We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
The Millionaire Next Door Audiobook

The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America's Rich

Regular Price:$27.93
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

Who are the rich in this country? What do they do? How do they invest? How did they get rich? Can you ever become one of them? Get the answers in The Millionaire Next Door, the never-before-told story about wealth in America. You'll be surprised by what you find out.

©2000 Thomas J. Stanley, Ph.D. and William D. Danko, Ph.D.; (P)2000 Simon & Schuster, Inc., All Rights Reserved, SOUND IDEAS is an Imprint of Simon & Schuster Audio Division, Simon & Schuster Inc.

What the Critics Say

"The implication of The Millionaire Next Door is that nearly anybody with a steady job can amass a tidy fortune." (Forbes)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.4 (4171 )
5 star
 (2481)
4 star
 (1173)
3 star
 (399)
2 star
 (81)
1 star
 (37)
Overall
4.4 (2765 )
5 star
 (1657)
4 star
 (756)
3 star
 (258)
2 star
 (58)
1 star
 (36)
Story
4.5 (2780 )
5 star
 (1668)
4 star
 (799)
3 star
 (248)
2 star
 (46)
1 star
 (19)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Adryan Metro ManilaPhilippines 04-30-07
    Adryan Metro ManilaPhilippines 04-30-07 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    70
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    81
    7
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    "A classic"

    A very insightful book and body of research that bust the myth that popular media tells us that wealthy people are high living people who spend vast amounts of money in expensive homes, exotic cars and branded goods.

    Just because a person looks the part by driving a fancy sports car and wears an expensive Rolex, does not mean that he actually have money in the bank. A very sobering fact.

    In fact, the true millionaires of America, according to the book are frugal, live simply, and spend most of their income on investments. A very good and insightful research on the true nature of America's stewards of wealth.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jim Eagan, MN, United States 04-03-05
    Jim Eagan, MN, United States 04-03-05 Member Since 2000
    HELPFUL VOTES
    17
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    44
    7
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "A little more respect for my neighbors"

    It was hard to imagine seeing our neighbor as a Millionaire before reading this book. Although I believe I do save enough for retirement, I still picked up great encouragement to do better. I played excellent Offense [could make a decent salary] but played terrible Defense [spend it if I have it]. From reading this book, I have put together a plan to be a millionaire in 14 years. Even if I do or don't make it, it's better to working at it with the tips given here!

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Alison New Hope, PA, USA 08-11-04
    Alison New Hope, PA, USA 08-11-04
    HELPFUL VOTES
    185
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    20
    19
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    2
    0
    Overall
    "Interesting but preachy"

    The beginning of this book really held my interest as it described the general characteristics of millionaires in America. It was difficult, however, to really think through many of the statistics that were presented because some terms are not well-defined. In a print book I would have been able to flip back and forth from definitions or go look them up elsewhere, but it's harder to do that with audiobooks.

    The last third of the book drags quite a bit, and there are sections that get so preachy that I found it irritating. The book also ends very abruptly.

    In general I think this book isn't well-suited to the audio format.

    17 of 21 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dujon Brampton, Ontario, Canada 11-06-08
    Dujon Brampton, Ontario, Canada 11-06-08
    HELPFUL VOTES
    6
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "A tour into the mind of real millionaires"

    I learned alot from this book. Most importantly, how to THINK like a millionaire. You first have to change your way of thinking before you can change your wallet thickness. It made me re-evaluate what's important in life. Social status or financial independence? This is a must read (or listen) for anyone with money.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Vikingabroad 08-09-05 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
    9
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    57
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    5
    Overall
    "Good book for the right person"

    If you have problems saving money, and you're a high income earner, then this book may interest you. Don't get me wrong, for most people that are interested in personal finances and wealth, it will give some insight and interesting stats that you may not have thought of before. But it could be summarized in a much much shorter book. Definitely get the abridged version (and that comes from a person that hates abridged versions)

    9 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    AlephZero Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 05-28-03
    AlephZero Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 05-28-03 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
    110
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    125
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "The Millionaire Next Door"

    The book brings nothing new: if you start saving when you're young and be frugal (miser is more proper :) and have a good job all along, chances are you will accumulate wealth and be a millionaire when you retire, if any of these conditions are lacking then it will be harder to have the seven figures on your account.
    This is obvious. Why save so much if you can't enjoy what your means can buy without resorting to second hand cars and mediocre neighborhoods? Beats me.
    Their conclusions were obtained on research done on millionaires that accepted to be paid 100 to 200 dollars an hour to be interviewed, as mentioned on the text. Isn't it obvious that this would force any conclusion on their levels of frugality and their viewpoints to be skewed by the inherent biasing of the sample group? In other words, millionaires that are "frugal" enough to sell their time for a couple hundred bucks an hour are people that are naturally tight with their money anyway. That doesn't imply that millionaires in general behave this way, their research needs revising. Every sparrow is a bird but not every bird is a sparrow.
    Apart from that, the text is repetitive and the few formulas given are mediocre at best.
    The good effect of reading the book is that in a debt-crazy risk-taking America, a little serious self-examination comes in handy and the book reminds the readers of that. But don't expect the book to bring any original idea or surprising revelation.

    102 of 132 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tracy Mount Louisa QueenslandAustralia 11-26-07
    Tracy Mount Louisa QueenslandAustralia 11-26-07
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Good but long"

    Great content, but some topics dragged out too long.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Hasnul Rawang, N/A, Malaysia 02-05-04
    Hasnul Rawang, N/A, Malaysia 02-05-04
    HELPFUL VOTES
    30
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Good info but not really well organized"

    The book has lots of information on the wealth in America and how do the millionaires get there. There were too many number and statistics that they throw at you that for the first few hours, it might seem it's getting no where. The book is written like a research paper. I would have preffered that they created a summary of the major points to become wealthy, and then elaborate to prove or strengthen their points. I'm not sure for the abridged book, but for those who loves numbers and percentage and can appreciate the research style of the book, then go for it. If not, maybe you can try the abridged book(don't quote me on this because i've not listened to the abridged book). Overall, other than the organization of the book, i believe that the information is an eye opener especially in terms of how we define and maintain wealth.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeffrey Columbus, OH, United States 05-13-16
    Jeffrey Columbus, OH, United States 05-13-16 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
    126
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    9
    8
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    3
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A good place to start but watch out!"

    If you wish to retire as a paper millionaire, the basic advice presented in this book is sound, particularly if you happen to have disposable income. Careful planning, living below one's means, adequate income and proper investing can lead to economic self sufficiency. The book provides many examples of folks who did, indeed find financial success.

    But there are issues with some of the advice the authors provide. Single minded dedication to amassing wealth is often penny wise and pound foolish. Living in better neighborhoods might be more expensive, but they are often safer, provide better schools, and may generally provide a better investment in real estate. Saving money by not going on vacation deprives both you and your children potentially life changing experiences. Hoarding money by not giving to charity, or even your own children, does it's own kind of spiritual damage.

    The sections involving children are especially worrisome. If one follows the advice in this book religiously, a first generation millionaire family will likely end up a third generation pauper. It is important to teach children self sufficiency, but it is equally, if not more important, to teach one's children to manage million dollar investment portfolios, and to make informed decisions on budgeting and allocations of large amounts of money. After all, a wise person would not leave a large financial legacy without the tools to use it properly.

    The generation of wealth is not a goal in itself. In one example presented in the book, a woman expressed the goal to retire with five million dollars. Yet in the process of doing so, they live like paupers. This woman might never see retirement, might never enjoy all that money she carefully hoarded, might forever miss out on the joys and experiences that wealth can provide. Save for retirement of course, but never forget that we only get one life.

    And in the end, that's where this book fails. Truly wealthy people certainly plan for the future, invest properly, and save much of their income. Yet they also try to enjoy the fruits of their labor, and they share their wealth as much as possible.

    If you are not a millionaire but want to be, read this book. It's much of what your upper middle class parents should have taught you, but it's not everything, If money is all you care about, you will do well to follow the advice in this book. Yet if you wish to lead a rich life, the kind of life full of experiences and learning and yes, even of civil responsibility, you will do well to moderate your zeal of living the frugal life outlined in this book.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeanne 02-07-15
    Jeanne 02-07-15 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    4
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Everybody should read this book."

    This book should be required reading in high school and college, especially where "conspicuous consumption" abounds. I am trying to get my 23-year-old to read it, as I think it will give him a perspective he is unlikely to have otherwise.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
Sort by:
  • Amazon Customer
    UK
    1/15/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Lots of stats"

    predominantly stats, but good info none the less. I can tick it off of my list of books to listen to now.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • SALLY
    12/2/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Inspiring stories of ordinary people..."

    I really enjoyed this book as it is an undeniable collection of data and stories illustrating how ordinary people have accumulated wealth with daily habits and commitments to their goals. It is an eyeopener in places, especially for those of us who feel we have been striving for many years with little progress. I am sure there is something to be learned in this book for everyone. The narration is perfect for the topic and content and is very easy to listen to.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • simon
    Southwell, United Kingdom
    4/15/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Interesting in parts"

    Liked the formulae to track your wealth.
    Always been a pay your self first investor never knew there was a term for it

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.