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All Quiet on the Western Front | [Erich Maria Remarque]

All Quiet on the Western Front

Paul Bäumer is just 19 years old when he and his classmates enlist. They are Germany’s Iron Youth who enter the war with high ideals and leave it disillusioned or dead. As Paul struggles with the realities of the man he has become, and the world to which he must return, he is led like a ghost of his former self into the war’s final hours. All Quiet is one of the greatest war novels of all time, an eloquent expression of the futility, hopelessness and irreparable losses of war.
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Publisher's Summary

Paul Bäumer is just 19 years old when he and his classmates enlist. They are Germany’s Iron Youth who enter the war with high ideals and leave it disillusioned or dead. As Paul struggles with the realities of the man he has become, and the inscrutable world to which he must return, he is led like a ghost of his former self into the war’s final hours. All Quiet is one of the greatest war novels of all time, an eloquent expression of the futility, hopelessness and irreparable losses of war.

©1958 Erich Maria Remarque (P)1994 Recorded Books, LLC

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  •  
    Charles 11-14-12
    Charles 11-14-12
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Gruesome impact of war"

    The book details the life of a soldier enduring trench warfare. While this style of war is unlikely to be carried out on a large scale in the future, the psychological impact of war and the suffering of the individual are important issues that should be considered.

    The enduring life of this book is evidence of the effective story telling.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Nothing really matters Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 04-04-15
    Nothing really matters Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 04-04-15 Member Since 2014

    Rob Thomas

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "You think war is all glory, but it is all hell."

    This book moved me in the way the movie “Saving Pvt. Ryan” did (especially that movie’s initial D-Day scene). There are countless war movies and books, but these are the only two I am familiar with that were capable of bringing home the horror of war. My father fought in WWII and never told war stories or even talked about combat other than in vague ways. In his view war was a senseless “meat grinder”. I never felt I knew what he was getting at until after I'd seen Saving Pvt. Ryan and read “All Quiet on the Western Front”.

    All Quiet is written by a WWI combat veteran and tells tells the story of Paul Baumer who, along with his classmates is encouraged to join the war with a great deal of patriotic talk by those who, by virtue of their age or position, need never fight themselves. Paul soon discovers that, as U.S. Gen. Sherman said:

    "I am tired and sick of war. Its glory is all moonshine. It is only those who have neither fired a shot nor heard the shrieks and groans of the wounded who cry aloud for blood, for vengeance, for desolation. War is hell."

    and

    "There is many a boy here today who looks on war as all glory, but, boys, it is all hell."

    I finished this book thinking, for mankind to evolve, wars should simply be banned (or, as suggested by Paul and his comrades, turned into life-and-death tournaments between the world leaders and generals who declare them).

    The narrator is perfect and really does the material justice. And the writing itself is beautiful. Unreservedly recommended. A+

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Netta SAN JOSE, CA, United States 10-08-12
    Netta SAN JOSE, CA, United States 10-08-12 Member Since 2012

    CoolDude#2

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    "Gripping and Sad"
    Would you consider the audio edition of All Quiet on the Western Front to be better than the print version?

    The excellent reading just flows, whereas reading this very sad material would have been hard to go through in print form.


    What about Frank Muller’s performance did you like?

    Muller's reading is not overly dramatic.


    Who was the most memorable character of All Quiet on the Western Front and why?

    The protagonist, Paul, is a sensitive, tender boy, turned into a hardened soldier. He also gives us a short glimpse to his life away from the front. The juxtaposition of these two extremes makes the reader feel more intensely the hardships of WW1.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Donna Lachman 04-19-12 Member Since 2014

    lock80

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    "A sad story of death"
    Would you listen to All Quiet on the Western Front again? Why?

    This book along with other like Born of the 4th of July should be required reading before enlisting. The story is memorable. This story is a sad but seemingly true sense of war, loss of life and hardships along the way. This story reminds us that we are all men who are dying. The differences between us and them become blured and the cause or meaning of the war become lost.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ryan Somerville, MA, United States 09-19-14
    Ryan Somerville, MA, United States 09-19-14 Member Since 2005

    Gen-Xer, software engineer, and lifelong avid reader. Soft spots for sci-fi, fantasy, and history, but I'll read anything good.

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    "Still powerful"

    Though not a long book, All Quiet on the Western Front is the prototype for nearly every modern novel about going to war. Young men with their heads crammed full of patriotism and dreams of glory volunteer for the army. There is a strenuous boot camp with a martinet drill instructor. Then the horror and carnage of battle, which often amounts to hunkering down and hoping not to be hit by shells fired by a far-off enemy, while nearby comrades are randomly cut down by shrapnel, explosive, bullets, and poison gas, sometimes to die hideous, lingering deaths.

    The story is told through the eyes of Paul Bäumer, an everyman character whom Remarque never defines in much depth -- though part of this is the conceit that Paul, at 19, sees himself as a person who was unformed before war claimed him. The novel, written in the immediate tense, reads more as a series of fragmentary scenes and impressions than an ordered narrative, which might put off some readers, but I think this adds to its effectiveness. Over the course of the novel, Paul and his companions experience all the usual responses to modern war. There's horror, disillusionment, shell shock, and alienation from the civilian world, with its self-satisfied values and artificial lives. To Paul, the ability to care about the things that his student self once cared about is lost, the only meaning now in small, primal acts of life and in his comrades-in-arms.

    The prose is haunted by bleakness and despair, though there are some scenes that are quite beautiful in their melancholy humanity, such as Paul's visit to a camp of Russian POWs, or of his regrets after being trapped in a shell hole for a few hours with a dying enemy soldier, who, now disarmed, is little different from himself. There are a few moments of levity, such a scene where a pompous teacher gets his just desserts, but they're few. For their part, the sequences set in the trenches are rich in images of dull, hellish squalor, such as passing time by killing ever-present corpse-fed rats, or the cries of a wounded man slowly dying somewhere out in No Man's Land. Yes, no surprise that the Nazis banned this one for "defeatism" (and got to relive it all at Stalingrad).

    Though the specific causes of World War One are now buried in the dustbin of history, the reader doesn't need to be familiar with them to grasp the essential themes. All Quiet on the Western Front still maintains its timeless message of youth pointlessly squandered by the impenetrable stupidity of politics. When Paul's companions discuss the reasons they've been sent to fight and die, they can only observe that they never had anything against the French, nor the average French soldier against Germany, but, as always, the few people who make and benefit from policy aren't the ones deemed young and physically fit enough to die for it. While no 21st century generation is likely to experience the kind of wholesale meat-grinder warfare that could wipe out thirty thousand lives in one battle, we shouldn't forget the naivete that led to it, or the callousness it inflicted. These are aspects of modernity that have hardly left the world, even a century later.

    Audiobook narrator Frank Muller gives a restrained but haunted reading that fits the spirit of the text well.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    michele Lancaster, OH, United States 12-03-13
    michele Lancaster, OH, United States 12-03-13 Member Since 2013

    I am a working mom who loves to squeeze in listening to books while walking, doing chores or commuting.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Vivid reminder."
    Would you listen to All Quiet on the Western Front again? Why?

    No, this was my first time to "read" this classic. It was a good reminder for me of what the costs of war are. It is too depressing to want to listen to again.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of All Quiet on the Western Front?

    The horror of the trenches was the most gripping.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    I am not sure that there is a favorite scene.


    If you could rename All Quiet on the Western Front, what would you call it?

    The title is very appropriate for this book. Don't want to mess with a classic.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    sam Anchorage, AK, United States 11-11-13
    sam Anchorage, AK, United States 11-11-13 Member Since 2006

    sjdickey

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    "great performance of a classic story"

    All Quiet on the Western Front is a classic tale made even better by Frank Muller's performance. The pain, the joy, and the misery I felt when reading the book were all brought back by this listen. Time and a credit well spent.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Barry Petaluma, CA, United States 10-25-13
    Barry Petaluma, CA, United States 10-25-13 Member Since 2008

    My interests run to psychology, popular science, history, world literature, and occasionally something fun like Jasper Fforde. It seems like the only free time I have for reading these days is when I'm in the car so I am extremely grateful for audio books. I started off reading just the contemporary stuff that I was determined not to clutter up my already stuffed bookcases with. And now audio is probably 90% of my "reading" matter.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A poignant statement on the reality of war"

    Frank Muller was a great audiobook reader. But first I should talk about the book.

    This is a great book. A first person account by an average soldier with no apparent exaggeration or didacticism. Pretty much every situation you can imagine a soldier would get into is presented but it never feels contrived. In fact, very little of the book involves actual fighting, which only adds to the realism. We have seen this so many times in the years since this book was written. We probably don't even realize how influential this book has been. And if some things in this book feel clichéd, you can probably blame all those imitators that came afterwards.

    But what makes the book stand out is the character of its narrator. His feelings about his situation, his feelings about his comrades, his reactions to what happens, his observations about the war, his recounting the opinions of the people he meets. Whatever illusions he may have had about fighting for his country, they are soon replaced by the reality of modern warfare. His loyalty is to his comrades. His main concerns are about things like getting enough to eat keeping his feet dry. These observations build quietly and powerfully through the whole book, and that is what makes it such an effective statement about war and the universality of mankind.

    I'll shut up now and let the book speak for itself.

    Frank Muller does a terrific job of conveying the tone of the bored soldier struggling to preserve his personhood. I only recently discovered this reader and am sorry to learn that he is no longer with us.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    sandy Paradise Valley, Montana 10-19-13
    sandy Paradise Valley, Montana 10-19-13 Member Since 2013
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    "everyone needs to read or listen to this book"
    If you could sum up All Quiet on the Western Front in three words, what would they be?

    This is WW1, WW2, Korea, You are there.


    What did you like best about this story?

    I would n o t say like, but appreciate this story and the author's talent..you were there right in the middle and a captive.


    What about Frank Muller’s performance did you like?

    He was 100 percent the soldier. Though this was a German soldier in WW1 and the original text was in German; the translation and Frank Muller put me right in the trenches or foxhole with an American G.I. No voice could be better. It was perfect.
    Better to listen than read.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No. I cannot imagine anyone could. It is only 6 or 7 hours but you need a breather.


    Any additional comments?

    This is a great classic written around 1928. Sad to say it could have been 2008. A great great book.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    val 10-13-13
    val 10-13-13 Member Since 2009
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    "Required reading"
    Where does All Quiet on the Western Front rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    One of the top ten books I have read.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    The protagonist and Kat. They both tried so hard to live through the horror and find ways to channel their emotions


    Which scene was your favorite?

    The first time he goes home and he tries to comprehend the dichotomy between the horrors on the front and the challenges of those behind the line. This book came out in 1928 yet war continues and young men and women continue to follow in the same emotional and physical footsteps. It is a sad fact that war continues.


    If you could rename All Quiet on the Western Front, what would you call it?

    The Horror of War


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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