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Lords of Finance Audiobook

Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World

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Publisher's Summary

Pulitzer Prize, History, 2010

It is commonly believed that the Great Depression that began in 1929 resulted from a confluence of events beyond any one person's or government's control. In fact, as Liaquat Ahamed reveals, it was the decisions made by a small number of central bankers that were the primary cause of the economic meltdown, the effects of which set the stage for World War II and reverberated for decades.

In Lords of Finance, we meet the neurotic and enigmatic Montagu Norman of the Bank of England, the xenophobic and suspicious Émile Moreau of the Banque de France, the arrogant yet brilliant Hjalmar Schacht of the Reichsbank, and Benjamin Strong of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, whose facade of energy and drive masked a deeply wounded and overburdened man.

After the First World War, these central bankers attempted to reconstruct the world of international finance. Despite their differences, they were united by a common fear - that the greatest threat to capitalism was inflation - and by a common vision that the solution was to turn back the clock and return the world to the gold standard. For a brief period in the mid-1920s, they appeared to have succeeded. The world's currencies were stabilized, and capital began flowing freely across the globe. But beneath the veneer of boomtown prosperity, cracks started to appear in the financial system. The gold standard that all had believed would provide an umbrella of stability proved to be a straitjacket, and the world economy began that terrible downward spiral known as the Great Depression.

As yet another period of economic turmoil makes headlines today, the Great Depression and the year 1929 remain the benchmark for true financial mayhem. Offering a new understanding of the global nature of financial crises, Lords of Finance is a reminder of the enormous impact that the decisions of central bankers can have, of their fallibility, and of the terrible human consequences that can result when they are wrong.

©2009 Liaquat Ahamed; (P)2009 Tantor

What the Critics Say

"Ahamed cannot have foreseen how timely his book would be.....Lords of Finance is highly readable - enlivened by vivid biographical detail but soundly based on the literature. That it should appear now, as history threatens to repeat itself, compounds its appeal." (Financial Times)
"Erudite, entertaining macroeconomic history of the lead-up to the Great Depression as seen through the careers of the West's principal bankers....Spellbinding, insightful and, perhaps most important, timely." (Kirkus Reviews)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

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  •  
    Barry Petaluma, CA, United States 10-24-12
    Barry Petaluma, CA, United States 10-24-12 Member Since 2008

    My interests run to psychology, popular science, history, world literature, and occasionally something fun like Jasper Fforde. It seems like the only free time I have for reading these days is when I'm in the car so I am extremely grateful for audio books. I started off reading just the contemporary stuff that I was determined not to clutter up my already stuffed bookcases with. And now audio is probably 90% of my "reading" matter.

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    "It's always about the Economy"

    Too many history books give short shrift to the role of finances on the course of history. This book fills in a major plot hole about what went on between the two world wars. Ahamed does a great job of giving us a play-by-play of how the major central banks attempted to respond to events, including a clear picture of how the decision making process was affected by individual personalities and legacy dogma from the past. I wish the author had interspersed more of his analysis with the main text instead of saving it for the end. Ahamed builds a strong case that the gold standard was a key factor leading to dysfunctional decisions. As far as building a case that these bankers bungled their jobs, he would do better if he could come up with decisions that would have led to a better outcome. As it is, he shows people boxed in by circumstances beyond their control. In most of the situations he goes over, it appears they made the best choice available to them, and that in itself makes for a compelling if tragic story.

    In fact, I wish more time had been spent on analysis overall. An economics book targeted at the mainstream audience should at least spend more time explaining about the balance of payments, and about how the trading in government securities affects trade in the private sector. But these are relatively minor complaints.

    Stephen Hoye is not my favorite narrator. He has one of those superior sounding voices that imply he knows what he's talking about. I understand some people find that reassuring. If hearing someone read a book on economics and referring to "John Maynard KEENZ" all the way through doesn't bother you, then maybe you won't mind Mr. Hoye's narration. I found the British accent annoying, as he used the same one for every British person in the story, from Churchill to Keynes. Yet the other nationalities were either very mild or nonexistent as far as accents go.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Lynn 11-27-11
    Lynn 11-27-11
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    "déjà vu all over again"

    In Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World, Liaquat Ahamed sets out to explain how the decisions of a a handful of central bankers in the US, England, France, and Germany brought us the Great Depression of 1929. An economist for the World Bank, Ahamed presents a story filled with interesting characters, mishandled events, and analysis easily followed by any reader. Front and center, is the Gold Standard which stabilized currencies, but also prolonged the economic malaise. Circumstances beyond anyone’s control propelled the downward economic spiral and magnified the decisions of key bankers making the problems much worse. There is a lot here only applicable and related to the crash of 1929. However, there is also much here which brings a sense of déjà vu to our current economic circumstance. Readers will be encouraged that we have gotten through these times before. Readers may also be reminded that things could be worse. The reading of Stephen Hoye is a plus.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
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    Stephen Moroni, UT, United States 10-11-10
    Stephen Moroni, UT, United States 10-11-10 Member Since 2002
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    "Very informative and educational book!"

    I enjoyed getting to learn about each of the Bankers. About their strengths and weaknesses, but also their egos. The book also explain that if most of the nations involved would have been willing to do things a little differently WWII may have been prevented.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
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    Kindle Customer Fairfield, CT, United States 05-14-16
    Kindle Customer Fairfield, CT, United States 05-14-16 Member Since 2009
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    "Wow, there was a lot in there"

    Given recent economic events, it's fascinating to see what has happened and been done before. This book is fascinating but be prepared for a lot of information during a difficult time in world history.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    emilio squillante 04-07-16 Member Since 2016
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    "You know squat re what caused the Great Depression"
    What did you love best about Lords of Finance?

    Opened my eyes the way the media should have been didn't. Not even close. Irregardless of your background/interests you cannot read this book without becoming emotional.


    What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

    Spoiler alert: it wasn't the stock market crashing that caused the Great Depression. Yoiks! Talk about history repeating itself. I have no background in finance or economics but do now: after reading Sylvia Nassar's "Grand Pursuit" (good beginning and end but my interest waned in mid to last quarter) followed by LoF (preferred LoF much more) I feel entitled to an opinion on the feckless leadership between Wilson and Truman administrations. High school, college students and people I regard as literate are oblivious to the post WWI flight of gold from the Bank of New York to the Exchequer, an unbelievable racking up of bad loans to prop Britain's pound by that axis of evil Montagu Norman and Strong, may they burn forever (when you read this book I dare you to remain non-judgemental). Citizens will find this remarkable given that recent bad bit of luck in the subprimes, AG and S sleepwalking all the while despite poor B. Bourne banging the alarm. Funny, nobody went to jail in either depression. Maybe you should read this book and do your part to prevent the next humiliating repetition?


    Which scene was your favorite?

    Can finance be fascinating? Yes! Both the author and narrator pulled this rabbit out of a hat. Most commendable.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    Some facts were incredulous but the narrator maintained equanimity and balance. How did you muster self control? It's okay to react when people do foolish things. Let yourself go.


    Any additional comments?

    Can you write another book about another boring subject I know nothing about? I can't believe how interesting and dastardly people who were "looking out for us" were NOT. I'll unhesitatingly buy it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    R. A. Steele Austin, Texas 02-11-16
    R. A. Steele Austin, Texas 02-11-16 Member Since 2014

    Don't get me started.

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    "Now I Think I Understand"

    Spitting the phrase "Keynesian Economics" with contempt simply shows your lack of understanding. Keynes was the only figure of authority who understood how the gold standard strangled economics post world war one.

    A fact which this book adequately lays out the case for. More than that it shows how the knowledge of the old system hamstrung the men of authority between the wars, keeping them from solving the financial crisis of the Great Depression.

    It also touches on how FDR's complete lack of understanding of the gold standard actually lead to a reinvention of economics through the second world war and beyond.

    A excellent view into financial history which should be required reading for anyone attempting to understand the subject.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    David I. Biondo 02-10-16 Member Since 2015
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    "Valuable knowledge in the current environment"

    De javu for those who follow today's world markets. Well done! I would have like more information on 31-37. Excellent read.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Henry 02-04-16
    Henry 02-04-16
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    "An excellent book"

    Very well narrated. Excellent material presented in a manner you want to listen to--more than once. Highly recommended.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    AG New York, NY 08-10-15
    AG New York, NY 08-10-15
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    "Highly recommended"

    This was a very pleasurable listening experience of a fascinating and riveting economic history Europe and the United States in the period spanning the two world wars.

    The audiobook is unabridged and consequently quite long at over 17 hours. It took me about a month to get through but didn't ever feel like dragging.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Gillis Heller The Peak, SAR Hong Kong 08-05-15
    Gillis Heller The Peak, SAR Hong Kong 08-05-15 Member Since 2013

    gheller57

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    "Great narration adds to great story"

    The narration uses a 1920's and 1930's American radio announcer voice that is perfect for this story. The humor is delivered deadpan.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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