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Confessions of an Economic Hitman | [John Perkins]

Confessions of an Economic Hitman

"Economic hit men," John Perkins writes, "are highly paid professionals who cheat countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars. Their tools include fraudulent financial reports, rigged elections, payoffs, extortion, sex, and murder."
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Publisher's Summary

This is the inside story of how America turned from a respected republic into a feared empire.

"Economic hit men," John Perkins writes, "are highly paid professionals who cheat countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars. Their tools include fraudulent financial reports, rigged elections, payoffs, extortion, sex, and murder."

John Perkins should know; he was an economic hit man. His job was to convince countries that are strategically important to the U.S., from Indonesia to Panama, to accept enormous loans for infrastructure development and to make sure that the lucrative projects were contracted to Halliburton, Bechtel, Brown and Root, and other United States engineering and construction companies. Saddled with huge debts, these countries came under the control of the United States government, World Bank, and other U.S.-dominated aid agencies that acted like loan sharks, dictating repayment terms and bullying foreign governments into submission.

This extraordinary real-life tale exposes international intrigue, corruption, and little-known government and corporate activities that have dire consequences for American democracy and the world.

Listen to John Perkins discuss the book on To the Best of Our Knowledge.

©2004 John Perkins; (P)2005 Blackstone Audiobooks

What Members Say

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Performance
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  •  
    Robert P. 06-24-09
    Robert P. 06-24-09 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Excellent Story for people have traveled"

    I listened to the entire story before even looking at the reviews. While I felt the story did repeat a couple of parts and could have been condensed a tiny bit that was not what any of the complaints were even about. As someone who has spent 8 years traveling all over the world with the vast majority of that time being in asia for a large corporation, I can completely buy into most of this book. Given what I have seen and experienced first hand along with the time frame the story takes place it does not seem to be outlandish or unbelievable as was commented. In fact I find the opposite to be true. It explains things to me I have seen in a way that makes sense. I can not confirm that the story is 100% true but it is worth your time to read. It will help you open your mind to outside thought from the mainstream media. I would overall give this a 4* review but I felt it was worthy of the bump due to all the 1* which were based on not even listening to the entire thing.

    25 of 26 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Yousuf Mississauga, ON, Canada 06-12-07
    Yousuf Mississauga, ON, Canada 06-12-07 Member Since 2004
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    "Intriguing"

    The narration is not suited to this text, and, it seems, detracts from the force of the words. The content is so bold in its claims that it leaves one wondering how much is real and how much is embellished. At all rates, this work offers an intriguing framework for critiquing corporate interests in global politics.

    9 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Daniel Camarillo, CA, USA 02-21-10
    Daniel Camarillo, CA, USA 02-21-10
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Why the US is hated worldwide"

    This is an eye opener for all those people that think the US is only trying to help the rest of the world. These "confessions" show how we manipulate countries in development so they can't grow.
    Don't get me wrong, the US has done MORE THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY to rid the world of invasionist countries and we can be very proud of that, but we also have an Imperialistic side that is not disclosed inside the US.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael Racine, WI, USA 07-26-05
    Michael Racine, WI, USA 07-26-05 Member Since 2005
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    "A Textbook History"

    Not an American textbook, however. Instead, this enlightening and disturbing book relates a history of the world since World War II that demonstrates how the United States has become a new kind of Empire. This Empire is based not on military might -- although as we see in Iraq, this is always an option -- but on the power of giant U.S. engineering, construction and oil corporations to induce nations around the world to borrow heavily from entities like the World Bank and USAID for economic development. Once these nations join the list of debtor nations, these staggering debts are used to get them to accede to a variety of U.S. political and corporate interests.

    "Confessions" is John Perkins' personal account of how, as an "Economic Hitman" or EHM, he and others like him spearheaded this new kind of imperialism. The corporations EHM's worked for are almost quasi-governmental and have supplied our government with officials like Dick Cheney (Halliburton), George Schultz and Caspar Weinberger (Bechtel) and Geoge H.W. Bush who started in oil, became a Congressman, U.N. Ambassador, CIA Director, Vice President, President and is now associated with the highly-influential Carlyle Group.

    But it is the close association of all these people, agencies and corporations with events of history that is so striking. It was the corporatocracy that wanted the legally elected democratic leaders in Guatemala, Iraq, Chile, Panama and Equador assassinated. Their sins? They wanted the profits from the oil, minerals and produce from their countries to help advance the standard of living of their own people. The corporatocracy felt otherwise, as maximum profits are its only raison d'etre.

    But it is the story of the corporatocracy's relationship with Saudi Arabia and the House of Saud and that is most revealing. World events will not be seen in the same light after reading this book.

    This isn't an American textbook, but should be required reading for all Americans.

    20 of 22 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Suzanne Austin, TX, USA 05-12-09
    Suzanne Austin, TX, USA 05-12-09
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    "A useful book"

    I don't know whether or not this book is "true" in an autobiographical sense. I don't care. I also don't care that the EHM in question is often arrogant and annoying. What's important is that the economic techniques detailed and their results *are* going on in the world. This book is a good narrative for pulling together a bunch of information that is neither new nor secret so that more people can understand what's going on and how it affects them. As when banks and payday loan companies realize that they (or at least their top executives) can make more money when customers default on loans. And when people in other countries get pissed off at us because our corporations have made their lives more difficult.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    D. EDWARDS Johannesburg, South Africa 06-15-07
    D. EDWARDS Johannesburg, South Africa 06-15-07 Member Since 2005

    Donn Edwards

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Essential Listening"

    John C Dvorak recommended this book on the TWiT podcast, and I can see why. If you follow current events around the world, this book will fascinate you. If you work for a large company, this book will horrify you. But face the facts, and learn from another man's story.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Bradley Danville, IN, USA 02-27-09
    Bradley Danville, IN, USA 02-27-09
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    "Amazing story if you're not narrow-minded"

    After reading some of these reviews and listening to the book, it appears to me these 1 star reviewers are the ones who are "arrogant". I admit that Perkins does come off with a bit of an ego. I try to look past such flaws in people and focus on the actual content. I have seen many documentaries based on the corporate exploitation of the Third World. I by no means claim to be an expert on the subject, but I like to keep an open mind. To sit back and dismiss Perkins as "delusional" without knowing anything about the situation at hand, to me, is extremely arrogant. If you think that stories like this are false, then I challenge you to visit these countries and find out for yourself.

    There is something quite wrong with this world and I think a lot of people can feel it. This story is just the tip of the iceberg. This book highlights the fact that so many wrongs are done in this world, and just as Perkins did, those that commit wrongdoing justify it to themselves as doing good. I just hope that enough open-minded people read this book and open their eyes to the injustices. If you do enjoy this book then I highly recommend the documentaries "Life and Debt" and "Zeitgeist: Addendum".

    18 of 21 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Greg 110 Homefield Square, Courtice, Ontario 06-04-09
    Greg 110 Homefield Square, Courtice, Ontario 06-04-09 Member Since 2008
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    "As seen in the world"

    Unfortunately, I believe all of the facts in the book to be true. As for those who want to doubt it, look around the world. Talk to people outside of the US and hear what is being said and felt. As for the audiobook part, the narration (as most are) is dry.
    Overall, enjoyed it.

    8 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Keith Porter Pasadena, CA United States 02-07-08
    Keith Porter Pasadena, CA United States 02-07-08 Member Since 2007
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    "Enlightening insider view of economic empire"

    A disturbing and enlightening first-person account of the principles and strategies of American corporatocracy from 1971-2004. The book is a tonic to cut misleading election-year rhetoric about American principles of democracy and contributions to peace and international prosperity. The book sheds new light on conflicts in Panama, Ecuador, Iraq, Iran, and elsewhere, and on the nature of the traffic through the revolving door between the US administration and corporate board rooms. An excellent complement to Tim Weiner's Legacy of Ashes.

    8 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dale Cape TownSouth Africa 10-23-08
    Dale Cape TownSouth Africa 10-23-08
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Fire revealed!"

    This compelling personal account confirms various truths for me about what really goes on in the world today. It's like that common saying - "Where's there smoke, there's fire" and I've been seeing a lot of smoke recently and known there's been fire...well this book shows you size and color of that fire!! Awesome book! Well worth it!

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-10 of 114 results PREVIOUS1212NEXT
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  • Jason
    CAPE TOWNQ, South Africa
    4/18/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "FANTASTIC!!!!!"
    Would you listen to Confessions of an Economic Hitman again? Why?

    I'll probably listen to it again, although I got most of it on the first pass.


    What did you like best about this story?

    It is a tale well told. The writing style is polished and experienced - you can tell this is far from Perkin's first book. It is seldom that I have to draaaaaag myself away from a book, but this one was like that - I found myself stealing minutes to carry on listening. Well explained, never too technical to follow, but also never dull. It really is more like the type of thing we expect from the Graham Green he recounts meeting in the book than a non-fiction tale. It reads like a spy drama, but this mia-culpa is very much an act of confession, a catharsis of some sort.


    What about Brian Emerson’s performance did you like?

    I enjoyed his style, the moments of real urgency he brought into the telling. I enjoyed his tempo and tone. He did an excellent job.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    None leap to mind - it was all so very compelling.


    Any additional comments?

    If I was to offer one item of critique, if Perkins was to ever revised this work, I would be very interested to see a slightly wider take on the effects of EHM's on the third world. He takes it all onto his own shoulders, and it is clear makes absolutely NO attempt to share the blame around. Whilst this is humbling and admirable, it is maybe a one-dimensional take on a very complex social interaction. Thomas Malthus' Essay on the Principles of Population would draw a trajectory line on the distribution of finite resources within a society being spread more thinly as the population expands but resources do not. Whilst the EHM's were offering a panacea for that very situation, and promising massive wealth for all yet not delivering on that, would a hypothetical control society not have also become more impoverished without the interventions detailed in the book? It's not to let the EHM off the hook, but to maybe explore that nexus of different vectors happening on a society. Perkins may (with good reason) contend that this would be beyond the scope of the book, and muddy its beautiful clarity, but in some ways the failure to even touch on these considerations is, to my mind at least, an oversight.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Kevin
    OMAGH, United Kingdom
    11/24/12
    Overall
    "Prepare to be gobsmacked!"

    You really owe it to yourself to listen to it. My jaw just dropped - I thought that things in the world of power were manipulated, but this is truly staggering.



    The book is well paced and has the ring of truth about it. Narration is poor, but once you shake that off it shouldn't matter.



    Drops off a bit at the end, but a great listen.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Fred
    London, United Kingdom
    9/18/12
    Overall
    "Awful!"

    Half truths and simplistic drivel of the worst kind. Makes me wish I could get a "refund" of the time I wasted listening to it. Avoid!

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Wlodzimierz
    LondonUnited Kingdom
    7/11/07
    Overall
    "This book gives hope for a better future"

    Where Hegemony and Survival by Noam Chomsky scratches the surface of the problem, Confessions of an Economic Hitman opens the lid and shows the truth in depth. It is the book that Hugo Chavez should have waved from the UN tribune. It is truly amazing to discover that the people that realise what is really happenning or want to know what is really happenning are so many. The high position of this book on Audible bestsellers is both deserved and encouraging. The arguments against Noam Chomsky are known and he is easily discredited in a PR campaigns as 'leftist'.
    Now, what are they going to say to John Perkins?
    'The missile is not invented...'

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • A. Johnson
    New York, NY
    7/3/07
    Overall
    "Amateurish, and poorly narrated."

    John Perkins appears to be a paranoid schizophrenic with delusions of grandeur. The conspiracy of which he writes is backed up by one conversation with a character that is presumably there only as a plot device, and no evidence beyond what he just 'knows'. What worries me more is that, like any good lie, much of this book is true, and so people may actually believe it. The CIA did bad things. Large (often, but not exclusively) American conglomerates also did bad things. Organisations may have had ulterior motives, and they also wanted to profit. But that's it, and it is very well documented. That may be unlovely, but it is not a conspiracy. Only at the beginning of the last quarter of the book is the cold war (against which much of this activity was taking place, rightly or wrongly) even explicitly mentioned, and summarily dismissed. And Mr. Perkins anti-globalisation worldview and his change to environmentalism (conveniently after his millions were made) assumes that the poor around the world would much rather be living happy stone age existences than be burdened with medicine, progress, jobs, and opportunity. What patronising nonsense. It isn't even written well. A last word on the narration: Brian Emerson is execrable. He has a cadence which makes you wonder if he isn't just a particularly sophisticated computer voice as the emphasis is frequently wrong and it is all reminiscent of a liturgical chant. His pronunciation of non-English words belies the author's stated linguistic abilities and interest in travel. All told, my first (and hopefully only) one star review. Avoid.

    8 of 16 people found this review helpful
  • David
    LondonUnited Kingdom
    7/7/08
    Overall
    "What a world we live in"

    Everybody should know this. It should change your life and certainly open your eyes.

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Hjalti
    Kopavogur, Iceland
    4/18/12
    Overall
    "It's okay..."

    The it's an interesting book. The thing that bugs me about it is how it seems that John Perkins is excusing himself with this book, like he didn't know what he was doing but now he does.

    The most fun part of the book is when he describes his travels across countries like Panama, Iran, Indonesia and such, then you really listen.

    If you want a good book on this subject, try The Shock Doctrine. I recommend it over Confessions of an Economic Hitman

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Richard
    NorthamptonUnited Kingdom
    12/6/10
    Overall
    "See world events differently"

    I downloaded this book on the recommendation of a tech podcast I listen to called This Week In Tech (sponsored by Audible). I really enjoyed it. You'll question what you hear on the news and what certain countries say in the future and find quite alarming and resonating parallels with some of the events in this book. It's worth it, just to question history.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
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