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Stephen

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  • Robert B. Parker's Killing the Blues: A Jesse Stone Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Michael Brandman
    • Narrated By Robert B. Parker, James Naughton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (112)
    Performance
    (96)
    Story
    (98)

    Paradise, Massachusetts, is preparing for the summer tourist season when a string of car thefts disturbs what is usually a quiet time in town. In a sudden escalation of violence, the thefts become murder, and chief of police Jesse Stone finds himself facing one of the toughest cases of his career. Pressure from the town politicians only increases when another crime wave puts residents on edge. Jesse confronts a personal dilemma as well: a burgeoning relationship with a young PR executive, whose plans to turn Paradise into a summertime concert destination may have her running afoul of the law.

    S. Wells says: "NOT Parker"
    "NOT Parker"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was desperately hoping that this book would defy the usual pattern of a new author failing to adequately take over an old author's story line and characters. I was badly disappointed. Jesse Stone is NOT in character in some significant ways in this story. For example, I cannot imagine Parker's Jesse cavalierly shucking Sunny Randall just because she went to Europe for a job, and falling rapidly into bed with a shallow young woman just because she chased him. Molly is also out of character for most of the story, demonstrating a hardness that was never seen before; as is Lt. Healy, who appears to be Jesse's errand boy, rather than a powerful cop in his own right. I mostly read Parker's stories for the excellent characters and character development rather than the plot, and plot alone cannot hold this story up. Parker, like any good writer, SHOWS his story, doesn't TELL it. This writer tells, actually preaches at times. Even the premise of the story--that Jesse was vicious enough in L.A. to beat a criminal into brain damage--is so out of character for Parker's Jesse Stone that it strains credibility past breaking. Parker's Jesse is a violent man, not a mean one; and even drunkenness does not change basic character. Overall, even the excellent narration cannot make up for the flawed plot and poor characterizations. Not worth the hearing, and certainly not worth another, or another book.

    9 of 9 people found this review helpful

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