Driven: How Human Nature Shapes Our Choices Audiobook | Paul R. Lawrence, Nitin Nohria | Audible.com
We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
Driven: How Human Nature Shapes Our Choices | [Paul R. Lawrence, Nitin Nohria]

Driven: How Human Nature Shapes Our Choices

Two Harvard Business School professors synthesize 200 years of thought along with the latest research drawn from the biological and social sciences to propose a new theory, a unified synthesis of human nature. Paul Lawrence and Nitin Nohria have studied the way people behave in that most fascinating arena of human behavior - the workplace - and from their work they produce a book that examines the four separate and distinct emotive drives that guide human behavior.
Regular Price:$24.95
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

In this astonishing, provocative, and solidly researched book, two Harvard Business School professors synthesize 200 years of thought along with the latest research drawn from the biological and social sciences to propose a new theory, a unified synthesis of human nature. Paul Lawrence and Nitin Nohria have studied the way people behave in that most fascinating arena of human behavior - the workplace - and from their work they produce a book that examines the four separate and distinct emotive drives that guide human behavior and influence the choices people make: the drives to acquire, bond, learn, and defend.

They ultimately show that, just as advances in information technology have spurred the New Economy in the last quarter of the 20th century, current advances in biology will be the key to understanding humans and organizations in the new millennium.

©2002 Paul R. Lawrence and Nitin Nohria (P)2010 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"This is a stimulating and provocative book in bringing together important ideas from different fields, and, thereby, giving us a whole new slant on 'human nature.'" (Edgar H. Schein, Sloan Fellows Professor of Management Emeritus and Senior Lecturer, MIT)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.7 (34 )
5 star
 (8)
4 star
 (14)
3 star
 (7)
2 star
 (4)
1 star
 (1)
Overall
3.9 (22 )
5 star
 (7)
4 star
 (8)
3 star
 (5)
2 star
 (2)
1 star
 (0)
Story
3.9 (23 )
5 star
 (7)
4 star
 (8)
3 star
 (7)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (1)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    George MARY ESTHER, FLORIDA, United States 04-26-13
    George MARY ESTHER, FLORIDA, United States 04-26-13 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
    7
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    51
    10
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Like reading a research paper"
    Any additional comments?

    I recommend the first half of the book as a great read/listen. The second half of the book is written in an almost formal research paper style. The authors try to apply the concepts broadly to business. The business ideas are much to vague to have the meaningful impact that the first portion gives. The book presents a hypothesis that four drive are genetically present in most of the human population. I thought it was very overall an interesting read. If you like "brain books," I suggest "Brain Rules" as another good read in this category.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Keshav Union city, CA, United States 03-02-10
    Keshav Union city, CA, United States 03-02-10 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
    40
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    15
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Read this review and save your time and $$."

    Here's the book: Human beings want to acquire things, bond, learn and defend things they've acquired through doing these three. There are variations in the dominant force within each person, family, group, culture. THE END. You already knew this.. didn't you?

    13 of 18 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Randall Lubbock, TX, United States 02-13-12
    Randall Lubbock, TX, United States 02-13-12 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    5
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Don't listen while you are driving"

    I purchased this title as a business book. However, this is more a book about psychology. The business implications of their theory are only explored in the final chapters. The authors make a bold attempt to reduce human nature to four drives, using evolutionary theory. While they propose some interesting ideas, I think humans are much more complex. What about the problem of evil? They skirt this issue. Their ideas are interesting and certainly thought-provoking, but they seem to be much too sure of themselves, and they lay it on thickly. The book is way too long in an attempt to appear scholarly. The narration also comes across as condescending.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brian Birmingham, AL, United States 02-28-13
    Brian Birmingham, AL, United States 02-28-13 Member Since 2013
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    5
    4
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "well written, cohesive and interesting"

    i enjoyed the entire book and listened to it in the car - it will defiantly enhance your world view

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Henri Sora Hameenlinna, Finland 04-09-10
    Henri Sora Hameenlinna, Finland 04-09-10 Member Since 2008
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    15
    1
    Overall
    "Quite interesting"

    Actually I did find the four drive theory quite interesting because basis is really toughly thought. It would be tremendously intriguing to see the results the studies authors suggest at the end.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-5 of 5 results

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.