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karen

United States | Member Since 2004

1013
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 148 reviews
  • 176 ratings
  • 0 titles in library
  • 123 purchased in 2014
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202

  • Executive Privilege

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 49 mins)
    • By Phillip Margolin
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis
    Overall
    (652)
    Performance
    (280)
    Story
    (285)

    When private detective Dana Cutler is hired by an attorney with powerful political connections, the assignment seems simple enough: follow a pretty college student named Charlotte Walsh and report on where she goes and whom she sees. But then the unexpected happens.

    Lu says: "Entertaining"
    "Only one part is fiction.."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Normally I stay away from legal thrillers, and those that involve politics? Never. But I saw this book listed, and remembered that many years ago, I'd gone to a book signing by Phillip Margolin in Palo Alto. Funny things is, I still remember many of the things Margolin said that night -- it was one of the best author signings I've ever been to.

    Unlike many authors who seem to have their main objective as getting done with this event and getting out of there, Margolin seemed to enjoy chatting with readers. Much more than most authors, he talked about himself, offering personal details, how several of his books came to be, how he worked, and more. Then someone asked him what his favorite book was, and noting that he -- like most of us -- had many favorites, he named "Stone City" by Mitchell Smith. I walked out of that bookstore that night not only with several of Margolin's books, but also 'Stone City', which is indeed a very good book.

    I'm not sure why, but at some point I didn't keep up with Margolin's books, but now, seeing the Audible edition of 'Executive Privilege'. it was time to jump back in. Glad I did. I listened to this book in just two days -- I should have quit on that second day, done something else, but decided to keep doing household tasks so I could keep listening. There was never a good time to quit.

    Anybody who reads these kinds of thrillers knows how it's going to end -- the bad guys (or girls) are caught, the little-guy (or girl) lawyer comes out on top, the perpetrators of evil get their just deserts, and the world is a better place. The interesting factor in this book is that you really don't know who the bad guy is -- or at least, I didn't see it coming until it was right in front of me. Today, with an abundance of sleazy politicians, ruthless aides, big money law firms and other corrupt denizens of the DC ruling class, sexual shenanigans abound -- together with the need to cover it all up. The story rings true on many counts.

    The only fiction is that the bad guys got caught. In today's world, I think we're seeing that they almost always get away with it.

    Anyway, great book. Thoroughly enjoyable, flawless narrator, just great entertainment.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Redemption Key

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By S. G. Redling
    • Narrated By Tanya Eby
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (18)
    Performance
    (14)
    Story
    (14)

    Her narrow escape from blue-eyed assassin Tom Booker has made former data analyst Dani Britton question all of her choices-like trusting "good guys" who carry badges. On the run and haunted by the government-sanctioned massacre of her coworkers, Dani finally settles in remote Redemption Key, Florida, at a bar where strong drinks and shady deals are the norm.

    karen says: "Odd little book"
    "Odd little book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A "Daily Deal", knew nothing about the author or the book before listening.... which was probably my mistake. There are a series of books by this author, and I don't know where this one fits in, but it was obvious there was a lot of back-story about these much-wounded, bodies-covered-with-scars characters. The past was alluded to, but I never got over the feeling that I'd walked into the middle of a play.

    It was well read and parts were interesting -- I could see the attraction -- but when I was an hour from the end, and had just listened to yet another set of paragraphs enthusing over Dani's body parts, most frequently extolling her exquisite legs, her "thin little arms" and her "tiny little feet", I decided I'd had enough. There's more to writing a "thriller" than endless descriptions of her body -- and everyone else's, come to think of it. Much ink was spend on defining, over and over again, everyone's body type, very very big, little teeny tiny, and in between. Seemed very strange.

    So I never did really get into it -- it had great potential. I liked the location. But way too thin a story line to be compelling, and the characters never emerged from two-dimensional.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Night Music

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 49 mins)
    • By Jojo Moyes
    • Narrated By Clare Corbett
    Overall
    (300)
    Performance
    (272)
    Story
    (266)

    The Spanish House is a mixture of designs, Georgian, Gothic and Moorish, as if whoever started it had simply got bored. It has long been known as an architectural folly to locals, and is now nearly derelict to boot. When its reclusive owner dies intestate, the Spanish House is left to his city-dwelling niece. For Isabel, recently widowed, the house is a potential lifeline - the only hope she has of providing for her two children without having to sell her most treasured possession.

    Kelly says: "Jojo Moyes is my favorite."
    "Extremely valuable book!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It was thanks to this book that I got all the windows in the house washed -- inside and out -- the garage floor swept and both the linen closet and the sewing room reorganized. I couldn't stop listening -- I had to find some way to justify taking the time to keep listening.

    This was my first exposure to Jojo Moyes -- never heard of her before, never come across any of her books before this one, when I rolled the dice on yet another really great Daily Deal. "Night Music" won't be the last -- except that I expect I'll listen to this one a few more times before I'm finished with it.

    It's funny, I see other reviewers saying that this isn't Moyes best book, which just blows my mind. Can't quite see how any of them could be better than this, but... hey, I'm willing to try.

    Maybe it's just me, but there's something about a battle over a house that attracts me. Another of my favorite books (not the film) is Andre Dubus III's "House of Sand and Fog" which also involves a house everyone wants, and the emotional pull such an embattled dwelling can bring about. "Night Music" is very different from that book -- maybe even better -- but I felt the same compulsion to keep listening until it all got worked out. Of course "Night Music" is really about the people -- the fragile, wounded, too-trusting professional violinist who inherits it, the corrupt builder who pretends to help restore it, but has evil plans of his own, the children caught in the middle of it, the guy who's camping out, unknown, in the boiler room... and the rabbits. Can't forget the rabbits.

    What can I say? Don't miss this one. Your own house will be a whole lot cleaner by the time you finish!

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • He Who Dies Last: Dr. Hoffmann, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Christoph Spielberg
    • Narrated By Michael Page
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (12)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (9)

    Doctor Felix Hoffmann is furious when an infusion pump mysteriously fails, nearly killing his 82-year-old patient. But his anger quickly turns to suspicion when he learns the patient’s posh apartment is for sale - without the patient’s knowledge. Together with his vivacious girlfriend, Celine, Felix discovers that someone at the hospital has concocted a deadly scheme to fleece geriatric patients and then hasten their deaths. Turns out he didn’t save his patient from an equipment failure - he saved him from murder.

    karen says: "Outstanding!"
    "Outstanding!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A low-key mystery set in Berlin -- and a great listen by any standard. There's murder afoot here -- but Dr, Felix Hoffman works with geriatric patients, and some of the normal end-of-life situations he encounters might be natural, others clearly not so. But this is not a "thriller", rather a really interesting look into the world of seriously ill old people and one doctor who serves them.

    And their pets. The following is not really a "spoiler", but... "Trixie", described as an 'ugly mutt' was owned by Dr. Hoffman's elderly aunt, so when the aunt herself dies, Trixie is adopted by Dr. Hoffman and figures prominently in the tale. What's interesting -- as a side note in the story -- is that Dr, Hoffman recognizes the important part that pets play in the lives of the elderly, and so he uses a legacy to create an adjunct to their hospital, a kennel for patient's pets, where the patients can go to visit any time they're able -- they even installed a few hospital beds, so a patient can even spend the night with their pet if they wish. Not surprisingly for us pet lovers, but Dr. Hoffman notes that after this facility is established, the demand for pain medication and anti-depressants in his ward drops by half. I believe that -- and an interesting idea. I wonder if this really exists in Germany.

    All in all, this a really good book. I'd never heard of the book or the author before -- thank you Daily Deal! -- but now I'll definitely seek out more "Dr. Hoffman" books on Audible. Very enjoyable -- I was sad to finish it.



    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Bonfire of the Vanities

    • UNABRIDGED (27 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Tom Wolfe
    • Narrated By Joe Barrett
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (999)
    Performance
    (559)
    Story
    (561)

    Tom Wolfe's best-selling modern classic tells the story of Sherman McCoy, an elite Wall Street bond trader who has it all: wealth, power, prestige, a Park Avenue apartment, a beautiful wife, and an even more beautiful mistress - until one wrong turn sends Sherman spiraling downward into a humiliating fall from grace. A car accident in the Bronx involving Sherman, his girlfriend, and two young lower-class black men sets a match to the incendiary racial and social tensions of 1980s New York City.

    JOHN says: "TEN STARS"
    "Big mistake"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Three hours in, and I began to realize what a colossal mistake I've been making with audiobooks. I've been giving five stars to lots of books, books I really enjoyed, books that kept me listening way beyond time to quit, well-narrated books, all of them the kind of thing I knew I'd remember for a long time. All those were good books, great books, maybe. But now, what do I do with this book? "Bonfire of the Vanities"? This book -- as written and narrated -- is so far beyond all those other books I've loved, what do I do now? Only five stars are available!

    The other thing is, I could easily write a book setting forth all the reasons why this is the best audiobook I've ever listened to -- well, on a par with my other all-time favorite, "Angela's Ashes", which - up until now -- I'd decided was the only other PERFECT audiobook I'd come across. Now there are two.

    I won't write a book about it, I won't even say much more, except for one thing: if you've read this far, and decide NOT to buy this book, you're a damn fool. This is the experience of a lifetime, an experience that will draw you in, wrap you up, and then spit you out 27 hours later, exhausted, limp with emotion, and knowing only one thing: you've got to listen to it again.

    And as to Joe Barrett, the narrator, there should be a lifetime uber-superior award for his interpretation of this book -- he handled everything with perfection, the gazillions of New York accents, of every possible ethnicity, he slam-dunked the various complicated medical terms, not even Yiddish threw him off his stride. This book is worth it for the narration alone.

    Buy it. Download, and click it on. You're gonna be missing the experience of a lifetime if you don't.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • After I'm Gone: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Laura Lippman
    • Narrated By Linda Emond
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (306)
    Performance
    (270)
    Story
    (275)

    Dead is dead. Missing is gone. When Felix Brewer meets nineteen-year-old Bernadette "Bambi" Gottschalk at a Valentine's Day dance in 1959, he charms her with wild promises, some of which he actually keeps. Thanks to his lucrative - if not all legal - businesses, she and their three little girls live in luxury. But on the Fourth of July in 1976, Bambi's comfortable world implodes when Felix, facing prison, vanishes. Though Bambi has no idea where her husband - or his money - might be, she suspects one woman does: his devoted young mistress, Julie.

    C. Vincent says: "Cannot rate this highly enough!"
    "Very disappointing"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Too bad, too. Having read almost all the Tess Monaghan books and at least a couple of the stand-alones, I was greatly looking forward to this one. Laura Lippman is a fine writer, by any standard. But not this time. I didn't connect with this one at all.

    It doesn't really fit into any genre -- it's not really a mystery, or if it is, it's so slow moving and tedious that if that's what you wanted, you'd give up early. (I nearly did, many different times.) It could be chic lit of some kind, what with all the women and their inner monologues, fighting over what this criminal they loved had left them as he fled -- "the women" including a wife, mistresses, various female children, various extended family. It could be just a straight novel, maybe, but it's just not good enough. The 'who cares?' factor is way too high. In fact, if anyone other than an established author like Lippman had written this, it would never have sold.

    All the way through, I was wondering if the narration was a part of the problem. Narrator Linda Emond has a very pleasant, easy to listen to voice, but as the story jumps back and forth in time, with several different women talking about what they were thinking, what they did, what they wore, what others had done to them, what they should have done, etc etc it was extremely difficult to keep track of who was talking, and where in time they were. Emond didn't make any serious attempt at differentiating the voices, nor did she sometimes even pause, when leaping from an historical accounting into the present or back again. In fact, I started/restarted this book three different times -- never would have done that, if it had been anyone but Lippman -- but in the early pages, I couldn't figure out who was talking, when it was taking place, or who was talking next. Not to mention that it was boring, right off the block. I couldn't find a way to care.

    Toward the end, I found myself wondering if this was a fleshed-out true Baltimore story of some kind -- a criminal, flush with assets, runs off to parts unknown, forever, thus avoiding conviction, while the women he leaves behind fight over his left-behind spoils. The "cold case" investigation never seems to be a real part of the story -- just something shuffled in, here and there, so it could sort-of qualify as detective fiction.

    Best advice? Skip this one. Virtually any other book by Miss Lippman will be better. Oh, and another piece of advice? If you're going to name your protagonist "Bambi", you darn well better be writing a literary masterpiece, because we all harbor too many cutesy associations with that name to tolerate anything short of genius.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Mother's Day Out: The Margie Peterson Mysteries, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Karen MacInerney
    • Narrated By Cris Dukehart
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (103)
    Performance
    (93)
    Story
    (96)

    With a husband who works long hours trying to make partner and two rambunctious kids that are running her ragged, Margie Peterson is like any other worn-out suburban mom. When she decides to take a job as a PI for a seedy local detective agency, everything changes. It doesn’t take long for Margie to get in over her head: Her first day on the job she totals her minivan, mistakenly enters a drag contest, and winds up in the bathroom with a dead transvestite. But when Margie finds her home number in the victim’s phone, things really start to get interesting.

    karen says: "That was fun!"
    "That was fun!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Yet another bargain book success! Never heard of either the book or the author, but decided to roll the dice and take a chance -- and once again, that was a good idea.

    It's funny, they say there are only four basic plots in all of fiction, but I'm not sure how that accounts for this one. As the story evolves, a pretty unique situation reveals itself -- although in today's crazy world I suppose it isn't quite as unique as I think it is. Even so, this was like nothing I'd ever read before. I loved the freshness of the whole thing.

    Karen MacInerny has created interesting, likable characters and structured a truly unique plot but what makes this book a real delight is how funny it is. One of the side-stories deals with how Margie, formerly a stay at home mother, now a new, untrained, part-time private eye, is forced to deal with the head of her daughter's day care center. My kids are grown now, but it seems to me I had some of those same inane discussions with a similar Witch in Power when they were little -- you know, the "Solve (this issue with your child) by tomorrow, or we're expelling her." No, my daughter hadn't decided that she was a dog -- with all that entails, including eating on the floor, barking, biting, etc -- but I seem to recall similar disputes and similar chaos. And I also recall spending some evenings with one kid or the other, explaining just how important to Life As We Know it, that they amend their conduct by tomorrow morning, or all hell was going to break loose. Like Margie, I simply could not deal with having to find new child care arrangements. I'm sure most other working mothers will have had similar experiences. Odd how much more fun it is to remember those situations than was dealing with them in the first place!

    Also odd was that so many readers compared this book to those of Janet Evanovitch. I don't get that at all. I've read/tried to read a couple of Evanovitch's books, and didn't enjoy them at all -- I've stopped even looking at her series. To me, the Evanovitch books came across as downright silly, whereas this one was genuinely funny. All in the eyes of the beholder, I suppose.

    So? All in all, a good book and a great narrator. I'll be looking for more.



    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Little Mercies

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Heather Gudenkauf
    • Narrated By Kate Rudd, Tanya Eby
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (199)
    Performance
    (181)
    Story
    (182)

    Veteran social worker Ellen Moore has seen the worst side of humanity - the vilest acts one person can commit against another. She is a fiercely dedicated children's advocate and a devoted mother and wife. But one blistering summer day, a simple moment of distraction will have repercussions that Ellen could never have imagined.

    Carla says: "Couldn't stop listening!"
    "Whoa! Ten stars, if that's possible."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I listened to "The Weight of Silence", also by -- then unknown to me -- author Heather Gudenkauf and generally liked it -- I liked it well enough to try another. Who knew that this second book would ultimately rank among my all-time favorites? All through the whole book, I kept making mental lists of everyone I had to pester, to get them to read/listen to 'Little Mercies'. It's a stunner, by any standard. Wish I had someone to discuss it with.

    There's a dual plot: in one segment, Ellen Moore is a first-class social worker, the kind of passionate, caring, dedicated social worker we wish all of them were. But by a freaky communication error with her husband on a hot and hectic morning, Ellen doesn't realize that her husband has already put baby Avery in Ellen's car. Ellen rushes off to a client emergency, not knowing her one-year-old is in the back seat. Not until she returns to her car hours later and finds people breaking the windows to free her unconscious child does she realize what happened.

    In a parallel story, a gutsy little ten year old Jenny Baird finds herself alone on a bus, heading to a strange town, after her ne'er-do-well father gets himself into a fight and arrested as he's just about to board. it's a heartbreaking tale, as this little girl tries to seek out first her grandmother, whom she's never met, and then her mother, who's never cared two bits about her, and finds herself lost and alone, each time - except, that is, for the 'little mercies' of total strangers who lovingly take her in and try to help.....

    In a way, 'Little Mercies' reminds me of the best of Jodi Picault's books. With the two parallel stories, each told by an excellent narrator, you experience two compelling tales as they intertwine. in Jenny's story, we wish we all had the kindness of some of the people Jenny meets. And in Ellen's story, virtually all of us who are mothers won't have too much trouble seeing this terrible chain of events as happening to any one of us. One of my friends -- mother of seven children herself -- is adamant that any parent who "forgets" his/her child in a locked car should simply be taken out and shot, no further questions asked. No caring parent, she contends, could ever be so mindless. This friend is at the top of my list to get her to read this book. It CAN happen. Innocently, and in spite of every safeguard -- well almost every safeguard -- it does happen. And what follows compounds the tragedy.

    Warning: once you start listening, you'd better clear your schedule. There are times when you simply can't stop listening, you just have to push on. It's that good.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Her Royal Spyness: A Royal Spyness Mystery

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Rhys Bowen
    • Narrated By Katherine Kellgren
    Overall
    (4546)
    Performance
    (3893)
    Story
    (3869)

    Georgie, aka Lady Victoria Georgiana Charlotte Eugenie, cousin of King George V of England, is penniless and trying to survive on her own as an ordinary person in London in 1932. So far she has managed to light a fire and boil an egg... She's gate-crashed a wedding... She's making money by secretly cleaning houses... And she's been asked to spy for Her Majesty the Queen.

    Alice says: "Happy addition to a difficult genre"
    "Delightful!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I've been seeing these books by Rhys Bowen for years, but always avoided them. "Spyness" it says, and espionage isn't one of my favored genres. But then came a Daily Deal, and an affordable way to see what the books were all about, because indeed, most of these books were getting great reviews.

    I loved it! As it turns out, the "spying" involved isn't international cloak and dagger stuff -- more like cape-and-butter knife social affairs, ferreting out juicy bits of gossip for "HRM" -- and in her service, but of course! The "spying" leads to some dangerous situations for several people, some of whom survive, others who don't, but whatever, it's a worthy tale and a pleasure throughout.

    Bowen's characters were uniquely interesting, and there was a very credible mystery at the heart of the plot. Not a simpering heroine in sight, but rather a spunky down-on-her-luck member of the royal family -- somewhat distant, but not THAT distant -- who takes charge in a rather admirable way. Several "real" people were scattered among the fictional ones -- I loved the characterization of Wallace Simpson -- I have no idea if this portrayal is accurate or not, but in Rhys Bowen's hands, she comes off as slightly wacky, irreverent, outrageous and seriously funny. Same with the protagonist, Lady Victoria Georgiana Charlotte Eugenie -- and especially her much-married mother, who's equally flamboyant and not the least bit ashamed of it. Who would imagine that the stiff-upper-lip English gentry could be so funny behind doors?

    Very good book -- unfortunately, most of them are too short for me to spend a credit on, so I'll have to look for more bargains, or find them in print. But I'll definitely be looking.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • The Good Thief's Guide to Amsterdam

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Chris Ewan
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (614)
    Performance
    (544)
    Story
    (549)

    Charlie Howard travels the globe writing suspense novels for a living. To supplement his income - and keep his hand in - Charlie has a small side business: stealing for a very discreet clientele on commission. When a mysterious American offers Charlie 20,000 euros to steal two small monkey figurines to match the one he already has, Charlie is suspicious; the job seems too good to be true, and of course, it is. He soon finds the American beaten nearly to death, while the third figurine has disappeared.

    adrienne says: "A delightful surprise!"
    "For serious whodunit lovers only"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Confession: I love detective fiction, murder mysteries, suspense plots of all kinds, but what I mostly appreciate about them are the characters, the location, occasionally an interesting plot or subplot that deals with something that interests me. In spite of it all, I don't particularly care who "done" it. Occasionally, I will skip the last 20-30 pages of a book entirely -- I'd like to know who actually DID it, but when the explanation of how they did it, or why, gets too long and tiresome, I tune out. I really don't care.

    This is one such book. I thoroughly enjoyed the first 5.5 hours of this book -- I like the main anti-hero character -- okay, he's no George Ripley, but still, as a witty, sophisticated and delightfully droll thief, he was just fine. I liked the Amsterdam location. I thought I was enjoying the plot.

    But then the denouement started, waaaaaaay too early -- and it went on, and on and on and on. Explanation after explanation.... good grief. For a book that's slightly over 7 hours long, if it takes 1.5 hours to explain how it all happened, that's too much. Too complex. I no longer cared -- I wanted to move along to something else.

    I quit listening with 48 minutes left.... way too much explanation for me. Good book, though, up to that point.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Edge of Evil

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By J. A. Jance
    • Narrated By Kristen Kairos
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (65)
    Performance
    (32)
    Story
    (33)

    The end of her high-profile broadcasting career came too soon for TV journalist Alison Reynolds - bounced off the air by executives who wanted a "younger face". With a divorce from her cheating husband of 10 years also pending, there is nothing keeping her in L.A. any longer.

    Heather says: "Edge of Evil"
    "The series gets better. Much better."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Let me say first, I'm a HUGE fan of J. A. Jance. I've read most of the print copies of her gazillion books, and have purchased eight of her audiobooks, mostly the Johanna Brady series. This was my second Ali Reynolds -- which is a good thing: if I had listened to this one first, I never would have bought another.

    First of all, this has to be one of the worst-produced audio books I've ever listened to. At random moments, some peppy, jazzy, supposedly uplifting elevator music interrupts the reading, sometimes drowning out the narrator's voice. It's so inappropriate - what on earth was someone thinking?? It's not chapter divisions, one such interruption was mid-sentence. Totally weird -- and completely destroys whatever mood the book was building toward.

    Then too, much of this book is told in the form of blogs, which might work well on paper, but in an audiobook, not so much. Listening to the narrator's letter-reading voice has a limited appeal - nothing happens, no action or interaction with someone else, just pretty darn dry statements of opinion and articulation of thoughts.

    Finally, a word for authors out there, even really really good ones, like Jance: Perfect people get pretty boring after awhile. It's all well and good to create a laudable character -- not ALL protagonists have to be "flawed". But there has to be a limit. If I wanted to engross myself in completely selfless behavior, I guess I'd opt for Butler's "Lives of the Saints" instead. At least those were real people. Just how perfect is our multi-fired, multi-sued, widowed, about to be divorced nee widowed girl, who always-and-forever puts everyone else on the planet's wishes ahead of her own? One example: a consummately evil man has broken into her home and is beating her to death. In the last possible second, she breaks away, gets her gun, and shoots him to death. Then we have to put up with an agony of soul searching, as Ali beats her breast over what she did to the man's MOTHER -- not anyone she knew, of course, just the woman who had given birth to this monster. "What must she be feeling? I killed her son!" Ali ponders.... well, I don't know what the mother was feeling, assuming she felt anything at all. But I guess if it were me, having marginally survived such a brutal attack, I really don't think fretting about his mother would be at the top of my list of worries -- but then, I'm not a saint. Thank Gd.

    All this is overlaid with Ali's (more understandable) agonizing over the supposed suicide of her best childhood friend. She feels guilty for not having... well, you can imagine. Bottom line: too much agonizing, too much introspection, too many selfless goody-goody acts from a woman who, supposedly, was once a nationally-famous news reporter, who absolutely MUST, at some point, have kicked serious butt to have attained THAT.

    One good thing: we get to find out where Sam the cat comes from, which solves that mystery. As for the rest of it, give this one a pass. The subsequent Ali Reynolds books are pretty good. I guess this was just the practice book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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