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A Primate's Memoir: A Neuroscientist’s Unconventional Life Among the Baboons | [Robert M. Sapolsky]

A Primate's Memoir: A Neuroscientist’s Unconventional Life Among the Baboons

"I had never planned to become a savanna baboon when I grew up; instead, I had always assumed I would become a mountain gorilla," writes Robert Sapolsky in this witty and riveting chronicle of a scientist's coming-of-age in remote Africa. An exhilarating account of Sapolsky's twenty-one-year study of a troop of rambunctious baboons in Kenya, A Primate's Memoir interweaves serious scientific observations with wry commentary about the challenges and pleasures of living in the wilds of the Serengeti-for man and beast alike.
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Publisher's Summary

"I had never planned to become a savanna baboon when I grew up; instead, I had always assumed I would become a mountain gorilla," writes Robert Sapolsky in this witty and riveting chronicle of a scientist's coming-of-age in remote Africa. An exhilarating account of Sapolsky's twenty-one-year study of a troop of rambunctious baboons in Kenya, A Primate's Memoir interweaves serious scientific observations with wry commentary about the challenges and pleasures of living in the wilds of the Serengeti-for man and beast alike.

Over two decades, Sapolsky survives culinary atrocities, gunpoint encounters, and a surreal kidnapping, while witnessing the encroachment of the tourist mentality on the farthest vestiges of unspoiled Africa. As he conducts unprecedented physiological research on wild primates, he becomes ever more enamored of his subjects - unique and compelling characters in their own right - and he returns to them summer after summer, until tragedy finally prevents him. By turns hilarious and poignant, A Primate's Memoir is a magnum opus from one of our foremost science writers.

©2001 Robert M. Sapolsky (P)2013 Tantor

What the Critics Say

"Filled with cynicism and awe, passion and humor, this memoir is both an absorbing account of a young man's growing maturity and a tribute to the continent that, despite its troubles and extremes, held him in its thrall." (Publishers Weekly, Starred Review)

"Mike Chamberlain narrates this work by primatologist Robert M. Sapolsky, who went to Kenya to study baboons. Chamberlain's lively, bemused tone communicates Sapolsky's down-to-earth approach and sense of humor. Sapolsky's writing is eminently approachable for the layperson, and the listener soon begins to feel acquainted with the various baboons in the troop and to see certain similarities between their behavior and those of the human world. Through the amusing moments and the trials and tribulations, Chamberlain's energetic narration provides a great complement to the author's quirky personality." (AudioFile)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.4 (176 )
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4.4 (155 )
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  •  
    Jan New Westminster, BC, Canada 07-06-15
    Jan New Westminster, BC, Canada 07-06-15 Member Since 2011
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    "One of the best books I've ever read."

    I admit I went in biased having watched all his youtube lectures and read his other books, but this book was so satisfying as a narrative and so beautifully written, I'm having trouble recalling when I've ever enjoyed a book so much. "To Kill a Mockingbird" comes to mind as a perfect piece of literature. This book is so close, I'll probably think of it as my second all time favourite from now on. The only thing that would have made it better for me would be to have it read by Sapolsky. But the narration was good anyway.

    44 of 46 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Robin A. Gower Point Pleasant, NJ USA 03-05-15
    Robin A. Gower Point Pleasant, NJ USA 03-05-15 Member Since 2011

    Robin

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    "Compelling, humane, intelligent"

    This book, part memoir, part science, part philosophy, touched me deeply and taught me much about the tragicomedy of primate lives.

    35 of 38 people found this review helpful
  •  
    HALE HATICE KIZILCIK 08-17-15 Member Since 2014

    I am addicted to reading and listening to books just opened a new page in my life.

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    "Hilarious, informative, touching"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes and I already did. Although the book is supposedly about baboons, it makes one question a number of philosophical questions like evil and good, free will, meaning/meaninglessness of life. It also raises issues about world politics...


    What did you like best about this story?

    The narration and characterization of the baboons is so powerful. At the end of the book, I wanted to desert humans and start a new life with the baboons.


    Which character – as performed by Mike Chamberlain – was your favorite?

    Benjamin... He is a hero...


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    It made me laugh and cry


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dubito Ergo Sum Vancouver BC 08-12-15
    Dubito Ergo Sum Vancouver BC 08-12-15 Member Since 2014

    Super skeptic, reality poet, mega geek, & science nerd extraordinaire.

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    "Sapolsky is eclectic and enthralling!"
    Where does A Primate's Memoir rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    As far as memoirs go, probably the best (and considering he was collecting scientific data the whole time, probably the most accurate too).


    What was one of the most memorable moments of A Primate's Memoir?

    Sapolsky's recollection of the story of Dian Fossey, her life, her controversy, her murder, and his fascination with her & her gorillas. He recalls a rather harrowing hike to where she researched, and her burial site in Rwanda.His stories of stalking his baboons with a blowgun loaded with sedative darts were very entertaining.


    What didn’t you like about Mike Chamberlain’s performance?

    He's a good narrator, and his other readings I've enjoyed, but in this book he failed to grasp Sapolsky's style of prose and humor. To anyone that has spent time listening to him lecture, Chamberlain looses a lot of depth in translation. For instance when reading some passages clearly intended to be humorous (because he's also told these jokes during class lectures at Stanford), Chamberlain reads them in a more flattened tone, failing to communicate much of Sapolsky's wit and style.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

    "A Tragic Baboon Epic"


    Any additional comments?

    Beware of beef at tourist lodges in Africa.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Linda Longview, TX, United States 08-13-15
    Linda Longview, TX, United States 08-13-15 Member Since 2012
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    "A Personal Memoir of the life of a researcher"

    I had heard lectures by Robert Sapolsky on the internet and was expecting this to be a more in depth science discussion along with some personal experiences.

    It turned out to be a memoir of his personal experiences in Africa. His experiences are of two cultures - one human and one Baboon.

    At first I was a little disappointed in that there was little scientific discussion of his research. Secondly I didn't like the reader and the writing was odd to say the least. To give credit to the reader, he did the best he could with the strange writing.

    None the less, the memoir is authentic and heartfelt. I would not have missed it. Well worth struggling through with the strange delivery.

    The power of the message is such that it is hard to rate the book. It probably deserves better than 3 stars but I can't go higher with such strange writing. I will say that the writing is not what is typically encountered as "poor" and "amateurish". The writing is just odd, mixing references to current events, cultural phenomena, Baboon interaction described as animal behavior but lapsing often into human behavior, etc. I wonder if a younger reader (I am retired) could even follow it. The book needs one of those sidebars to explain the odd language and references.

    The book gives lots to ponder and to wonder about. The book is a gift of sorts by Sapolsky to everyone else.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David 08-31-15
    David 08-31-15 Member Since 2015
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    "Brilliant"

    Brilliant memoir - Robert M. Sapolsky is a gifted writer who has a deep understanding of the people of East Africa in addition to the wildlife he studies.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Genevieve Cheesman Adelaide, Aust 08-31-15
    Genevieve Cheesman Adelaide, Aust 08-31-15 Member Since 2013

    Acorn Counselling Services

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    "One of the best"

    Charming, humorous, honest and very interesting. This audio book is one of the best that I have listened to. Thank you, both author and reader for a wonderful experience, which I shall reflect upon for some time. Namaste.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    M. Robinson Mount Holly, NJ, US 08-29-15
    M. Robinson Mount Holly, NJ, US 08-29-15 Member Since 2013

    myvallie

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    "It did keep my interest"

    This book is actually about the author experiencing the people and culture of a few African regions AND his field work studying baboons. It's a well written story and well told. The story is biased and opinionated in a few places but, it is his story. The author's luxury of privilege while weaving through these cultures unfolds predictably over the years. With this said, I enjoyed the audiobook.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    N. Hawryluk 08-29-15
    N. Hawryluk 08-29-15 Member Since 2015

    SpikeDelight

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    "Fascinating"

    Surprisingly affecting account of a scientist studying baboons in Kenya, and his interactions with the local villagers. Excellent narrator. [AUDIBLE]

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    CHET YARBROUGH LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 08-28-15
    CHET YARBROUGH LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 08-28-15 Member Since 2015

    Faced with mindless duty, when an audio book player slips into a rear pocket and mini buds pop into ears, old is made new again.

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    "GUIDE TO AFRICA"

    Robert Sapolsky’s “A Primates Memoir” is a masochist’s guide to Africa. It is what you expect from a biological anthropologist who sojourns to Africa in the late 1970s. Sapolsky lives in a tent while studying baboons. At the age of 12, Sapolsky appears to know what he wants from life. In his middle-school years, he begins studying Swahili, the primary language of Southeast Africa. He wants an understanding of life.

    Sapolsky’s Ph. D. thesis, written in 1984, is “The neuroendocrinology of stress and aging”. Presumably, his trip to Africa became the basis for his academic thesis. Sapolsky’s experience in Africa is recounted in “A Primate’s Memoir”.

    The overlay of Sapolsky’s memoir is the reported evolution of a baboon family in Southeast Africa. He shows that baboon families, like all families, are born, mature, and die within a framework of psychological and physical challenges imbued by culture. All lives face challenge but culture can ameliorate or magnify the intensity and consequence of the challenge.

    Sapolsky gives the example of Kenyan “crazy” people who are hospitalized, treated, and fed to deal with their mental imbalance. In America, it seems “crazy” people are left to the street. The inference is that Kenyan “crazy” people live a less stressful life than American “crazy” people. This is a positive view of Kenyan culture but there are ample negative views in Sapolsky’s memoir. Rampant poverty, malnutrition, bureaucratic corruption, and abysmal medical treatment are Sapolsky’s recollected examples.

    Sapolsky’s memoir shows he clearly lives an unconventional life, but it seems a life of purpose. What more is there?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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  • Helen
    London
    3/12/14
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    "A life changing book which may be uncomfortable"

    The hard copy of this is one of my desert island books. If you read it, human behaviour will never seem inexplicable again.

    So, I had to listen to the audiobook. The content was just as impressive as the hard copy, but a rather different experience. To begin with I was not sure about the narration. The narrator used a distinctive American accent which, not being American, I could not identify. I have listened to talks online by Sapolsky and am not sure the accent is the same as his. Anyway, after a while, I got used to it. I think there were a few false emphases but nothing to worry about.

    The style of delivery was unemotional but appropriate to the whole thrust of the book - while acknowledging human emotion and culture, including Sapolsky's own, it distances them by means of the scientific method, and describes baboon behaviour in the same way.

    It is impossible not to be moved by parts of this book, especially the tragic final section.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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