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The Price of Freedom Audiobook

The Price of Freedom

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Publisher's Summary

Alexander Domokos wrote this memoir of his years during and after the Second World War with two purposes in mind. He wanted to allow his daughter a glimpse into his past and to enlighten others about the tragedy of his homeland, Hungary.

"I remember how impatient I was with my father when he tried to talk of his youth. I also swept aside my mother's attempts to tell me of her tragic childhood. Many years after their deaths I was fortunate to read their letters and notes, only then realizing my irreplaceable loss: their view of the world at the turn of the century. Most of their experiences are lost to me forever. Often it is only after loss that we realize value. I would like to spare my daughter that irreplaceable loss."

Domokos believes that Hungary's sufferings were due in large part to the unjust peace settlements after the First World War.

"As Hungarians, we were driven into the arms of Hitler by the West's indifference to our legitimate grievances....We had witnessed horrible atrocities committed by the Communists in 1919 after the First World War. Drifting into an alliance with Germany appeared at that time to be the lesser evil."

Even after the Second World War, Hungary underwent more suffering.

"In 1945, while the West was basking in the glory of victory, our abandoned country began a new struggle for survival. My family's hardship was not an exception but rather the norm in that forsaken part of Europe. For us, 1945 was not the end of the war but the beginning of a new kind of struggle."

Even though the West was the victor in the Second World War, Dokomos is asking that the people of the West open their hearts and look more deeply into the effects of the war. He hopes to challenge the victor's one-sided view in seeing themselves as the sole protector of righteousness.

©1999 Alex Domokos with Rita Y. Toews; (P)2004 Blackstone Audiobooks

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  •  
    Peter Banyule, Australia 09-09-05
    Peter Banyule, Australia 09-09-05 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
    9
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    67
    9
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    Overall
    "Highly recommended"

    A first class lesson in "the price of freedom" under the suffocating atmosphere of communism and nazism or for that matter any dictatorship.

    Very well read gripping story. I highly recommend this book to anyone interetsed not only in history but in an individual's struggle against tyranny, the injustices imposed by the so called great powers and the indomitable spirit of man to overcome great adversity.

    One of the best books I have downloaded from Audible.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael Walnut Creek, CA, United States 03-21-06
    Michael Walnut Creek, CA, United States 03-21-06 Member Since 2016

    I focus on fiction, sci-fi, fantasy, science, history, politics and read a lot. I try to review everything I read.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    5582
    ratings
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    1460
    470
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    1359
    9
    Overall
    "Just a memoir"

    This is not a bad book, it is an average book in a genre containing truly great books. I was primarily disappointed because the publisher’s summary led me to believe this book would truly challenge the west’s view of itself. It does not. It is an average memoir about the post-war effects of Stalinism on a family. The book does challenge communism, but is that really necessary at this point? (Besides, there are better books filling that need already). Although this is a reasonable story of surviving adversity, it not an inspiring story of heroic confrontation of evil.

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful

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