We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
Call anytime(888) 283-5051
Speech-Less: Tales of a White House Survivor | [Matthew Latimer]

Speech-Less: Tales of a White House Survivor

As a young political geek, Matt Latimer dreamed of one day heading to Washington to work for a conservative president and usher in another Reagan Revolution. With the support of his slightly mortified liberal parents, he tried to do just that - but his youthful exuberance began to cool as he moved up the rungs of power.
Regular Price:$35.93
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

As a young political geek, Matt Latimer dreamed of one day heading to Washington to work for a conservative president and usher in another Reagan Revolution. With the support of his slightly mortified liberal parents, he tried to do just that - but his youthful exuberance began to cool as he moved up the rungs of power.

On Capitol Hill he worked for a Congressman who "misremembered" basic facts, assisted a U.S. Senator who hid from his own staff, and met another who cowed her male aides into carrying her purse.

Finally ensconced in the White House as one of George W. Bush's chief speechwriters, he soon realized that the post wasn't at all what he'd envisioned. Less like Aaron Sorkin's The West Wing and more like NBC's The Office, D.C.'s most prestigious address turned out to be a bizarro world in which the major players were in some ways mirror opposites of their public images.

©2009 Matthew Latimer; (P)2009 Random House

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.4 (19 )
5 star
 (4)
4 star
 (6)
3 star
 (5)
2 star
 (2)
1 star
 (2)
Overall
4.4 (7 )
5 star
 (3)
4 star
 (4)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Story
4.3 (7 )
5 star
 (3)
4 star
 (3)
3 star
 (1)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Vargas Minneapolis, MN, United States 07-25-10
    Vargas Minneapolis, MN, United States 07-25-10 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
    65
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    22
    7
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    2
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Informative and Engaging"

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Even though I clearly do not share Mr. Latimer's political views, I thought his insights were very elightening. As you might expect there are times where the author is clearly trying to defend both his philosophy and those who have been political allies, but on the whole the author is extremely honest and candid, which merits considerable respect.

    One of the part of this book that I found most distressing was how Mr. Latimer was consistantly hired for jobs for which even he admits he was grossly underqualified. He then rails on the very same practice when Mr. Rove applies it to hiring for the Pentagon. An interesting bit of selective memory.

    I recommend this book to conservatives, and especially to liberals, not because you will agree with him, but because it is a very interesting historical look at the inside workings of the Republican party and a presidency plagued by self-destructive tendencies.

    I would warn prospective readers that the author speaks fondly (and consistantly defends) such unlta-conservatives as Ann Coulter, Don Rumsfeld, and the most conservative members of congress. If you strongly disagree with this approving view, you will find some views of the author to be frustrating. I would urge you to look past those views to fully appreciate the historical significance of the story and the observations.

    On a personal note, I thoroughly enjoyed his perspective on the 2008 election, and specifically his views on one Sarah Palin. I wont give away the specifics, but I felt quite vindicated that I could find common ground with such a conservative individual as Mr. Latimer.

    Summery: An excellent and candid perspective on a career in politics as a Republican. Very little "liberal bashing," so Liberals should feel safe reading and appreciating this book.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    H Tampa, FL, USA 01-31-10
    H Tampa, FL, USA 01-31-10 Member Since 2002
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    18
    4
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Good Book, Poor Narration"

    The book is interesting and well-written. I've recommended it to friends who are interested in communication and politics...but that narrator REEKS. Unlike a previous reviewer, I did not find him arrogant, rather I found him consistently LAME. His wimpy style did not work in this piece and he does the writer a disservice.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    ushibito 10-10-09
    ushibito 10-10-09 Member Since 2005
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    13
    1
    Overall
    "Idealist Meets Reality"

    Political junkies will enjoy this book -- liberals will rejoice over the skewering of Karl Rove but gnash teeth over the worship of Don Rumsfeld. Conservatives will also have mixed feelings over the betrayal of confidences.

    The choice of Lincoln Hoppe as the reader seems inspired as he captures Lattimer's voice(tone)and that of George W. Bush.

    The frequent references of TV and movie characters offers a glimpse into Lattimer's worldview as one in which most problems can be resolved in 22 minutes.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dan El Paso, TX, United States 09-26-09
    Dan El Paso, TX, United States 09-26-09 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
    335
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    835
    164
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    11
    0
    Overall
    "Weak"

    The best parts of the book is when the author quotes someone else. Unfortunely, most of the book seems to revolve around what a great speech-writer he is, and how the other speech writers are jealous.

    Also, I think he often misses the joke, when he recalls his employer's words literally.

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    A. Rabin Seattle, WA USA 10-13-09
    A. Rabin Seattle, WA USA 10-13-09 Member Since 2008

    SeattleBookie

    HELPFUL VOTES
    6
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    22
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Good book but the most annoying narrator!"

    This is a great book. Highly recommend it. But I was glad it was finished (the audio book that is) because the narrator's tone was the MOST annoying I have ever experienced. It was narrated in a glib, sarcastic, and at times arrogant tone. It sounded like that annoying guy in the old Isuzu commercials. I could not take it. I dont know if the author intended that tone in the writing or it was creative license, but do sample the audio before you buy and know that the tone you hear is throughout the audiobook. I would have recommended a more narrative style with maybe some dry humor, but not the relentless sarcastic pantameter!

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeff Fayetteville, Argentina 10-05-09
    Jeff Fayetteville, Argentina 10-05-09
    HELPFUL VOTES
    60
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    18
    8
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "huh?"

    Told from the perspective of a man who was something that amounted to a page in the white house, we are graced with his perspectives and opinions on politics, current events, and modern historical figures. The book came across as childish and the only thing that could have devalued the narration was the narrator himself. I was surprised to find that it was not the author actually reading the book. Very poor on both ends. I learned about this book through a Fresh air interview. The interview was much better than the book. The portions with Rumsfield were somewhat insightful but that was always clouded by the writer's shallow perspectives. You will find no major speeches authored by this fellow. He was more of a cue card type of writer making cocktail blurbs for famous people.

    On the other hand, folks who are fans of Sarah Palin will find this a literary masterpiece.

    2 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-6 of 6 results

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.