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Deal with the Devil: The FBI's Secret Thirty-Year Relationship with a Mafia Killer | [Peter Lance]

Deal with the Devil: The FBI's Secret Thirty-Year Relationship with a Mafia Killer

In Deal with the Devil, five-time Emmy Award-winning investigative reporter Peter Lance draws on once-secret FBI files and exclusive new interviews to disclose the epic saga of Colombo family capo Gregory Scarpa, Sr., who spent more than 30 years as a paid Top-Echelon FBI informant while wreaking havoc as a drug dealer, loan shark, bank robber, hijacker, high-end securities thief - and killer. A Mafia capo who "stopped counting" after 50 murders, Greg Scarpa was enlisted by the FBI as early as 1960.
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Publisher's Summary

From an award-winning investigative reporter: the shocking story of the mob killer who terrorized the streets of New York City for decades...while working for the FBI.

In Deal with the Devil, five-time Emmy Award-winning investigative reporter Peter Lance draws on three decades of once-secret FBI files and exclusive new interviews to disclose the epic saga of Colombo family capo Gregory Scarpa, Sr., who spent more than 30 years as a paid top-echelon FBI informant while wreaking havoc as a drug dealer, loan shark, bank robber, hijacker, high-end securities thief - and killer.

A Mafia capo who "stopped counting" after 50 murders - earning nicknames including "the Grim Reaper" and "the Killing Machine" - Greg Scarpa was enlisted by the FBI as early as 1960. His detailed debriefings on Mafia practices and activities went straight to J. Edgar Hoover and revealed the structure of Cosa Nostra long before the celebrated Valachi hearings. In 42 years of murder and racketeering, Scarpa served only 30 days in jail, thanks to his secret relationship with the Feds. But Scarpa's most deadly reign of terror came in the period from 1980 to 1992, when more than half his homicides occurred - even as Scarpa was serving as a paid informant under Supervisory Special Agent R. Lindley DeVecchio, who ran two organized crime squads in the FBI's New York Office.

The celebrated case agent on the 1985-1986 Mafia Commission prosecution, DeVecchio had persuaded Scarpa to return to the fold as an informant, under laws that explicitly forbid organized crime insiders from committing murder or other crimes while receiving compensation from the Bureau. And yet, drawing on secret memos that went to every FBI director from Hoover to Louis Freeh, Lance documents that Scarpa not only continued his violent rampage during these years, but actually launched a new war for control of the Colombo crime family - a conflict that left 12 dead and dozens injured.

Before he died of AIDS, contracted through a tainted blood transfusion, Scarpa committed or ordered 26 murders - including the violent rubout of his own brother Sal in 1987 and the drive-by slaying of his nephew Gus Farace, which triggered a 500-agent manhunt - all while serving as an informant for Lin DeVecchio. When DeVecchio himself was indicted on four counts of murder in 2007, Brooklyn DA Charles Hynes called the case "the most stunning example of official corruption... I have ever seen." Yet the murder charges against DeVecchio were dismissed a short time later - even as a New York State Supreme Court judge described the FBI's association with Scarpa as a "deal with the devil."

After the case's abrupt dismissal, Lance started peeling back the layers on what defense attorneys called Scarpa's "unholy alliance" with the FBI. Through exclusive interviews with Scarpa's son, Greg Jr., and former Lucchese boss Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso, among others, as well as more than 1,150 pages of confidential briefing memos, many revealed here for the first time, Lance traces links between the Scarpa case, the infamous Mafia Cops case, and more.

Written with the same astounding capacity for penetrating criminal networks that marked Lance's previous books, Deal with the Devil is a page-turning work of investigative journalism that reads like a Scorsese film.

©2013 Tenacity Media Group Ltd. (P)2013 HarperCollinsPublishers

What Members Say

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  •  
    SCOTT LOVELAND, CO, United States 07-15-13
    SCOTT LOVELAND, CO, United States 07-15-13 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
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    "Great story line not so great narration"
    How did the narrator detract from the book?

    The "quote" " end quote" got so old" had dick hill or others read the book it would have been masterful!


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Colman Redfern. NSW 2016, Australia 05-31-14
    Colman Redfern. NSW 2016, Australia 05-31-14 Member Since 2014
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    4
    4
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Way too much information, no story."
    Would you try another book from Peter Lance and/or Peter Lance?

    No


    What was most disappointing about Peter Lance’s story?

    It's amazing how little the writer knows how to put together a story. It is painfully boring and it really doesn't need to be


    How could the performance have been better?

    Instead of writing facts and statements, tell a story..doh!


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Deal with the Devil?

    The whole lot


    Any additional comments?

    How can anyone think this is entertaining ?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeremy P. Buchan Los Angeles, CA United States 05-01-14
    Jeremy P. Buchan Los Angeles, CA United States 05-01-14 Member Since 2012
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    9
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Quote"
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    If i ever hear someone say "Quote" again i might kill myself. i think peter lance says the word "Quote" about 20,000 times during the reading. It was so bad, i didn't even finish listening. sad. Should be such a good story.


    How did the narrator detract from the book?

    the tone of his voice, and using the word Quote almost every time he reads a sentence.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Chris Midlothian, VA, United States 10-23-13
    Chris Midlothian, VA, United States 10-23-13 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
    12
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    "Way too long"
    What disappointed you about Deal with the Devil?

    This is like a dissertation on the mob, it has too many facts and figures and is not a compelling enough story.


    Would you ever listen to anything by Peter Lance again?

    Yes


    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
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