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TM

TJM

ratings
63
REVIEWS
53
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
2
HELPFUL VOTES
80

  • Failure Is Not an Option: Mission Control from Mercury to Apollo 13 and Beyond

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Gene Kranz
    • Narrated By Danny Campbell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (452)
    Performance
    (417)
    Story
    (416)

    Gene Kranz was present at the creation of America's manned space program and was a key player in it for three decades. As a flight director in NASA's Mission Control, Kranz witnessed firsthand the making of history. He participated in the space program from the early days of the Mercury program to the last Apollo mission, and beyond. He endured the disastrous first years when rockets blew up and the United States seemed to fall further behind the Soviet Union in the space race.

    TM says: "Dry Insights in to the Space Program"
    "Dry Insights in to the Space Program"
    Overall
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    Any additional comments?

    I was hoping to love this book and it does give an interesting inside look at many aspects of the Mercury and Apollo missions, but what made Gene Kranz a great Nasa mission controller does not make him an engaging author.

    The stories are full of interesting facts, but there is little-to-no drama in the writing, even when recounting the most dramatic of events, such as the Apollo 13 mission. All NASA folk seem to be well trained in handling the media. Everything is upbeat, succinct and politically correct. This is very important to NASA's success, but this mind-set has carried in to this book. So it is rather unemotional and dry.

    Worth a listen for NASA fans, but certainly not enthralling.

    By the way it is clear that Gene Kranz was a vital player in the space program's success and I think we should all be grateful to him.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters; From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By James Mahaffey
    • Narrated By Tom Weiner
    Overall
    (252)
    Performance
    (235)
    Story
    (234)

    From the moment radiation was discovered in the late nineteenth century, nuclear science has had a rich history of innovative scientific exploration and discovery, coupled with mistakes, accidents, and downright disasters.

    Jim In Texas! says: "Fascinating Stories, Easily Digested Numbers"
    "Almost Black Humor"
    Overall
    Performance
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    Extremely well written, thoroughly informative and often utterly hilarious.

    I understand that sounds weird to say, given that it is a book of nuclear disasters (and I do feel uneasy saying it), but the way in which these stories are told, and the fact that that most of these disasters seems to be down to a human being having a Laurel and Hardy moment with one of humanity's most dangerous scientific discovery turns out to be quite effective at tickling my funny bone.

    I came away thinking that if we could just learn to harness this genie in a bottle it would solve all our energy needs. But I know I wouldn't want to live near something that is a human blunder away from "prompt critical".

    Thoroughly recommended.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Born Standing Up: A Comic's Life

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Steve Martin
    • Narrated By Steve Martin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2934)
    Performance
    (1517)
    Story
    (1509)

    In the mid-70s, Steve Martin exploded onto the comedy scene. By 1978 he was the biggest concert draw in the history of stand-up. In 1981 he quit forever. Born Standing Up is, in his own words, the story of "why I did stand-up and why I walked away".

    Andrew says: "Fantastic"
    "Short and Serious"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    The Jerk is one of my favorite films and I've enjoyed many of his other films, but Steve Martin strikes me as a man who is somewhat embarrassed by his best work and wants to be taken much more seriously.

    In the book we learn that his father seemed uncomfortable with his son's less than cerebral visual comedy and perhaps thats why Mr. Martin seems to overcompensate in interviews and in this short autobiography. Whilst there is much of interest for those looking for an inside view of the world of stand-up comedy, there is also much dry and serious analysis of how philosophy, art and cultural forces informed the many average jokes he proceeds to recite (out of character).

    To me Steve Martin was funny mostly for the characters he created and his physical performance. Not for his word-play, stories, or zingers.

    Not once did I guffaw, nor even chortle. This is not a funny book. Extracting jokes from their context and discussing them, sap all of the magic and joy from them.

    I did smile once in a while reflecting on the comedy-acting masterpieces captured in The Jerk and on SNL. But it seems Mr. Martin is determined to demonstrate his intellectual chops rather than entertain his readers.

    I still love him for giving me some of the funniest moments of movie/television magic I have known.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Kokoda (by Peter FitzSimons)

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Peter FitzSimons
    • Narrated By Lewis FitzGerald
    Overall
    (248)
    Performance
    (217)
    Story
    (223)

    For Australians, Kokoda is the iconic battle of World War II, yet few people know just what happened and just what our troops achieved. Now, best-selling author Peter FitzSimons tells the Kokoda story in a gripping, moving story for all Australians.

    Mark T Ryan says: "A Tribute to Fighting Australians"
    "Is There No Way Out?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Where does Kokoda rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    This audiobook is now in my top 5!


    What did you like best about this story?

    I'm pretty well versed with World War 2 from the European perspective and somewhat familiar with the US parts of the war in the Pacific, but this was my first exposure to the Australian perspective.

    One of the great things about this book is how well written it is. The author zooms in to heart-wrenching accounts of individual experiences and the costs of war, zooms out to the international politics of the allied forces, and then back in again to the tactical decision making of the officers. All done effortlessly and captivatingly.


    What about Lewis FitzGerald’s performance did you like?

    Narrator has a clear, solid voice and deliver the material effortlessly. I am very pleased the narrator is Australian. This is such a quintessentially Australian story with quintessentially Australian characters. Nothing else would do.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    There were a great many. A few examples....

    The pastor who decided to bury a killed soldier in mid combat as the bullets flew, and that both sides stopped and waited until he had completed his task.

    The brothers singing together in camp, with one trying to shake off the sick feeling that his brother would soon be dead.

    The soldier who after being shot badly in the belly, asks himself "Is this real, am I really going to die? Is there no way out?".


    Any additional comments?

    You'd be a fool to pass this one up!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Walter Isaacson
    • Narrated By Dennis Boutsikaris
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1095)
    Performance
    (952)
    Story
    (943)

    Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, The Innovators is Walter Isaacson’s revealing story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. It is destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens. What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail?

    Mark says: "A History of the Ancient Geeks"
    "Solid Accounts, Lacks Inspiration"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    Walter Isaacson is, in my experience a pretty rigorous biographer and I suppose techno-historian. I have read (listened) to other works of his including Steve Jobs.

    However, I find there is always a little something missing. The magic, the excitement, the passion. The moments of discovery. The colliding personalities. So much grist for engaging your readership. But alas, such books are not the author's style.

    Certainly interesting and worth the read, but as a big fan of "Entrepreneur" stories like Masters of Doom, iWoz, I'm Feeling Lucky, this book leaves me a little underwhelmed.

    A good account of an amazing period in human history, but know what your getting.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • 10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found a Self-Help That Actually Works

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Dan Harris
    • Narrated By Dan Harris
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1896)
    Performance
    (1673)
    Story
    (1666)

    After having a nationally televised panic attack on Good Morning America, Dan Harris knew he had to make some changes. A lifelong nonbeliever, he found himself on a bizarre adventure, involving a disgraced pastor, a mysterious self-help guru, and a gaggle of brain scientists.

    Patrick says: "Mandatory read before trying any self-help books"
    "Nuggets of Usefulness"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    Given the condescending and overly simplistic tone of pretty much every American TV news person, I was a bit worried this book would be a well polished empty vessel. However, I trusted the Audible community's reviews and was well rewarded.

    Dan Harris the author is more honest, open and relatable than I expected and whilst his journey of discovery may be more a narrative tool than absolute truth, his tale of "contemporary mindset meets ancient wisdoms" connected with me.

    I found myself writing down factoids and quotes and have (a month or so on) found I still mentally refer to bits and pieces and am continuing to meditate.

    Nicely done Dan Harris for turning a professional nightmare in to a teachable moment.

    Thanks also for not promising the world as so many self-help books do. 10% happier and gaining.

    That works for me!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • How to Win an Election: An Ancient Guide for Modern Politicians

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 5 mins)
    • By Quintus Tullius Cicero, Philip Freeman
    • Narrated By Doug Kaye
    Overall
    (124)
    Performance
    (115)
    Story
    (114)

    How to Win an Election is an ancient Roman guide for campaigning that is as up-to-date as tomorrow's headlines. In 64 BC when idealist Marcus Cicero, Rome's greatest orator, ran for consul (the highest office in the Republic), his practical brother Quintus decided he needed some no-nonsense advice on running a successful campaign.

    Benedict says: "How to be a politician ..."
    "Not Marcus Tullius Cicero"
    Overall
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    Any additional comments?

    Just to be clear these are the words of Quintus Tullius Cicero, the younger brother of the famous Marcus Tullius Cicero. So if you're looking for the well known historical figure's words of wisdom, these are not them, but they are close.

    Close, because they are a list of political insights that mostly hold true to this day and are worthy of a listen for anyone interested in bringing history to life and discovering how little things have changed.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Destiny Disrupted: A History of the World through Islamic Eyes

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By Tamim Ansary
    • Narrated By Tamim Ansary
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (581)
    Performance
    (423)
    Story
    (414)

    Until about 1800, the West and the Islamic realm were like two adjacent, parallel universes, each assuming itself to be the center of the world while ignoring the other. As Europeans colonized the globe, the two world histories intersected and the Western narrative drove the other one under. The West hardly noticed, but the Islamic world found the encounter profoundly disrupting.

    David says: "A history of the world before the West mattered"
    "Very Welcoming Look in to the Islamic World"
    Overall
    Performance
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    Any additional comments?

    If you are largely ignorant of Islamic history and culture I can't imagine a more comprehensive whilst still approachable book on the subject.

    I particularly liked the wry humor of the author which comes across beautifully in his narration of his own work.

    Thanks Mr. Ansary for helping to bridge the cultural gap.

    Heartily recommended!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Solving the Procrastination Puzzle: A Concise Guide to Strategies for Change

    • UNABRIDGED (2 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Timothy A. Pychyl
    • Narrated By Timothy A. Pychyl
    Overall
    (302)
    Performance
    (257)
    Story
    (250)

    The new audio edition of the self-published hit, offering powerful strategies to end procrastination!

    Why do we sabotage our own best intentions? How can we eliminate procrastination from our lives for good? Based on current psychological research and supplemented with clear strategies for change, this concise guide will help listeners finally break free from self-destructive ideas and habits, and move into freedom and accomplishment.

    Sara says: "A Procrastinator at Work Right Before Your Eyes"
    "Make a Start"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    The only memorable nugget I got from this book....

    "Make a start".

    If you're procrastinating, just say that to yourself. It helped me a little, but as with most self-help books this one delivers a few bullets worth of content wrapped in blurb. At least it is short and sweet.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Philip Lymbery, Isabel Oakeshott
    • Narrated By Julian Elfer
    Overall
    (60)
    Performance
    (56)
    Story
    (58)

    Farm animals have been disappearing from our fields as the production of food has become a global industry. We no longer know for certain what is entering the food chain and what we are eating - as the UK horsemeat scandal demonstrated. We are reaching a tipping point as the farming revolution threatens our countryside, health, and the quality of our food wherever we live in the world.

    Grazyna says: "Excellent insight of industrial farming"
    "On The Wrong Track"
    Overall
    Performance
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    Any additional comments?

    You only need to have little bit of common sense to see that monocultures are a bad idea. You only need a little bit of compassion to feel that the way modern farming practices treat animals is wrong.
    You only need a little bit of conviction to change your grocery shopping habits, just a little at first, then perhaps snowballing in to finding yourself buying mostly local, mostly organic, mostly plant-based, and so on.

    Start the journey and see where it takes you. I feel good because the food I eat is healthier AND because the food-systems I support with my purchases makes the world a bit happier.

    Listen to this book if you want a catalyst for making the change.

    0 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Man Who Killed Kennedy: The Case Against LBJ

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Roger Stone
    • Narrated By David Rapkin
    Overall
    (133)
    Performance
    (121)
    Story
    (123)

    Lyndon Baines Johnson was a man of great ambition and enormous greed, both of which, in 1963, would threaten to destroy him. In the end, President Johnson would use power from his personal connections in Texas and from the underworld and from the government to escape an untimely end in politics and to seize even greater power. President Johnson, the thirty-sixth president of the United States, was the driving force behind a conspiracy to murder President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963. In The Man Who Killed Kennedy, you will find out how and why he did it. Political consultant, strategist, and Libertarian Roger Stone has gathered documents and used his firsthand knowledge to construct the ultimate tome to prove that LBJ was not only involved in JFK's assassination, but was in fact the mastermind. With 2013 being the fiftieth anniversary of JFK's assassination, this is the perfect time for The Man Who Killed Kennedy to be available to readers. The research and information in this book is unprecedented, and as Roger Stone lived through it, he's the perfect person to bring it to everyone's attention.

    Theo Tsourdalakis says: "COMPELLING BOOK - THE CROOKS ARE IN POWER"
    "Disturbingly Believable"
    Overall
    Performance
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    Any additional comments?

    I try not to buy in to conspiracy theories and I only bought this audiobook because it was on sale and the reviews here and on other websites were pretty good, but wow!

    I kinda found it very believable.

    Certainly without doing my own research I have to take the author's facts at face value. But even if only 50% of the facts are accurate, LBJ certainly seemed like a man of massive ego and hugely questionable morals who certainly had the power, connections and motive to clear the way for his own presidency.

    It was certainly a very ugly period in US history and there are so many theories, so many movies, books and documentaries about the events, it can be hard to separate the wheat from the chaff. But this book read fresh and rigorous and I was left feeling uneasy and that he should have been at least a leading suspect in any true investigation.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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