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Zachary

Charlottesville, VA, United States

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  • 1 reviews
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  • 23 titles in library
  • 2 purchased in 2014
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  • The Wild Ones: A Sometimes Dismaying, Weirdly Reassuring Story About Looking at People Looking at Animals in America

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Jon Mooallem
    • Narrated By Fred Sanders
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (45)
    Performance
    (39)
    Story
    (40)

    Half of all species could disappear by the end of the century, and scientists now concede that most of America’s endangered animals will survive only if conservationists keep rigging the world around them in their favor. So Jon Mooallem ventures into the field, often taking his daughter with him, to move beyond childlike fascination and make those creatures feel more real. Wild Ones is a tour through our environmental moment and the eccentric cultural history of people and wild animals in America that inflects it.

    Bonny says: "The line between conservation and domestication..."
    "An engrossing story of conservation in America"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The dialogue surrounding conservation in America tends to be presented as a war between ideological camps on the left-right ends of the political spectrum, with left-minded greens insisting that we must do everything at all costs to save any species we can, and conservative climate-change deniers refusing to accept the premise that our world is changing due to the role of modern humans.

    The Wild Ones offers a nuanced view of a complicated issue, delving into the history of environmentalism and conservation in America (and Canada) through a series of case studies. What the author finds is that conservation is all too often a symbolic pursuit caught up in the symbol itself; we are caught wondering how we can engage with these animals in new contexts and still retain a meaning in our interactions with them.

    The book is ultimately interested in how we use animals to tell stories about the world and about ourselves - what does it mean to be wild? The book is funny at times, grave at others, and thought-provoking throughout. In a rapidly changing world, it is important to consider what our role as the human animal can be, and should be.

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