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Wayne

Mountain biking, surfing, skiing, literature, philosophy, psychology, theology and my ipod.

Irvine, CA, United States | Member Since 2009

ratings
125
REVIEWS
36
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
3
HELPFUL VOTES
40

  • Along Came a Spider

    • ABRIDGED (6 hrs)
    • By James Patterson
    • Narrated By Alton Fitzgerald White, Michael Cumpsty
    Overall
    (79)
    Performance
    (36)
    Story
    (36)

    Along Came a Spider first introduced Alex Cross, the brilliant homicide detective. When the daughter of a Hollywood actress and the son of the Secretary of the Treasury are kidnapped, Cross and the Secret Service are pitted against Gary Soneji, a murderous serial kidnapper who wants to commit the crime of the century.

    Lewis Clayton Jr. says: "Great Read"
    "Solid Mystery"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    If you could sum up Along Came a Spider in three words, what would they be?

    A good thriller.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Along Came a Spider?

    Loved how the author turned the good guy into the bad


    Which scene was your favorite?

    Especially liked the ending, keeping open the possibility of continued threat.


    Any additional comments?

    A good listen, must pay attention to keep the characters and events straight. Good suspense until the end.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Sleep Donation: A Novella

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Karen Russell
    • Narrated By Greta Gerwig
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (37)
    Performance
    (36)
    Story
    (36)

    A crisis has swept America. Hundreds of thousands have lost the ability to sleep. Enter the Slumber Corps, an organization that urges healthy dreamers to donate sleep to an insomniac. Under the wealthy and enigmatic Storch brothers the Corps' reach has grown, with outposts in every major US city. Trish Edgewater, whose sister Dori was one of the first victims of the lethal insomnia, has spent the past seven years recruiting for the Corps. But Trish's faith in the organization and in her own motives begins to falter.

    FanB14 says: "Clever Insomnia Epidemic Diary"
    "Engaging future world but banal morality tale"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Really enjoyed the future world of possible viral threat, a little sketchy association of the cause of that threat based on society's lapse into technology, and a very disappointing resolution of this banal morality tale.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Invisible Cities

    • UNABRIDGED (2 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Italo Calvino
    • Narrated By John Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (37)
    Performance
    (34)
    Story
    (35)

    In a garden sit the aged Kublai Khan and the young Marco Polo - Tartar emperor and Venetian traveler. Kublai Khan has sensed the end of his empire coming soon. Marco Polo diverts the emperor with tales of the cities he has seen in his travels around the empire: cities and memory, cities and desire, cities and designs, cities and the dead, cities and the sky, trading cities, hidden cities. Soon it becomes clear that each of these fantastic places is really the same place.

    Melinda says: "Magical Mystery Tour"
    "Falling down the Rabbit Hole"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Having just read Invisible Cities by Calvino today, just about everything is at least swirling in newness of possibilities, like Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, or Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's travels.

    I'm still in the rabbit hole, and don't know what I may have been smoking.

    The story is of tales of cities visited by Marco Polo, as told to Kublai Khan. Sounds simple, but we realize that Marco Polo is the experiential adventurer in the world, while Kublai Khan is the intellectual summarizer of Marco Polo's experiences. Well, even that is up for grabs in the end, as who has the handle on reality--the adventurer or the intllectual?

    At one point, Kublai Khan has reduced everything to nothing more than a chess game, black versus white, but in so doing, he looses all meaning. Then there is Marco Polo who has many adventures to report, but are they real, or just strung together experiences of illusion?

    These philosophical positions are not new, but the experience of them is in the way that I like to be challenged by the new.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • One Hundred Years of Solitude

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Gabriel García Márquez
    • Narrated By John Lee
    Overall
    (397)
    Performance
    (350)
    Story
    (352)

    One of the 20th century's enduring works, One Hundred Years of Solitude is a widely beloved and acclaimed novel known throughout the world and the ultimate achievement in a Nobel Prize-winning career. The novel tells the story of the rise and fall of the mythical town of Macondo through the history of the Buendía family. Rich and brilliant, it is a chronicle of life, death, and the tragicomedy of humankind. In the beautiful, ridiculous, and tawdry story of the Buendía family, one sees all of humanity, just as in the history, myths, growth, and decay of Macondo, one sees all of Latin America.

    Melinda says: "What in the heck happened?????"
    "100 years too much."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Gabriel Marques Garcia was not given the pulitzer prize for "One Hundred Years of Solitude" for an incredilbly good reason. The first half he wrote his heart out as the novelist he is, as he did in Love In the Time of Cholea--a clear novel from beginning to end. What the hell happened after the first half of 100 Years? He just went off line. WTF. This not only makes me mad as an individual, but rage against a professional/author who betrays his position as a professional/author. Unbelievable, and shocking. What a great story for the first half. Unbelievable. Betrayal.

    6 of 25 people found this review helpful
  • The Other Brain: From Dementia to Schizophrenia, How New Discoveries About the Brain are Revolutionizing Medicine and Science

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By R. Douglas Fields
    • Narrated By Victor Bevine, R. Douglas Fields
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (159)
    Performance
    (105)
    Story
    (107)

    Despite everything that has been written about the brain, a very important part of this vital organ has been overlooked in most books - until now. The Other Brain is the story of glia, which make up approximately 85 percent of the cells in the brain. Long neglected as little more than cerebral packing material ("glia" means glue), glia are sparking a revolution in brain science.

    Douglas says: "Some bit of knowledge in the field of neurology..."
    "A neuroscience story told exceptionally well"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Fields knows how to tell scientific stories as human interest stories, with drama and interest like very few others. He knows what is significant, shares that significance from a scientific point of view in personally engaging ways. If you like neuroscience, this book is for you. Rather than thinking of the "other" brain, I now think of both brains, neuronal and glial as one brain, just like the left and right hemisphere are one brain. A success of both science and story-telling.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • On the Genealogy of Morals: A Polemic

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 33 mins)
    • By Friedrich Nietzsche
    • Narrated By Duncan Steen
    Overall
    (19)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (18)

    In On the Genealogy of Morals, subtitled "A Polemic", Nietzsche furthers his pursuit of a clarity that is less tainted by imposed prejudices. He looks at the way attitudes towards 'morality' evolved and the way congenital ideas of morality were heavily colored by the Judaic and Christian traditions.

    Wayne says: "Be strong, not weak."
    "Be strong, not weak."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    On as many levels as possible, this towering philosopher for the ages, tormented soul and liberated intellectual, has set the bar bar for courage and value, leaving most United States Marines in the dust.

    He established the spiritual, intellectual and physical norm for "weakness leaving the body."

    If you look at his intensity as a war for the individual against false authority (master) and against false submissiveness (slave) you can then understand how his battle is to establish true value in life, as opposed to false submissiveness or brute authoritarianism. Enjoy.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Joyland

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 33 mins)
    • By Stephen King
    • Narrated By Michael Kelly
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3034)
    Performance
    (2806)
    Story
    (2808)

    Set in a small-town North Carolina amusement park in 1973, Joyland tells the story of the summer in which college student Devin Jones comes to work as a carny and confronts the legacy of a vicious murder, the fate of a dying child, and the ways both will change his life forever. Joyland is a brand-new novel and has never previously been published.

    Cozy Reader says: "The sweest and creepiest coming of age story!"
    "The New King: Character over Terror"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It is natural to develop and transform throughout the life cycle. "It" was a classic in terror, perhaps unequaled, and much lamented in wanting another. However, King is a master story-teller, perhaps his true core.

    Now his core is telling a story, in "Joyland" that is perhaps one of the richest character development stories of his career. He seems to relish in making every second sentence of personal significance through humor and observation in the context and character of his story (as opposed to George Carlin--gut wrenching humor).

    As others have observed, this is not the same as his "It" novel, (although it is a ghost story), but in its place is a character development, play of romance, coming of age novel in which "it" becomes sex. Is this a loss of story-telling, or a maturation of story-telling? I vote for the later. Enjoy.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One Is

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By Friedrich Nietzsche
    • Narrated By Steven Van Doren
    Overall
    (43)
    Performance
    (20)
    Story
    (20)

    Ecce homo, "behold the man", are the words Friedrich Nietzsche chose as the title for his literary self-portrait. A main purpose of the book was to offer Nietzsche's own perspective on his work as a philosopher and human being. Ecce Homo also forcefully repudiates those interpretations of his previous works purporting to find support there for imperialism, anti-Semitism, militarism, and Social Darwinism.

    w22w says: "Bombastic, Fantastic?"
    "Revolutionary"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It is interesting how this is also a summary of his own works, a commentary on Nietzsche by Nietzsche. It is not only a summary of the minute daily observations and habits he has worked out for his well being (despite incredible physical suffering), but how he is, in the face of suffering, nevertheless affirmative of life. However, far from focusing on the minutia of his life, he is actually founding the value of life on a revolutionary view of life as independent of classic morality which had dominated society in the form of Christianity (the dominant force of moralism at his time), and in the form of German Idealism (rationalism and moralism as reflected in the Kantian categorical imprerative). In place of historical and religious false valuation, Nietzsche advocates the spirit of Dionysus (versus Apolo), to live creatively, energetically and courageously in the spirit of Zarathustra, his magnus opus.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Inferno: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By Dan Brown
    • Narrated By Paul Michael
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (9919)
    Performance
    (8989)
    Story
    (9064)

    In the heart of Italy, Harvard professor of symbology, Robert Langdon, is drawn into a harrowing world centered on one of history’s most enduring and mysterious literary masterpieces: Dante’s Inferno. Against this backdrop, Langdon battles a chilling adversary and grapples with an ingenious riddle that pulls him into a landscape of classic art, secret passageways, and futuristic science. Drawing from Dante’s dark epic poem, Langdon races to find answers and decide whom to trust...before the world is irrevocably altered.

    Livia says: "Formulaic and Hard to Finish...."
    "Dante's Code: crack it--or ELSE!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    If you like continually not knowing what is going to happen next, and discovering the next harrowing clue and dangerous predicament, then this classic Dan Brown scavenger hunt with cataclysmic implications is for you.

    Constructed around the symbology of Dante's Inferno, this is a fast action adventure through fascinating historical cities by the familiar protagonist Robert Langdon, and a freaky-smart attractive leading lady (Angelina Jolie?)

    It gets a little slow around the end of the first third of the book, then takes off again.

    Nothing is ever what you expect.

    This is the definition of suspense.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Soul Catcher

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Michael C. White
    • Narrated By William Dufris
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (32)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (5)

    Cain is a scarred but proud man haunted by a terrible skill: the ability to track people who don't want to be found. Rosetta is a runaway slave fueled by the passion and determination only a mother can feel. And she will risk everything for the promise of freedom.

    David says: "More personal than historical"
    "Excellent story of love, character, and slavery"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is ultimately a love story, also a story of revelation of character development as well as character degradation--those you hope to obtain love and those you love to hate. This was a very meaningful revelation of the slavery period of our nation, the issues and dealing with these issues very sensitively and effectively--who ever heard of a slave (soul)-catcher? Very enjoyable and coherent story--well constructed and developed. Excellent fiction and story telling.-- miss the characters already:the good (Cain), the bad (Eberly), the ugly (Preacher) and the beautiful Rosetta.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Beyond Good and Evil

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Friedrich Nietzsche
    • Narrated By Alex Jennings, Roy McMillan
    Overall
    (199)
    Performance
    (132)
    Story
    (128)

    Continuing where Thus Spoke Zarathustra left off, Nietzsche's controversial work Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most influential philosophical texts of the 19th century and one of the most controversial works of ideology ever written. Attacking the notion of morality as nothing more than institutionalised weakness, Nietzsche criticises past philosophers for their unquestioning acceptance of moral precepts. Nietzsche tried to formulate what he called "the philosophy of the future".

    Diverse says: "Great Book, great Audio Narration"
    "Troubled Genius"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Nietzsche's analysis and critique of false authority, master-slave relationships, herd morality, rationalistic/scientific barriers to living fearlessly are amazing critiques for the time he wrote, and flew in the face of the rationalistic zeitgeist of Kant, Hegel and science.

    His critique is very psychological, in that he does not himself present a rationalistic argument for or against his views (although he reveals brilliant thinking), but rather a series of observations/aphorisms which we automatically string together as his "philosophy" (and then wonder what he said). He makes scathing observations of the Jews being the cause of the despised master-slave relationships, and compounded by Christians. For sure, he despises weakness.

    Because of his own questioning of human motivation leading to the destructive master-slave devaluation of human, I find myself analyzing his own motivation for his concerns. While his interpretation of women parallels hatred of weakness everywhere, his misogyny, mistrust and devaluation seems embedded in every pore of his being, and explains most of his philosophy as a rant against how his mother (including father) treated him. He describes women as like a cat, they do their own thing, they have claws waiting to strike and are fundamentally manipulative and shallow.

    If my impression of Nietzsche's devaluation of human relationships (esp. with women) is accurate (his self/other esteem is relationally absent), then he is blind and in contempt (indignant) of any relational resolution to his existential predicament. His primary target therefore is anyone who presents a threat to him, his thinking, his power/right to live fully.

    More interestingly, this theory helps explain the either/or, master/slave position which he takes as the truth of the human condition. Since psyche (which is conditioned by society he states)/people/society/ bad philosophers/scientists/politics/countries are not to be trusted, the first goal is to avoid being a slave of your own weak conscience or that of anyone else's, have the courage to be master of your own soul, and do not be afraid of your passions/instincts/impulses, but let them give you instinctive taste/guidance, power, freedom of will, nobility--not made weak by conscience.

    His use of the term "Truth" is almost always stated in some disdainful way against others, especially philosopher metaphysicians who go around telling others what "Truth" is. His effort is to invert this terrible misconception, and restore the meaning of truth as ones own Will to Truth (which becomes Will to Power), the power to be who you are based on your own value. The ultimate truth in life is thus to embrace the value of your own power. He often speaks positively of artists who engage in their expressive, empowered freedom in life (i.e., Wagner).


    He states that "all organic functions [including sexuality] could be traced back to this Will to Power" (36)--this is his claim about reality/truth. There are thus two reading of Nietzsche--the amoral, harsh, cynical, heartlessness, and the one that some of us would like to believe: that his thoughts just haven't been developed clearly and that he is more artistic in his nature (and that Santa Claus and Heaven are not in jeopardy). It is not hard to see why his ideas became usable for Hitler's regime. We can thank subsequent philosophers who salvaged his genius out of his darkness.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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