We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
Mark Twain: Man in White: The Grand Adventure of His Final Years | [Michael Shelden]

Mark Twain: Man in White: The Grand Adventure of His Final Years

Pulitzer Prize finalist Michael Shelden illuminates Mark Twain’s twilight years in this brilliant account of the legendary author’s life. Drawing heavily on Twain’s own letters and journals, Mark Twain: Man in White recounts both Twain’s private family experiences and his larger-than-life public image.
Regular Price:$34.99
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

Pulitzer Prize finalist Michael Shelden illuminates Mark Twain’s twilight years in this brilliant account of the legendary author’s life. Drawing heavily on Twain’s own letters and journals, Mark Twain: Man in White recounts both Twain’s private family experiences and his larger-than-life public image.

©2010 Michael Shelden (P)2010 Recorded Books, LLC

What the Critics Say

"Here is a well-researched book for all Twainiacs as well as those coming to the subject's late years for the first time." (Publishers Weekly)

"[Twain's] wit ultimately reflects personal resilience in the face of financial reverses and family tragedy. Even on his deathbed, Twain rallies to bid farewell with wisecracks. Impressive scholarship delivers the authentic accents of a truly American voice." (Booklist)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.3 (46 )
5 star
 (22)
4 star
 (17)
3 star
 (6)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (0)
Overall
4.3 (24 )
5 star
 (11)
4 star
 (11)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (2)
1 star
 (0)
Story
4.4 (23 )
5 star
 (13)
4 star
 (8)
3 star
 (1)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (0)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Tad Davis Philadelphia, PA USA 08-23-10
    Tad Davis Philadelphia, PA USA 08-23-10
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3327
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1590
    251
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    2561
    11
    Overall
    "Fantastic book"

    Shelden's book about the last period of Mark Twain's life is one of the best books about Twain I've ever read. Incidents that are often reduced to summary sentences (like the burglary of Twain's home Stormfield) are here given full (and exciting) narrative treatment. The people surrounding Twain, usually treated as second-class citizens or even footnotes, emerge as living people: his surviving daughters, Clara and Jean; his secretary Isabel Lyon; his financial champion Henry Rogers; even the two men who break into Stormfield, only to flee in a hail of gunfire. (They were later caught and tried, and Twain testified at the trial.)

    Shelden goes to great lengths to counter the image of Twain as a bitter and isolated old man. This was no King Lear, raging at the gods in broken grandeur. Yes, there were dark moments in Twain's writing, and they grew darker as he grew older, and Shelden takes it into account; but he also traces Twain's movements and interactions in great detail: and Twain was a man who, to the end of his life, was ALWAYS moving and interacting. Shelden also gains perspective by comparing some of these darker writings to similar attitudes expressed throughout Twain's life. The contrast isn't so much between Twain the young and happy humorist and Twain the old and bitter philosopher; it's between Twain the life-long bitter philosopher and Twain the convivial host, cat-lover, and incorrigible practical joker.

    Andrew Garman's narration is excellent. I highly recommend the book.

    My only regret is that one of the loveliest images in the published book didn't, and couldn't, make it into the audiobook. The book includes a photograph of Twain on Rogers' yacht -- he actually did a fair amount of sailing with Rogers in those last years -- teeth clamped down on a cigar, bowler hat on head, grinning like a monkey. Some misanthrope.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Wiregrass18 Alabama, United States 09-27-12
    Wiregrass18 Alabama, United States 09-27-12 Member Since 2010

    Wiregrass18

    HELPFUL VOTES
    7
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    9
    7
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A great look at Twain"

    The book is well researched and beautifully written. The author has a deep understanding and appreciation of Twain. The story arc is a sad but rich one--the older Twain facing the prospect of his own death and trying to live out his remaining days as fully as he can. Twain's exuberance and irrepressible wit crash continually against the realities of illness, betrayals of trust, the death of friends, and the struggles of children. There is a great sense of humanity in the book that I found interesting and enriching, in addition to the insight it offers into the life of one America's most interesting men. The narration was close to perfect.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Roy Beaumont, TX, United States 02-09-11
    Roy Beaumont, TX, United States 02-09-11 Member Since 2005
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1718
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    471
    273
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    536
    0
    Overall
    "Mark Twain's Final Years"

    Michael Shelden in "Mark Twain: Man in White: The Grand Adventure of His Final Years" has made a welcome addition to what I label the "sunset years genre." In this book, Sheldon follows Mark Twain in his last few years of life allowing the reader to catch a glimpse of how a great man and author spent his last days on earth. The first half of the book digresses a few times relating stories of individuals who had a tangential entrrance into Twain's life, but those are also interesting. Most interesting is the second half which relates how Twain was cheated by trusted associates and family difficulties which he faced. The final chapters detailing his angina and final death are touching. Another book which relates the last years of an individual is David Eisenhower's memoir "Going Home to Glory" about his grandfather's post presidential years and his death. This book is also available from Audible and well worth the reader's time. Andrew Garman does an outstanding job reading "Mark Twain: Man in White."

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Daniel Modesto, CA, United States 10-18-10
    Daniel Modesto, CA, United States 10-18-10
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    13
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Excellent."

    This is an excellent book on the later years of Mark Twain's life. The anecdotes and tracking of Twain's later years inspired in me a new appreciation for the man and his brand of comedy. It created in interest in his stories that I did not previously have. The story is well read by Mr. Garman and he does not make a mockery of Twain nor of the book. Worth the listen to writers and fans of Mark Twain's work.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-4 of 4 results

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.