throw into this already very heady mix the hedonism of the Roaring Twenties, and the still very fresh memories of the Great War, and Alduous Huxley is writing in an extremely volatile time. So what does he do? He takes the piss out of everybody.

    We follow the petty proto-revolutionary bureaucrat Bernard Marx (what a great name: George Bernard Shaw/Karl Marx) in his pathetic and ultimately futile quest for respect and importance in the genetically 'stable' utopia that has been manufactured. It's a very uncomfortable read at times - the erotic play of the toddlers comes to mind - and brutal too - the death clinics, and the descriptions of the Savages' reservations - but Huxley's point is to show that no matter what the grand Social Theories promise, they won't be able to take into account each individual's little weaknesses and lusts and ambitions; humans can't be put into little boxes and expected to be happy. The Shakespeare quoting savage John isn't happy in the reservation nor in the Brave New World; the stunted Bernard won't ever find acceptance from his peers, and Lenina ("Wonderful girl; splendidly pneumatic.") will never be able to understand her taste for something 'different'. Huxley isn't being prophetic, he's being parodic in Brave New World and he's having a lot of fun too. 5 stars

    12 of 16 people found this review helpful
  • William Hayes
    Ireland
    9/2/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "what an amazing book!"

    I simply could not believe that a book as prescient as this was written in 1931 / 1932. This gets to the heart of so much that is wrong in our own era and reads like a creepy but amazing prophecy speaking into all the problems of our age.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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