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Up from Slavery Audiobook

Up from Slavery

Up from Slavery is the 1901 autobiography of Booker T. Washington detailing his slow and steady rise from a slave child during the Civil War, to the difficulties and obstacles he overcame to get an education at the new Hampton University, to his work establishing vocational schools - most notably the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama - to help black people and other disadvantaged minorities learn useful, marketable skills and work to pull themselves, as a race, up by the bootstraps.
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Publisher's Summary

Up from Slavery is the 1901 autobiography of Booker T. Washington detailing his slow and steady rise from a slave child during the Civil War, to the difficulties and obstacles he overcame to get an education at the new Hampton University, to his work establishing vocational schools - most notably the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama - to help black people and other disadvantaged minorities learn useful, marketable skills and work to pull themselves, as a race, up by the bootstraps.

He reflects on the generosity of both teachers and philanthropists who helped in educating blacks and native Americans. He describes his efforts to instill manners, breeding, health and a feeling of dignity to students. His educational philosophy stresses combining academic subjects with learning a trade (something which is reminiscent of the educational theories of John Ruskin). Washington explained that the integration of practical subjects is partly designed to reassure the white community as to the usefulness of educating black people.

Public Domain (P)2006 Legacy Audio Books, Inc.

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.6 (41 )
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4.6 (38 )
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4.3 (37 )
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  •  
    Jennifer 09-02-15
    Jennifer 09-02-15 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "The Perfect Reader"
    What made the experience of listening to Up from Slavery the most enjoyable?

    I tried listening to the free version of this book on Librevox. While I have enjoyed other audio books from that source, this one was painful. The voice just didn't match the book, and the reader wasn't quite fluent in English. Hearing Andrew Barnes' reading of this book in the sample was what made me get an Audible membership.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Up from Slavery?

    When Booker T. Washington and the Lady Principle at the school were inspecting rooms, they found a room where three girls, new from the country were sharing one toothbush. This is just one example of Washington's vivid descriptions of the deep poverty in the south.


    What does Andrew L. Barnes bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Andrew L. Barnes has the perfect voice for this book. His reading voice is dignified yet grounded in a combination of humility and confidence with just the right touch of wry humor. He is so good that it's hard to remember that the book is not being read by Booker T. Washington himself.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Yes, but I couldn't because life requires that grown ups do things.


    Any additional comments?

    Andrew L. Barnes is so good that I kinda want to go through Audible and just listen to all the books he reads.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Thomas Johnson Baltimore, Maryland USA 03-14-15
    Thomas Johnson Baltimore, Maryland USA 03-14-15 Member Since 2010

    Professional Nurse love to cook Democratic and conservative.

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    "A great inspired story."

    very inspiring and up lifting. I readi this book as a youth and didn't understand nor enjoy the true meaning of the book. Now older I truly appreciate this work.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Magpie Santa Fe Springs, CA United States 04-02-16
    Magpie Santa Fe Springs, CA United States 04-02-16 Member Since 2013

    Not going to take it anymore

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    "Great, classic story"
    Where does Up from Slavery rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    The story is at 7 but the narrator is at 2.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Booker T. Washington, of course.


    Would you be willing to try another one of Andrew L. Barnes’s performances?

    No, I thought he was stiff and I was very irritated that an African-American man was chosen that didn't sound anything like a Black man of the 1800's from the South would have sounded. He was very stodgy sounding and I would never have guessed he was from the South and Black.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    Washington living under the boardwalk in Richmond.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    J.B. Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States 03-19-16
    J.B. Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States 03-19-16 Member Since 2009

    Reading, the arts and physical activity clarify, explain, illustrate, and interpret life’s goods and bads.

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    "On the Demons of Bondage: Washington 2 of 3"

    Up from Slavery, Booker T. Washington, Narrated by Andrew L. Barnes is an autobiographical history of Booker T. Washington as an educator; which also includes the story of how he rose from slavery to one of the nation’s top educators by the turn of the twentieth century. He tells his story from the perspective of how magnanimous the white race was to him, his people and his efforts in founding and institutionalizing the Tuskegee Institute. I read this work in succession with, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, by Frederick Douglass and The Souls of Black Folk, by W.E.B. DuBois.

    Through his innate love of learning and good fortune, Mr. Washington rose from slavery, obtained education, and how through fortuity became country teacher and from there matured into one of the more influential educator in America. In fact, he is the force behind the Tuskegee University. His preference to better his race was to learn technical talents as a prerequisite to a liberal arts education. His philosophy is centered on his belief if the Negro (his term) is going to enhance his position in the Union he must learn to deport himself admirably and after time the Negro will earn his equal place in society.

    He instructs his charges to, teach themselves to model oneself after the white society’s values and excel therein and all will come to pass to make everyone equal. His teachings obviously, has achieved much success, in moving many Afro-Americans into the mainstream of America, and he undoubtedly influenced Martin Luther King and others. Unanswered though is the question, would he have held his same opinion if he knew today, the precise struggle he defined continues without being fully obtained 115 years later?

    His style of writing is to tell his lifelong history, stopping off to impart motivational stories – which were for the most part, just that, intriguing tales of human interactions demonstrating high principles of right and wrong behavior. Yet his tempo for telling his story (and that of Mr. Barnes, our narrator) were – at best, lethargic and dulled. Still a worthwhile read, particularly as I have read it, in comparison to Douglas and DuBois’ self-histories/philosophical underpinnings.

    Referencing back to my self-imposed trilogy on antebellum, postbellum and the turn of the 20th century look back on slavery and its lingering effects in America, I can conclude: Mr. Douglass teaches us the evil underpinnings of slavery and therein how to strengthen oneself against its dehumanization while Mr. Washington, preaches goodness and conformity will eventuate into complete assimilation. Mr. DuBois poetically, but with hypocrisy, explains the social distraught with which we even today remain infested.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Douglas Show 09-02-15
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    "Enjoyable to Listen to..."

    I would not have had patience to read. I kept waiting to hear him mention George Washington Carver. I was disappointed that I never heard any reference to him.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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