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Inside Scientology Audiobook

Inside Scientology: The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion

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Audible Editor Reviews

Janet Reitman's Inside Scientology seeks to provide the first unbiased and holistic overview of the divisive faith that is Scientology. Reitman focuses on five key elements of the Scientology story: a history of the religion's rise, as well as the rise of its creator, L. Ron Hubbard; a detailed account of the vicious internal coup by current leader, David Miscavige; the sad and shocking story of the death of Scientologist Lisa McPherson; an outline of the controversial "celebrity strategy"; and multiple narratives detailing the current mass exodus from a corrupt and abusive church.

Narrator Stephen Hoye does an excellent job with the book, which presents many unique challenges. He successfully tackles a wide range of subject matter from Hubbard's sterile, futurist terminology to some of the more personal, emotionally gripping stories. Hoye serves as a calm voice of reason, guiding us through a potentially confusing world of Orgs, Tech, and more acroynms than a high-level business meeting.

The picture that emerges is a multifaceted one. Outsiders with cursory knowledge of the faith generally associate it with a crackpot Sci-Fi writer looking to make a buck, brainwashing techniques, salacious scandals, never-ending lawsuits, and a creation myth featuring aliens, volcanoes, and movie theaters. While Reitman doesn't exactly dispel these notions completely, she does provide rich historical background and a true look inside this mysterious faith. The truth about the religion, after all, is much more complex than what's presented on the surface.

The promises of Scientology range from the enriching (freedom from mental and emotion anguish) to the humanitarian (providing aid to developing countries and ways out of drug addiction) to the transcendent (immortal life, free of an earthy body). While people are drawn to the faith for all kinds of reasons, Reitman shows us that most Scientologists are just normal people trying to do good in the world and better themselves. Unfortunately, some of these people have been swept up in a devastating new movement within the upper ranks of the church, which has become increasingly obsessed with greed, domination, and power.

Perhaps the most artful facet of this book is that, in true journalistic style, Reitman does her best to simply present the facts and leave the conclusions to the listener. After all, like Hubbard used to say, "What's true is what is true for you." —Gina Pensiero

Publisher's Summary

Scientology, created in 1954 by a prolific sci-fi writer named L. Ron Hubbard, claims to be the world's fastest-growing religion, with millions of members around the world and huge financial holdings. Its celebrity believers keep its profile high, and its teams of "volunteer ministers" offer aid at disaster sites such as Haiti and the World Trade Center. But Scientology is also a notably closed faith, harassing journalists and others through litigation and intimidation, even infiltrating the highest levels of government to further its goals. Its attacks on psychiatry and its requirement that believers pay as much as tens and even hundreds of thousands of dollars for salvation have drawn scrutiny and skepticism. And ex-members use the Internet to share stories of harassment and abuse.

Now Janet Reitman offers the first full journalistic history of the Church of Scientology, in an even-handed account that at last establishes the astonishing truth about the controversial religion. She traces Scientology's development from the birth of Dianetics to today, following its metamorphosis from a pseudoscientific self-help group to a worldwide spiritual corporation with profound control over its followers and even ex-followers.

Based on five years of research, unprecedented access to church officials, confidential documents, and extensive interviews with current and former Scientologists, this is the defining book about a little-known world.

©2011 Janet Reitman (P)2011 Tantor

What the Critics Say

"A detailed and readable examination of the life of L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of the church, and his successor, David Miscavige." (Publishers Weekly)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

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  •  
    Amanda Phoenix, AZ, United States 07-03-12
    Amanda Phoenix, AZ, United States 07-03-12

    I rate as follows: 5 Stars = Loved it. 4 Stars = Really liked it. 3 Stars = Liked it. 2 Stars = Didn't like it. 1 Star = Hated it.

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    "The Religion That Wasn't"

    It continues to amaze me how my reading habits seem to line up with the other reviewers that I follow; with that in mind, let me say that Melinda just wrote an excellent review on this book yesterday; so I'm just going to add my additional two cents.

    I want to stress that as a religious person myself, I know there is a HUGE difference between what an individual person interprets their religious views to be and the actions of some people running the "church institution". Religion is the set of beliefs in an individual's heart and mind that guides them to be the best person they can be. Churches are fallible, man made organizations that are susceptible to corruption. When I reference Scientology here, I'm referring to the fallible man-made organization, not any individual that uses that word to describe the set of beliefs they use to to guide them in trying to be kind and useful.

    As referenced in other reviews, this can be DRY reading. I especially had trouble getting through the first two or so hours; I thought I wasn't going to make it. Then it picked up a little and became more interesting, while still admittedly dry. I hovered between giving the narration a 2 or a 3, but decided that My Hoye did the best he could have with the material he was working with.

    I found it fascinating that Scientology was never meant to be a religion; that it was always a money making scheme, and they decided to categorize it as a church to avoid the regulatory issues they were having with the fact that their "councilors" had no legitimate accreditation, and also to avoid paying taxes. Saying they were a religion helped with both these issues. Being from Phoenix, I also found it fascinating to find out that L Ron Hubbard spent a little time living here while setting up the church, which I'd never known.

    If you're picking up the book because of certain current events going on in the news, particularly a certain divorce in the headlines, I'll admit this book gives you a lot of information regarding some of the specific concerns or accusations that are flying out there. In particular, the book spends a good deal of time going over the inception and first few years of "Sea Org", which is the ship based program that (if you believe the stories) is one of the main concerns in the current divorce; the fact that the mother is concerned that her daughter was soon to be sent to this program.

    The other big take away I had from the book is how little L Ron Hubbard had to do with what the church is currently; how out of touch with it he was in his last years of life, with other power players taking the helm.

    Do you want to read this? I don't know. It's dry, it's very detailed, but I'm glad I did; I found the information was good and it gave me a lot that I didn't know before. It's certainly not a light beach read, but if you're really interested in learning more about how this organization morphed into what it is, it certainly gives you that.

    12 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Matthew NORFOLK, VA, United States 10-02-12
    Matthew NORFOLK, VA, United States 10-02-12 Member Since 2012
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    "Not Disappointed"
    Would you consider the audio edition of Inside Scientology to be better than the print version?

    I never read the print version.


    What other book might you compare Inside Scientology to and why?

    Alice in Wonderland. Things get weirder the further in you get.


    What does Stephen Hoye bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    He brings a nice cadence to the story.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Yes.


    Any additional comments?

    Janet Reitman says at the beginning that she is trying to present a fair and objective history of Scientology.

    In spite of her best efforts, she can't dispel the notion that you can't spell "crazy" without "Scientology."

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Graeme Sydney, Australia 12-14-11
    Graeme Sydney, Australia 12-14-11 Member Since 2011
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    "A book that outrages, horrifies and mystifies"

    As you listen to this book you wonder just HOW so people can give their lives and souls to such a corrupt organisation and laughably silly "religion". You will hear how absolute power does indeed corrupt absolutely. The narration is excellent considering this is non-fiction - the narrator captures the emotions and desperation of some of the protagonists of the account very well.
    Despite Scientology providing so ammunition for the author to attack with, the author does try credibly well to produce an balanced account - indeed some of the "pro" Scientology accounts are some of the most interesting parts of the book - where current Scientologists come across as deluded optimists. The scariest part of the book was in the final few pages when a current 2nd generation Scientologist declares they want to study law and be a judge. After listening to this book, you want no one from this religion in any kind of position of authority, let alone a judge!

    7 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    ghorowitz3 New York 08-17-11
    ghorowitz3 New York 08-17-11 Member Since 2017
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    "Brilliantly done, eye-opening and riveting"

    Reitman has given us a masterfully researched and compellingly written book. I found it riveting and impossible to stop listening. Very well read as well.

    15 of 18 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Christopher Boulder, CO, United States 07-15-11
    Christopher Boulder, CO, United States 07-15-11

    I am a co-author of The Cluetrain Manifesto, and author of Gonzo Marketing: Winning Through Worst Practices, and The Bombast Transcripts.

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    "an *important* book"

    This is an excellent unpacking of one of America's foremost cultural train wrecks. I hope it's true that the power and reach of this twisted organization are on the wane, but I'm not holding my breath. I knew about some of the material in this book, but a lot less than I thought I did. The chapters on the murder of Lisa McPherson are especially gripping - and tragic. btw, the narrator also read The Black Dahlia by James Ellroy, which leant this an extra measure of creepiness for me.

    39 of 49 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Laura - Audible New York, NY 01-08-15
    Laura - Audible New York, NY 01-08-15
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    "Informative and Interesting"
    Any additional comments?

    This book gave comprehensive and unbiased insight into Scientology. Beginning with LRH's biography, this work was an easy-to-follow examination of the "religion".

    Through Reitman's work, we see how Scientology has evolved from the 50's to present day. We hear from ex-scientologists, current scientologists, and obtain a deeper understanding of the bizarre and abstruse movement.

    An informative and engrossing listen - I would recommend to anyone who has ever been perplexed by the continued existence of Scientology.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kristi Richardson Milwaukie, OR, United States 05-14-13
    Kristi Richardson Milwaukie, OR, United States 05-14-13

    An old broad that enjoys books of all types. Would rather read than write reviews though. I know what I like, and won't be bothered by crap.

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    "Enthralling story of Scientology!"
    Where does Inside Scientology rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    Most of this information was new to me. I have heard of Scientology and even experienced some of their tactics to get me to join in the 70's, but I knew little of the beginnings and dirty dealings of this so called religion. This book was an eye opener to me. I was engrossed in this book for a lot of the time.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Inside Scientology?

    When the book gets into the death of Lisa McPherson, it's like an Ann Rule true crime book. I listened straight through that section, dreading what was going to happen to her. I won't forget that for along time.


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    Mr. Hoye was adequate. Not great.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    When the woman whose husband had left Scientology finally is able to escape from the church by jumping over the wall and finding her husband waiting on the other side I almost cried. I can't remember all of their names but that whole section was a tear jerker.


    Any additional comments?

    I enjoyed this book and learned a lot about the beliefs and tactics of Scientology. It's hard for me to believe they get away with this kind of stuff. To me it's not a religion but a self help group out to make money and not pay taxes.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    JLH Queen Creek, AZ United States 03-31-13
    JLH Queen Creek, AZ United States 03-31-13 Member Since 2011

    Arizona Reader

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    "Very Enlightening"
    Would you consider the audio edition of Inside Scientology to be better than the print version?

    Haven't read the print version -- the audio version kept me listening long after I should have turned it off and started doing something else!


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    There was no favorite character -- the people described in story range from kind of pathetic to downright scary. I've heard many negative things over the years about Scientology, this just confirmed what I've heard in the past. I finished the book wondering how anyone could be pulled into such a money-centric "church".


    Have you listened to any of Stephen Hoye’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    Haven't listened to any of his other books. He did a great job reading this one.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I didn't laugh or cry, I just kept asking myself, "how could anyone get pulled into this organization, and not see Scientology for what it is -- a huge money making operation????


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    MAC 03-25-13
    MAC 03-25-13
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    "Riveting"

    I used this as my "commuting" book, and I'm sure I looked a fool, driving down the highway with my jaw hanging open the whole time. The book is a fascinating glimpse into this movement--fascinating and disturbing--and seems to be unbiased in its research. The narration was also well-done, in my opinion, and I felt the writing was pretty good. The only thing I wished for was an index of the innumerable acronyms, but I realized finally that I didn't really need to keep them straight in order to follow the story--and that was an interesting fact, in an of itself. I highly recommend this book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Susan K Treiman new york city 03-18-13
    Susan K Treiman new york city 03-18-13

    streiman

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    "Glimpse inside a frightening world"

    Tracing Scientology from its beginning to the present, this book answers many of the questions I've had about this strange belief system, beginning with a look at its founder, L. Ron Hubbard.. Also fascinating: the trial of the Florida woman whose death is, apparently, directly attributable to Scientology -- and the celebrity campaign. The book makes it clear that this is a business, not a religion - and one that employes the most brutal and cutthroat tactics to ensure its profitablilty.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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