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Library of Congress Series on Digital Future: Lecture One, Blogs with David Weinberger (11/15/04) | [David Weinberger]

Library of Congress Series on Digital Future: Lecture One, Blogs with David Weinberger (11/15/04)

On November 15, 2004 in Washington, D.C., David Weinberger, former senior internet adviser to the Howard Dean presidential campaign, discussed how weblogs work & their value in gathering knowledge. He is now at Harvard University's Berkman Center for Internet & Society, where he is working on a book about how the digital age is changing the way information is organized & classified. First in a series.
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Publisher's Summary

On November 15, 2004 in Washington, D.C., David Weinberger, former senior internet adviser to the Howard Dean presidential campaign, discussed how weblogs work & their value in gathering knowledge. He is now at Harvard University's Berkman Center for Internet & Society, where he is working on a book about how the digital age is changing the way information is organized & classified. First in a series.

Enjoy this lecture? Listen to the entire Digital Future lecture series.
Hear David Weinberger's contribution to The Cluetrain Manifesto: The End of Business as usual.

©2004 National Cable Satellite Corporation

What Members Say

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3.4 (216 )
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  •  
    Victoria Jackson, MS, USA 12-07-04
    Victoria Jackson, MS, USA 12-07-04
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    "Very Interesting"

    As a fan of blogging and a general Internet junkie, I found this interview fascinating. I would never have run across it had I not been perusing Audible's book selections. It's things like this -- offering more than just great audiobooks for sale - that keeps me a customer.

    10 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Maria K Hoffman 12-16-04 Member Since 2004
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    "Fascinating!"

    What a great surprise. I downloaded this to try something for the first time from the free section, not thinking anything "free" could be very good. I was wrong - it's worth your time, even if you aren't familiar with the topic.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Pat Furrie Deltona, FL 12-28-04
    Pat Furrie Deltona, FL 12-28-04 Listener Since 2004
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    "Good intro into digital information orgazation"

    David Weinberger's lecture is quite interesting, and speaks at a level easy for most people to follow. He contrasts past and present knowledge organization schemes, and explains how this is important for the Internet.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jim Alameda, CA, USA 07-29-05
    Jim Alameda, CA, USA 07-29-05 Member Since 2004
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    "Two essential facts"

    1. There is no universal taxonomy.
    2. The owners of the information no longer own the organization of it.

    There's incredible power in the repercussions and interactions of those two statements. In this lecture, David Weinberger helps you to see why this is and what it means. The world is incredibly non-deterministic; knowledge trees (aka taxonomies like the Dewey Decimal System) are entirely deterministic and as such can only define the vaguest shape of what's really out there.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    J. Federico Maplewood, NJ USA 02-25-05
    J. Federico Maplewood, NJ USA 02-25-05 Member Since 2003

    gadgetboy

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    "Weinberger ROCKS. The rest of the panel is, eh..."

    David Weinberger (of Cluetrain Manifesto fame, among many other things) talks not just of blogs, but taxonomy and the nature of information storage, retrieval and relevance in a networked world. REALLY interesting.

    Well, at least the first half.

    In the second half of the presentation, Weinberger's fellow panelists contribute to the discussion. None of them add much to the conversation and frankly, they're no where near as exciting and dynamic as Weinberger. (Read: they're boring as hell)

    That said, the dynamism and enlightenment of the first half easily makes up for the second. Get it.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Judith Falls Church, VA, USA 01-04-05
    Judith Falls Church, VA, USA 01-04-05
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    "This is Great."

    I didn't expect to like this. I just downloaded it to test my MP3 player. But since I had it, I thought I'd listen for a few seconds. I couldn't stop listening. It is fascinating. The explanation of how language (and thus knowledge) is organized and how it is being drastically changed by the web is not as obvious as it might seem. This speech is easy to understand. The speaker uses a lot of examples and funny analogies to get his point across. I'm going to look for more of his work.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sue Slack New York, NY United States 04-15-12
    Sue Slack New York, NY United States 04-15-12 Member Since 2011

    slacker2

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    "Pompous and says nothing."
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    Justifies blogging as the best way to learn history. Maybe inveterate bloggers will enjoy it. It denigrates true research in favor of blogging. Also dismissive of the 17th Century (the era of Isaac Newton, et al.) as a lowpoint of learning.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kenneth LEESBURG, VA, United States 02-15-06
    Kenneth LEESBURG, VA, United States 02-15-06 Member Since 2005

    Old & fat, but strong; American, Chinese, & Indian (sort of); Ph.D. in C.S.; strategy, economics & stability theory; trees & machining.

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    "Interesting Speech; Lame Q&A Session"

    Important observations about the gradual death of authoritative knowledge.

    Very very articulate defense of the nature of blogs and the internet, but the content of the argument is rather mainstream at this point.

    Too one-sided. We will see a correction to the excesses of the current direction, but not a reversion to the past. Failure to speculate about this limits the depth of the talk.

    Audience questions like, “What regulation should be placed on blogs” didn’t do justice to the talk.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    A WinnipegScotland 06-07-05
    A WinnipegScotland 06-07-05
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    "Fun Lecture, Great Series"

    I just listened to the entire series of available LoC Digital Future lectures (hopefully there will be more). Thank you Audible and LoC for making these available (and free!).

    Mr. Weinberger is an entertaining speaker, filling his lecture with humour and anecdotes. If you know nothing about blogging, here is a some worthwhile discussion on the topic. If you are like myself, and already are familiar with the 'net and blogging in general, there isn't much new here, but the topic is presented in such a fun fashion that it was enjoyable to hear on the topic all the same. There was some good discussion on validity of information, authoritative voice, etc... This was probably the lightest lecture of the series. A good choice of topic and speaker to start off the series, which clearly aimed at a very broad audience.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mark Newberry, SC, USA 08-27-09
    Mark Newberry, SC, USA 08-27-09
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    "Sound Quality is Bad - Dated, and Boring"

    The sound quality was bad. This is dated too, 2004. I found it very boring and combined with the sound quality being terrible, I didn't listen to much of it.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
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