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Dreaming in Chinese: Mandarin Lessons in Life, Love, and Language | [Deborah Fallows]

Dreaming in Chinese: Mandarin Lessons in Life, Love, and Language

Deborah Fallows has spent a lot of her life learning languages and traveling around the world. But nothing prepared her for the surprises of learning Mandarin - China's most common language - or the intensity of living in Shanghai and Beijing. Over time, she realized that her struggles and triumphs in studying learning the language of her adopted home provided small clues to deciphering behavior and habits of its people, and its culture's conundrums.
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Audible Editor Reviews

Editors Select, January 2013 - As someone who frequently daydreams of moving to the other side of the world and learning a foreign language (and most likely never will!), I'm finding this book utterly fascinating. The author touches on the subtleties of language - how one word can have several meanings just by the speakers' tone - and how this impacts her interactions while living in Shanghai and Beijing. There are a lot of observations about language in this book, and I'm eager to hear how the narrator captures the journey of learning both the Mandarin Chinese language and culture. —Jessica, Audible Editor

Publisher's Summary

Deborah Fallows has spent a lot of her life learning languages and traveling around the world. But nothing prepared her for the surprises of learning Mandarin - China's most common language - or the intensity of living in Shanghai and Beijing. Over time, she realized that her struggles and triumphs in studying learning the language of her adopted home provided small clues to deciphering behavior and habits of its people, and its culture's conundrums. As her skill with Mandarin increased, bits of the language - a word, a phrase, an oddity of grammar - became windows into understanding romance, humor, protocol, relationships, and the overflowing humanity of modern China.

Fallows learned, for example, that the abrupt, blunt way of speaking which Chinese people sometimes use isn't rudeness, but is, in fact a way to acknowledge and honor the closeness between two friends. She learned that English speakers' trouble with hearing or saying tones - the variations in inflection that can change a word's meaning - is matched by Chinese speakers' inability not to hear tones, or to even take a guess at understanding what might have been meant when foreigners misuse them.

Dreaming in Chinese is the story of what Deborah Fallows discovered about the Chinese language, and how that helped her make sense of what had at first seemed like the chaos and contradiction of everyday life in China.

©2010 Deborah Fallows (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"You don't have to know Mandarin to be captivated by Deborah Fallows's Dreaming in Chinese.... Forget Berlitz - that just teaches words. Deborah Fallows shows us that the cultural implications of those words teach us about each other." (Sara Nelson, O: The Oprah Magazine)

"Fallows has a good ear for aspect, the way of stressing certain words and syllables to change or add layers of meaning to a simple word or phrase. She veers to the gentle, seeing the generosity behind brusque gestures, the intimacy and friendship behind rudeness and the priorities that language reveals. Playfulness, respect, affection and the virtues of solidarity with the common people - a different traveler might miss all these but not Fallows." (Susan Salter Reynolds, Los Angeles Times)

“Narrator Catherine Byers deftly communicates the intricacies and particularities of the language. The accuracy of her Chinese pronunciation and her demonstrations of tones seem authentic, a factor that is important given what Fallows tells us about the difficulty of Chinese pronunciation and the travails she experienced as a result of her missteps in this regard.” (AudioFile)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.6 (56 )
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3.6 (47 )
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Story
3.6 (47 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Catherine Mercer Island, WA, United States 04-24-13
    Catherine Mercer Island, WA, United States 04-24-13 Member Since 2009
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    "Interesting examination of Chinese culture"

    I enjoyed the perspective on Chinese culture from someone who lived there and studied the language. It is probably more interesting for someone who has studied the language, even briefly as I did, than for someone who hasn't studied foreign languages, and particularly Mandarin.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Vicki Menands, NY, United States 02-08-13
    Vicki Menands, NY, United States 02-08-13
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    "Fascinating book"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    I would absolutely recommend the book to anyone who has any interest in China or the Chinese language. It is a deeply insightful book, examining a complex and easily misunderstood culture.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    It was extremely helpful to know that others have struggled as much as I have with Mandarin. And after reading so many China-bashing travelogues, it was lovely to read something from someone who seems to have a genuine affection for the people, the culture and the language. The chapter about the earthquake was genuinely moving, allowing Ms. Fallows' neighbors to emerge as truly, independently human.


    Any additional comments?

    I have only one real complaint. The narrator is perfectly competent -- the enunciates very clearly, and emotes very subtly, which works well for non-fiction. However, given the nature of the book, it is jarring that the narrator makes no effort to pronounce the Chinese phrases correctly. Or perhaps she has made a little effort,but doesn't recognize that even pronunciation in this language requires *great* effort. I'm not being nitpicky or snobbish -- it's not that her Chinese is heavily accented, but that it would be almost incomprehensible to a native speaker. I recognize that it would be difficult to find a reader who has studied any Mandarin. However, she reads the Chinese words as if they were English, which tends to nullify the point of getting this on audiobook rather than in print.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Anna GILMER, TX, United States 02-23-13
    Anna GILMER, TX, United States 02-23-13 Member Since 2011
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    "Interesting, but reflections not deep"

    I enjoyed Deborah Fallows' thoughts but didn't agree with her conclusions, which seemed to me to be generalizations or viewing what was said through a Western lens. I was also disappointed that the narrator struggled to pronounce the Mandarin words. I've studied Chinese part time for four years, and her unclear tones and pronunciation made it hard to picture the words as she said them. I do appreciate her respect for her host culture and the complexity of the language.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Annette Maine, USA 01-18-14
    Annette Maine, USA 01-18-14
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    "Okay story, terrible listen."
    What would have made Dreaming in Chinese better?

    The narrative was mildly interesting, in the sense that some of the author's stories of living in China resonated with my own experiences, but given the title, I was expecting more in-depth language analysis, which it entirely lacks. Plus, there's a fair bit that the author doesn't go on to explain and I imagine would confuse me if I didn't already know more about it. For instance, when she is talking about word play, and the "grass mud horse" she notes that is is a homonym for something else, but doesn't say what. I'll give you that it's really hard to indicate what it's a homonym for in polite language, but she didn't even try.


    How did the narrator detract from the book?

    The real thing that made this book unlistenable (I admit to giving up about an hour and a half in) is that the narrator is a great English reader but clearly doesn't speak a word of Chinese, and no one gave her even a ten minute summary in pinyin phonetics. If I had been smart enough to read the reviews beforehand, I would have seen that. If you have any level of Chinese understanding, you will probably find this audiobook frustrating and grating. Otherwise, either give it a miss or try the print edition.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    James SEATTLE, WA, United States 12-29-13
    James SEATTLE, WA, United States 12-29-13 Member Since 2009
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    "Right On!"

    I thought this was a terrific book written in an enjoyable, upbeat and sometimes humorous manner by the author, Deborah Fallows.

    As one who lives in China for most of the year, I can see firsthand what she shares with us, especially in regards to name selection, mate selection, social orders of the day, and so much more.

    The author also does a great job in helping us to understand and even learn a few Chinese words along the way.

    I highly recommend this book whether you’re planning on going to China or just want to learn a few more things about China.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Aaron SAN JOSE, CA, United States 09-09-13
    Aaron SAN JOSE, CA, United States 09-09-13
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    "brought back memories of my time in China"
    Would you try another book from Deborah Fallows and/or Catherine Byers?

    Maybe. I enjoyed the book. I lived in China approximately the same time that Ms Fallows was there, and also studied Chinese. It was entertaining, and brought back memories of my time there.

    As others have noted, the fact that the narrator doesn't speak Chinese was surprisingly annoying. Perhaps it's difficult to find bilingual person to narrate a book, but if there were ever a book that called for it, it's this one.


    How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

    The story was good, again entertaining. It did leave me wanting more, perhaps bringing more of her scholarly background into the story, or more personal reflections. And, perhaps I'm an atypical reader, having spent about the same time as she did in China, and obtaining some level of proficiency in Chinese, and of course being curious about living in a foreign place. I often thought that it was a book that I could have written (and maybe I could have!)


    Would you be willing to try another one of Catherine Byers’s performances?

    Yes, but not if she needs foreign language knowledge. I think she was a good pick in the sense she sounds like I envision Ms Fallows.


    Do you think Dreaming in Chinese needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    Perhaps if Ms Fallows travels to another country, another book would be appropriate.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Traci Chicago, IL, United States 05-06-13
    Traci Chicago, IL, United States 05-06-13 Member Since 2011
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    "Lesson in Chinese Culture"
    If you could sum up Dreaming in Chinese in three words, what would they be?

    It's a nice story, and a way to learn more about the Chinese language through Chinese culture.


    How did the narrator detract from the book?

    The narrator has a nice, sentimental, warm tone in the book, but the Chinese was almost unrecognizable.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No


    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
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