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Arrowsmith | [Sinclair Lewis]

Arrowsmith

Martin Arrowsmith is fascinated by science and medicine. As a boy, he immerses himself in Gray’s Anatomy. In medical school, he soaks up knowledge from his mentor, a renowned bacteriologist. But soon he is urged to focus on politics and promotions rather than his research. Even as Martin progresses from doctor to public health official and noted pathologist, he still yearns to devote his time to pure science.
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Audible Editor Reviews

This 1924 classic traces the less than satisfying career of a doctor from his college training through his small-town practice, participation in a city health agency, and work in a West Indian clinic, where he hopes to engage in pure science and escape the money-grubbing that has so frustrated him earlier. Sinclair Lewis won the Pulitzer Prize for Arrowsmith but refused it, out of pique, some critics suggest, because he felt he should have won it for his earlier novels. The novel still makes good listening today, in large measure because of the competence of narrator John McDonough. Though he could use a little more drama and more consistent differentiation among the many characters, his style eventually becomes as compelling as the novel itself.

Publisher's Summary

The son of a country doctor, Sinclair Lewis turned to writing instead of medicine. He won the Nobel Prize in 1930. Arrowsmith was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Literature. This is the story of a brilliant young man who dedicates his life to science, yet finds that corruption, not disease, is his greatest foe.

Martin Arrowsmith is fascinated by science and medicine. As a boy, he immerses himself in Gray’s Anatomy. In medical school, he soaks up knowledge from his mentor, a renowned bacteriologist. But soon he is urged to focus on politics and promotions rather than his research. Even as Martin progresses from doctor to public health official and noted pathologist, he still yearns to devote his time to pure science.

Published in 1924, this novel had a profound effect on the reading public. As an expose of professional greed and fraud, it was a call to scrutinize flawed medical practices. Now, through John McDonough’s vibrant narration, it is a truly notable audiobook.

Public Domain (P)2001 Recorded Books, LLC

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  •  
    Stephen 09-08-13
    Stephen 09-08-13 Member Since 2012
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    "Arrowsmith - The Classic Book, Not the Band"

    Book: In general, I do not comment on classics. However, I found the story interesting since it draws from the history in the US from 100 years ago: Pre-WWI, midwest, industrialization of the economy, the movement of most of the population from the farm to the city, etc - all the changes - economic, political, social, etc. I liked it but if you were looking for fast moving book, this is not it. However, if want to see changes in personalities and slices of social groups, it is interesting with great wording and character development. I sure it won the Noble Prize for Literature for its social-political aspect, in part, but it is a very good piece of literature.

    Performance: The reader was very good. In time, I forgot there was reader and toward the end of the book the reader acted some of the characters well out.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Forrest 02-26-12
    Forrest 02-26-12 Member Since 2009

    Say something about yourself!

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Still Relevant"

    I am going to medical school next year and was told to read this book by several people. It was startling that so many of the issues that face the modern doctor had already been clearly outlined almost 90 years ago. This book was particularly interesting to me after reading several nonfiction books describing medical science in the same era like "The Demon under the Microscope" and "The Great Influenza". Although the moral dilemmas are complex and interesting, Lewis does not achieve that same complexity in his characters and their actions.

    7 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    P. Giorgio Illinois 01-14-14
    P. Giorgio Illinois 01-14-14 Member Since 2001

    TheWriter

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    "Boring but readable"

    So this kid from the hinterlands decides to become a doctor. He goes through the trials and tribs of youth, early love, rejection. He hitches his academic wagon to the wrong stars on occasion. He finds the right woman who supports him and his quest for a medical degree and a position to work in science. He fails miserably more than once. He capitulates to corporate greed, the woman's parents, the expectations of society all before he wakes up --too late-- and has to start all over again.

    If this was a jab at the education of a medical professional, it seems weak today. The writing was strong, the characters well defined, their foibles and power well explored and delineated. Poor Martin Arrowsmith, however, was drawn without much spine, and less imagination than his costars.

    Not sure why this is a "classic" except for its year, and the fact that Sinclair Lewis also wrote Elmer Gantry, but it is an adequate portrait of early 20th century, pre-WWII America. There are some attacks at militarism, at corporate medical practices, at academia, etc., but it's not a diatribe and it is also not a deep read.

    I am taking on Elmer Gantry later, but I feel I've already seen into that book through Lewis' sweep of American immorality in this book. Elmer Gantry SHOULD be preachy; Arrowsmith was as well.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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