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Factory Man: How One Furniture Maker Battled Offshoring, Stayed Local - and Helped Save an American Town | [Beth Macy]

Factory Man: How One Furniture Maker Battled Offshoring, Stayed Local - and Helped Save an American Town

With over $500 million a year in sales, the Bassett Furniture Company was once the world's biggest wood furniture manufacturer. But beginning in the 1980s, the Bassett company suffered from an influx of cheap Chinese furniture as the first waves of Asian competition hit, and ultimately was forced to send its production offshore to Asia. Only one man fought back. That man is John Bassett III, a descendant of the Bassetts who is now chairman of Vaughan-Bassett Furniture Co, which employs more than 700 Virginians and has sales of over $90 million.
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Publisher's Summary

With over $500 million a year in sales, the Bassett Furniture Company was once the world's biggest wood furniture manufacturer. Run by the same powerful Virginia family for three generations, it was also the center of life in Bassett, VA-an unincorporated town that existed solely for the people who built the company's products. But beginning in the 1980s, the Bassett company suffered from an influx of cheap Chinese furniture as the first waves of Asian competition hit, and ultimately was forced to send its production offshore to Asia.

Only one man fought back. That man is John Bassett III, a descendant of the Bassetts who is now chairman of Vaughan-Bassett Furniture Co, which employs more than 700 Virginians and has sales of over $90 million. In Factory Man, Beth Macy brings to life Bassett's deeply personal furniture and family story. As she shows how he uses legal maneuvers, factory efficiencies, and sheer grit, cunning, and will to save hundreds of jobs, she also discovers the hidden and shocking truth about industry and America.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.


©2014 Beth Macy (P)2014 Hachette Audio

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  •  
    James 03-03-15
    James 03-03-15 Member Since 2015
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    "Portrait of a One Fingered Salute!"
    If you could sum up Factory Man in three words, what would they be?

    Brilliant but disturbing


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    John Bassett III Because the book is all about him and his personality. He is many things all rolled up into one.


    Have you listened to any of Kristin Kalbli’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    No, I have not.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    By far the most heart rending story in the entire book is when JB III was observing a manufacturer in China in the finishing stain and sealant spraying area of the plant. He noted the lack of ventilation and protective gear for the workers. These workers are Chinese presents, fresh from the farm that makes money for their families. When JB III asks his host about the concentration of toxins and lack of protections his host simply and shockingly observed that, ‘they last about three years; then they die; then we get new man.’ This cold disregard for human life tells me China is where we were in our early industrial age 200 years ago. Only by looking back can we encompass and understand the horror of such a statement. We can only seek to understand it. We can never condone it.


    Any additional comments?

    Factory Man is a portrait of a specific individual, namely John Bassett III, the son of a North Carolina furniture manufacturing dynasty. It is also a reflection of the history of furniture manufacturing in America and the world. The subtitle of this book is How One Furniture Maker Battled Offshoring, Stayed Local - and Helped Save an American Town. In as far as Vaughan-Bassett Furniture Co, employs more than 700 Virginians and has sales of more than $90 million the subtitle is true. As much as I personally applaud Mr. Bassett’s personal commitment to his people, determination, pluck, and downright scrappiness in the face of the Asian tsunami wave of computation that created that “giant sucking sound” that swallowed up 673,000 American furniture manufacturing jobs, as Ross Perot predicted when he described the effects of the North American Free Trade Agreement NAFTA, Mr. Bassett’s accomplishment is only marginally effective for what is one tenth of one percent of the lost in workforce. It reminds me of the image of the mouse giving the one fingered salute to the eagle about to devour him. Except in this case it is a Chinese dragon about to dine on the mouse. However, people love stories of the underdog battling a mismatched opponent and winning. From that prospective John Bassett III is a star spangled, red, white and blue bedecked, all American hero. We wish to God we had more like them. Why we don’t becomes obvious in my later comments.

    As with any good portrait, this portrait on John Bassett III, not only depicted him with all his admirable qualities, but also his warts and flaws as well. For example, it is described in a matter-of-fact way how the furniture industry in Grand Rapids, Michigan, with its union wage scales, lost out to southern manufacturers, in their right-to-work anti-union states, and unofficial two tiered wage scales; one for white workers and another lower one for black workers. There is no doubt that John is to be admired in that he insisted on an integrated work force. Even if the black workers got less money and the dirtier of the shop jobs at least he provided work to both races. Not all southern manufacturers had an integrated work force at that time. I do not get the sense that John did this because he was a raciest. No! he was just a southern gentleman; product of his time. To balance this when he fought for and won those 700 Virginian jobs it was jobs for both races. It is interesting that JB III as he likes to be called is acutely aware that he and other integrated manufactures owe their completive edge to their black workers. At one point he acknowledges that his black workers help make him rich.

    There is also an example of southern paternalism or perhaps less harshly just doing the right thing, when JB III visits a retired worker and gives them, “a little piece of money” to help them along. These kind of anecdotal stories, although speaking well of John’s humanity, compassion, and charity still prick the listeners conscious when remembering the idled Grand Rapids workers due to the built in southern dual wage scale that gave advantage to the company that enriched John and his family.

    The real eye opener story in this book is how many other manufactures entered into collusion agreements with Chinese manufactures to ship manufacturing jobs to China in exchange for, not fighting, closing their factories, and accepting a sweet heart deal to put their brand names on Chinese manufactures products and sell them is if they had made here. The American brand names got a cut of the profits the Chinese swamped local manufactures, not playing ball, by undercutting prices and pushed the local manufacturer to the wall. How is this not, the same thing that southern manufactures did to Grand Rapids a half century earlier, one might ask? Simple, the Chinese government put their fat thumb of a governmental subsidy on the cost of production scale to the Chinese manufactures advantage; allowing them to market their product in the US at less than the cost to manufacture it in China. When John Bassett III realized this he assembled a collision of manufacturers to made use of the Byrd amendment to slap duties on the Chinese manufactured goods whose funds were directed back to participating suit manufacturers to modernize their plants and become completive. John did this with his plant. Alas not all manufactures used the money to modernize and compete. A good deal of the manufactures used the funds to feather their corporate salary nest while the American Nation was left to retrain the dislocated workers through Trade Readjustment Act funds. Some of those who did not or could not retrain sought to protect their income long term by seeking Social Security Disability Benefits. However, that is a sore subject not covered in this book. In my opinion, it is hard to blame them when corporations did the same thing by pocketing the money meant for modernization. In my opinion, there is enough moral condemnation for both kinds of system abusers. I will not condemn one without condemning the other.

    The sad conclusion to this story, is that although the little guy, John Bassett III, did succeed in saving a town and 700 jobs, China quietly moved their operations first to Viet Nam and then to Indonesia to avoid paying the duty on future products and become the job generating powerhouse of Asia. Although our policy leaders are not saying this aloud, it appears that they have reached the policy conclusion that it is better to allow this competition and engage the world on the globalized field of commerce by allowing their cheaper wage structure to hollow out our manufacturing prowess rather than keep our jobs, frustrate their growth, and face an angry nation of wants and unmet needs of a failed state, with a huge army seeking to level the playing field violently. Sadly, in the big picture sense, this is probably a good call geopolitically speaking. Unfortunately, the projected re-investment in America, in education, high tech jobs, and updated infrastructure leading to a work force of MIT graduates that will imaginer the next prosperous golden age has not occurred. In its’ place we have concentrated wealth in fewer and fewer hands some of whom renounce their citizenship to avoid paying taxes or hide their money in foreign banks. This is creating a swelling tide of resentment here at home. Money classes beware of this trend!

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Catherine S. Read Fairfax, VA USA 09-08-14
    Catherine S. Read Fairfax, VA USA 09-08-14 Member Since 2010

    A digital media consultant and business strategist. I'm a lifelong lover of books in all forms.

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    "It's the Community, not just the Economy"
    Where does Factory Man rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    One of the best audiobooks I've listened to. It's written by a journalist, and while it's a non-fiction account of the collapse of the domestic furniture industry, but it reads like a novel. It's riveting.


    What other book might you compare Factory Man to and why?

    Very much like The House of Mondavi. A multi-generational account of a family owned business with all the intrigue that wealthy powerful families have.


    Which character – as performed by Kristin Kalbli – was your favorite?

    JB III of course. He is the force behind the story. Reviewers have almost universally forecast that the book will become a movie. It's easy to see the appeal after listening to this audiobook.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    The whole world turned against John D. Bassett, III. Even his extended family. He faced the criticism and shunning by lifelong friends and colleagues in the furniture business. But he never backed down. He feels a responsibility to the 700 people who rely on their jobs at Vaughan-Bassett to feed their families. He stands for something.


    Any additional comments?

    It's a portrait of a time and place that are largely forgotten now in our information driven global economy. As a lifelong resident of Virginia who was born in Galax, I have a great deal of pride in the history of the furniture industry and the Virginia families who created an engine of economy that employed workers for three generations. It's not easy being the last man standing, but John D. Bassett, III has rare grit and determination. Beth Macy has written a rare and wonderful story.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    KenCarpenter.com Windermere, FL 04-18-15
    KenCarpenter.com Windermere, FL 04-18-15
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    "Great book but too many details"

    The story, the history and the characters were quite interesting, but all of the similar company names, the many disparate cities and towns, and intertwined family trees made it very hard to follow and sort out in audio format. But I simply gave up worrying about it and treated each listen as a simple front-porch chat.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Daryl Edmonton, Alberta, Canada 01-13-15
    Daryl Edmonton, Alberta, Canada 01-13-15
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    "Entertaining, educational, enlightening"
    Where does Factory Man rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    Probably in my top 10... I have read many audiobooks and this one is a great one. The Author does interject herself into the story, but I disagree with the reviewer who says it is like a National Inquirer piece.

    It is sometimes hard to follow the family tree and many players in the business, but this is a very very minor setback in a well-written, well-performed masterpiece of journalism. Beth Macy breathed life into factory workers, CEOs, and everyday townspeople both in America and abroad, in particular John Bassett III - to some an ass, to others a hero.


    Have you listened to any of Kristin Kalbli’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    I have not yet, but I will be looking at her backlist shortly; terrific performance!


    Any additional comments?

    This book is a terrific piece of journalism - I can understand why the author chose to interject herself into it. Without her voice present, it would have been hard to develop it and move it along smoothly, particularly with several sources not wishing to speak openly.
    Well worth your time and credit!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jane W. Sisk Richmond, VA 01-09-15
    Jane W. Sisk Richmond, VA 01-09-15 Member Since 2013

    mom of six

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    "What a story!"

    An amazing story that is very detail and precisely written. John Bassett III was in a driven man and I enjoyed learning about him in this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    M. C. Holland 12-21-14 Member Since 2013
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    "Interesting History"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    I would recommend this audiobook to a friend. It is both interesting and educational. All Americans should understand how we lost our manufacturing sector and what can be done. Factory Man gives insight into this timely topic.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Vicki Montpelier, VA, United States 09-25-14
    Vicki Montpelier, VA, United States 09-25-14 Member Since 2015
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    "It's the story of hundreds of factory towns"
    Would you listen to Factory Man again? Why?

    Absolutely. I grew up in Bassett and left as soon after high school as I could get away. My parents did not work for any of the factories (a nurse and a teacher) so I really didn't know anything about the businesses or people portrayed in the book. For me it was a story about any of a hundred factory towns (furniture or otherwise) all over the country. The truth is (and always will be) that unskilled jobs will always transition to the low cost provider. It's how JD Bassett got his start in the first place. The other truth is that some businesses are run well and some aren't (just as the Enron employees). This is a well researched and written tale that is a great example of both of those truths.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Factory Man?

    For me it was very touching to know the story behind the naming of my middle school, Mary Hunter.


    Which character – as performed by Kristin Kalbli – was your favorite?

    Of course it's "Little John", JB III. My Mom and Dad remember him being referred to as "Little John".


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

    It could be any business in any town.


    Any additional comments?

    Beth Macy did an amazingly thorough job of researching this book and told a very compelling story that I believe was fair from all sides of the tale. She didn't seem to impose her own personal or political views which allowed me to analyze the story and come to my own conclusions. That's a hard thing for a writer to do and I really appreciated it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    rightmuch 08-20-14
    rightmuch 08-20-14 Member Since 2015
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    "Simply fascinating."
    Would you consider the audio edition of Factory Man to be better than the print version?

    can't compare


    What other book might you compare Factory Man to and why?

    Nothing comparable that I know of.


    Have you listened to any of Kristin Kalbli’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    No


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    Jim Franklin nearly killing the auther.


    Any additional comments?

    It should be required reading for all of those like me and my family who live in the area but "ain't from around here". We've been here for 17 years, I served on the Henry County BOS, but I never knew just how much all these characters were interrelated. Now I know why the place is the way it is. Kudos to Beth Macey.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mary I. Silveus Yardley, PA USA 08-15-14
    Mary I. Silveus Yardley, PA USA 08-15-14 Member Since 2004
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    "Beth Macy's Sense of Balance is Impeccable"
    What made the experience of listening to Factory Man the most enjoyable?

    The narration was fine, particularly because of the light - but present - use of the Southern dialect where it could add something to the hearing of the words. The balance shown in the writing of this book is nothing short of a literary high-wire performance. The complications inherent in every element of the globalization question (i.e. the people who need the low-priced Chinese goods are the very people who are being hurt by wage compression and factory closures) were pulled out, examined and seen through the lenses of all those involved and then placed back into the scene. Macy beautifully avoided the lure of "solving" the problem or waxing political. She somehow found a perfect spot between describing the effects of the global economy on real people's lives and outlining the macro-level economic and geopolitical realities of the 21st Century. Now I have to go see if JDIII is still alive so I can send him a (reserved) fan letter.

    Thank you, Ms. Macy. I'm better for having read your work.


    What does Kristin Kalbli bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Non-theatrical yet sensitive rendering. The narration fit the content of the book very well, which could not have been an easy accomplishment for Ms. Kalbli.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

    Factory Man - A great book, ruined by a no-talent filmmaker


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mr. 73 07-28-14
    Mr. 73 07-28-14

    I like Biographies about people from the back pages. Not much on Political Bios -- all the same to me with a few exceptions.

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    "Off shoring does't start till book is half over"

    Author injects herself into story. Most of book is gossip on Bassett family. Not really a business book more like National Enquier.

    1 of 5 people found this review helpful

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