We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
Beyond Good and Evil | [Friedrich Nietzsche]

Beyond Good and Evil

Continuing where Thus Spoke Zarathustra left off, Nietzsche's controversial work Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most influential philosophical texts of the 19th century and one of the most controversial works of ideology ever written. Attacking the notion of morality as nothing more than institutionalised weakness, Nietzsche criticises past philosophers for their unquestioning acceptance of moral precepts. Nietzsche tried to formulate what he called "the philosophy of the future".
Regular Price:$24.49
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

Continuing where Thus Spoke Zarathustra left off, Nietzsche's controversial work Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most influential philosophical texts of the 19th century and one of the most controversial works of ideology ever written.

Attacking the notion of morality as nothing more than institutionalised weakness, Nietzsche criticises past philosophers for their unquestioning acceptance of moral precepts. Nietzsche tried to formulate what he called "the philosophy of the future".

Alex Jennings reads this new translation by Ian Johnston.

Download the accompanying reference guide.

©2008 Naxos Audiobooks; (P)2008 Naxos Audiobooks

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.8 (191 )
5 star
 (67)
4 star
 (54)
3 star
 (40)
2 star
 (20)
1 star
 (10)
Overall
3.7 (122 )
5 star
 (43)
4 star
 (30)
3 star
 (27)
2 star
 (14)
1 star
 (8)
Story
4.0 (126 )
5 star
 (43)
4 star
 (46)
3 star
 (27)
2 star
 (9)
1 star
 (1)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Diverse Glendale, WI, United States 01-07-11
    Diverse Glendale, WI, United States 01-07-11

    bobh

    HELPFUL VOTES
    21
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Great Book, great Audio Narration"

    I won't drone on about the wealth of knowledge in this book. I will say i've listened to it twice since i got it two weeks ago, and i will keep listening to it. I find it very practical.
    -
    The narration and production of this book is exceptional. Like any book, it's difficult to read to others, and communicate the nuance. Jennings & McMillan bring this production through with excellence. Even Jennings tone, a slight snear, really plays well, because Nietzsche himself writes with a slight snear.
    Contrast this production with one i downloaded from "Librovox". Librovox allows non-professionals to record a book, and upload it. I downloaed Nietzsche's "The Gay Science", and i couldn't get through the first chapters. The narrator couldn't communicate the spirit and intent of the book. This production achieves that.

    21 of 22 people found this review helpful
  •  
    brennan Sacramento, CA, United States 11-25-11
    brennan Sacramento, CA, United States 11-25-11 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
    8
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Awsome"

    Great read, great narrator, interesting, thought provoking, and surprisingly funny at times. If you have never read any Nietzsche this is a good one to start with.

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John Oak Park, IL, United States 05-24-12
    John Oak Park, IL, United States 05-24-12 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
    73
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    65
    50
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    2
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "important classic with Ian Johnston's notes"

    "Beyond Good and Evil" is a well-known classic, so I will not review the work itself.

    The narration by Alex Jennings was excellent. He kept my attention throughout with his lively speech.

    And, Ian Johnston was more than a translator. He also wrote commentary which is included in this audio. The commentary is excellent: accurate and helpful for understanding Nietzsche's background and ideas.

    John Christmas, author of "Democracy Society"

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Wayne Irvine, CA, United States 10-15-12
    Wayne Irvine, CA, United States 10-15-12 Member Since 2009

    Mountain biking, surfing, skiing, literature, philosophy, psychology, theology and my ipod.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    38
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    122
    36
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    3
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Troubled Genius"

    Nietzsche's analysis and critique of false authority, master-slave relationships, herd morality, rationalistic/scientific barriers to living fearlessly are amazing critiques for the time he wrote, and flew in the face of the rationalistic zeitgeist of Kant, Hegel and science.

    His critique is very psychological, in that he does not himself present a rationalistic argument for or against his views (although he reveals brilliant thinking), but rather a series of observations/aphorisms which we automatically string together as his "philosophy" (and then wonder what he said). He makes scathing observations of the Jews being the cause of the despised master-slave relationships, and compounded by Christians. For sure, he despises weakness.

    Because of his own questioning of human motivation leading to the destructive master-slave devaluation of human, I find myself analyzing his own motivation for his concerns. While his interpretation of women parallels hatred of weakness everywhere, his misogyny, mistrust and devaluation seems embedded in every pore of his being, and explains most of his philosophy as a rant against how his mother (including father) treated him. He describes women as like a cat, they do their own thing, they have claws waiting to strike and are fundamentally manipulative and shallow.

    If my impression of Nietzsche's devaluation of human relationships (esp. with women) is accurate (his self/other esteem is relationally absent), then he is blind and in contempt (indignant) of any relational resolution to his existential predicament. His primary target therefore is anyone who presents a threat to him, his thinking, his power/right to live fully.

    More interestingly, this theory helps explain the either/or, master/slave position which he takes as the truth of the human condition. Since psyche (which is conditioned by society he states)/people/society/ bad philosophers/scientists/politics/countries are not to be trusted, the first goal is to avoid being a slave of your own weak conscience or that of anyone else's, have the courage to be master of your own soul, and do not be afraid of your passions/instincts/impulses, but let them give you instinctive taste/guidance, power, freedom of will, nobility--not made weak by conscience.

    His use of the term "Truth" is almost always stated in some disdainful way against others, especially philosopher metaphysicians who go around telling others what "Truth" is. His effort is to invert this terrible misconception, and restore the meaning of truth as ones own Will to Truth (which becomes Will to Power), the power to be who you are based on your own value. The ultimate truth in life is thus to embrace the value of your own power. He often speaks positively of artists who engage in their expressive, empowered freedom in life (i.e., Wagner).


    He states that "all organic functions [including sexuality] could be traced back to this Will to Power" (36)--this is his claim about reality/truth. There are thus two reading of Nietzsche--the amoral, harsh, cynical, heartlessness, and the one that some of us would like to believe: that his thoughts just haven't been developed clearly and that he is more artistic in his nature (and that Santa Claus and Heaven are not in jeopardy). It is not hard to see why his ideas became usable for Hitler's regime. We can thank subsequent philosophers who salvaged his genius out of his darkness.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeffrey Pennant Hills, Australia 04-02-12
    Jeffrey Pennant Hills, Australia 04-02-12 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Nietzsche Remains Utterly Opaque"
    Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

    Definitely worth listening to, if only to see what the fuss is all about. I really wanted to find out exactly what he had against god - but I remain confused.


    What could Friedrich Nietzsche have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

    He could have outlined a proposition, presented arguments to support it, argued against contrary arguments, and then made a killer conclusion. Sadly, he did none of these.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    n/a


    Could you see Beyond Good and Evil being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

    Oh dear dog, no. Maybe Monty Python could do a satire of it - but it already satirises itself, so they'd have precious little to do.


    Any additional comments?

    This book is written entirely as a series of numbered aphorisms, none appearing to have any relationship to any of the others. In each case I understood every word, understood the grammar and syntax, yet when it finished I had no idea at all what it was about. He remained completely and utterly inaccessible (to me).
    Boy! Those Prussians sure didn't like the Jews, did they! I see where Adolf got it from.
    This audiobook was well-presented and read in a pleasant voice - yet Nietzche's prose remains thick and turgic beyond the point of incomprehensibility.

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Christopher San Antonio, TX, United States 04-29-11
    Christopher San Antonio, TX, United States 04-29-11
    HELPFUL VOTES
    18
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    3
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "This was not what I expected..."

    I'm not sure what I expected from Nietzsche, but it most certainly wasn't a constantly contradictory, self-pitying diatribe about how all of the problems in the world are everyone elses fault and how Nietzsche, himself, is some sort of advance guard for a super-awesome totally kick-ass mega race of philosopher kings who need to be put in charge of everything because they are our superiors and we are just herd animals waiting to be led by them!

    Nietzsche take perfectly logical presumptions- like "there is no singular morality"- and twists them into value judgments- like "there is no singular morality, therefore some morality must be superior morality and some inferior morality, and the inferior people who have inferior morality must subjugate themselves to the superior". WTF?!

    In the end, Nietzsche falls prey to the brier patch of the small minded- the absolute. If a man is not one way, he must then be the absolute opposite, if a man does not completely believe one thing, he must completely believe the absolute opposite, if a man is not a master, then he must be a slave. And all the while condemning this very act in others.

    Over and over again, Nietzsche takes reasonable, and sometimes very wise, ideas and twists them to fuel his own self-gratification and sense of superiority.

    It is important to read Nietzsche to understand the kind of childlike thinking that we must avoid in ourselves. Of course, if Nietzsche wrote this as a satire and is laughing at us from the grave (like Machiavelli), then I take all of this back. If that is the case the man has done us the great favor of giving us a glimpse into our own, darkest nature.

    18 of 44 people found this review helpful
  •  
    norma trusiewicz 04-16-14
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    4
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "How Did this book stand the test of time?"
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    An intelligent man writing his musings about life in no particular order, with no particular aim except perhaps the theme of criticizing the teachings of other philosophers. Powerful logic, but needs overall purpose. Probably achieved fame by continually referring to and mocking the work of the powerful players of his time.


    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dave Hedley San Mateo, CA United States 02-21-14
    Dave Hedley San Mateo, CA United States 02-21-14 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
    28
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    199
    53
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    3
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Disappointing"

    The most modern part of me is very surprised at the deference paid to Nietzsche. Perhaps I'm not understanding him. Perhaps he is less clever than he believes himself to be. There are many grand assertions that are not at all proven. His dependence on a particular view of what the basic nature of "man" is, is a distinct weakness. Nietzsche would likely scoff at my call to science to disprove his truth, yet, there it is. What we know, now, of how the human brain works tends to disprove the thesis of the basic nature of man being that of power and dominance. We are more of a cooperative species than Nietzsche might allow. I would have liked him to engage more directly Mills, et al., rather than be so rude and dismissive. It gives little weight to an argument, when you simply dismiss those you disagree with rather than a clear refutation of their arguments. Not sorry I read it, have not found this particularly enlightening. I was glad to see the he was not the anti-Semite of which he has been accused by his critics.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael Sydney, Australia 10-19-12
    Michael Sydney, Australia 10-19-12 Member Since 2007

    Classics, history, historical fiction, marketing, Napoleonic stuff and of course 'Boys own Adventure'. This is my bent. Occasional self help as well.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    132
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    350
    158
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    18
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Not an easy listen to."
    Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

    This book needs to be studied and discussed. It is no easy listen to whilst commuting to work. I would not recommend it as entertainment.


    What do you think your next listen will be?

    Something totally different, perhaps light entertainment like a Flashman book or the new narrated book by Dustin Hoffman, 'Being There'.


    Have you listened to any of Alex Jennings and Roy McMillan ’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    I don't think so, but they are excellent in their performance from this book.


    Was Beyond Good and Evil worth the listening time?

    I am not smart enough to appreciate it. Would need to spend more time discussing and studying it to get the benefit from it. I understand the Nazi used Nietzeche to back up their weird ideas, so if you like to study that part of history, it might be a good resource. For me, it was unfortunately a waste of time.


    Any additional comments?

    Interesting, nothing like the communist manifesto, or the great thinkers from the age of enlightenment but important as it did have an influence on the 20th Century. Not my 'cup-of-tea'.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    LyteWeaver Eagleby, Australia 12-16-11
    LyteWeaver Eagleby, Australia 12-16-11 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    5
    5
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Inspiring and educational."
    If you could sum up Beyond Good and Evil in three words, what would they be?

    I am not much of a critic but i found this book extremely inspiring and very educational. The narrator is a little boring and tends to put me to sleep but apart from that it was great in my opinion.


    What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

    it was more so the information that i found compelling, rather than the narration.


    Which character – as performed by Alex Jennings and Roy McMillan – was your favorite?

    both we ok but very still put me to sleep. i will have to listen to it again to properly answer this question. i could say this about most narrators as they tend to almost sound like they are speaking in the same tone without much expression.


    If you could give Beyond Good and Evil a new subtitle, what would it be?

    i think the subtitle was well suited.


    Any additional comments?

    i must have another listen and try to stay awake to give a better opinion. sorry about that.

    0 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-10 of 10 results

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.