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Shannon

ratings
139
REVIEWS
15
FOLLOWING
1
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
16

  • Omens

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Kelley Armstrong
    • Narrated By Carine Montbertrand, Mozhan Marno
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (294)
    Performance
    (271)
    Story
    (274)

    Twenty-four-year-old Olivia Taylor Jones has the perfect life. The only daughter of a wealthy, prominent Chicago family, she has an Ivy League education, pursues volunteerism and philanthropy, and is engaged to a handsome young tech firm CEO with political ambitions. But Olivia’s world is shattered when she learns that she’s adopted. Her real parents? Todd and Pamela Larsen, notorious serial killers serving a life sentence.

    Kim says: "Great start to a new series, but... CRINGE!"
    "A Great Start of a New Series"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you listen to Omens again? Why?

    Attention grabbing, a lot of action, mystery, questions.


    Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

    Yes, because it grabbed your attention and drags you into the characters. It is a situation inside of a mystery that leads into a bigger story. The story ends perfectly with just enough questions to make you look forward to the next book in the series, the Cainville Series or Chronicles would be a good name. A mystery that makes you question motives, intentions with revelations that ask more questions, but not in an irritating way, in a "I can't wait to hear this story" kind of way. Highly recommend anyone who likes book series and dealing with old unknown and forgotten forces that humankind has either forgot or demonized.


    Have you listened to any of Carine Montbertrand and Mozhan Marno ’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    No, this is the first time I have heard the two together.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    Neither, I felt very drawn in almost immediately.


    Any additional comments?

    I have read and listened to Kelley Armstrong's books before, and I am not so much interested in book series. However, she is an excellent writer and does know how to peek your interest in her novels without confusing the reader. I loved the way this one came together and I love how the story involves several areas, but is grounded in a small town that is welcoming and a little mysterious in a good way. I cannot wait for the next one.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Good House

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Tananarive Due
    • Narrated By Robin Miles
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1758)
    Performance
    (1101)
    Story
    (1093)

    Tananarive Due, author of The Living Blood won the American Book Award and is praised as Stephen King's equal by Publishers Weekly. In The Good House, Due sets a story of ancient powers and modern retribution in a small Pacific Northwest town. When a young woman returns to her grandmother's empty mansion, she is pitted against demonic forces that have poisoned her family for generations.

    Rebecca says: "FABULOUS!"
    ""Out of hell leads up to light" Merchant of Venice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about The Good House?

    It is not always the case that you have a story with a certain genre and the details that were in this story that actually is well written. I really liked the true knowledge and honesty about a belief system that has been viewed in a negative way. I loved the characters in that none of them were "bad" and I really liked the portrayal of black men as not being violent, maladjusted or stereotypical but in a way that resembles my friends. The story is as if a part of history that needs to be remembered and not talked about or forgotten. I may be politicizing it and it is not a political story, but it does make a statement of social issues and in a more positive way
    It had the suspense/thriller that I like with paranormal type of stories and a mystery that needs to be solved. Tananarive Due does a brilliant job of combining all these things together and weave them, and it does give you the feeling that it is woven like a tapestry.


    What other book might you compare The Good House to and why?

    I am not sure about books so much as other authors in the same or similar genre. Stephen King writes his stories in a similar way so that all questions are answered at the completion of the story. John Saul is another good story teller with most of his books and both make a social statement in the present or "that was then, this is now, but we still have things to work on."


    Which character – as performed by Robin Miles – was your favorite?

    Robin Miles is an excellent reader and there needs to be more of her caliber reading stories. She did all the voices so well that you knew who was speaking or thinking. Some other readers can do this, but I really loved and was very impressed with the way she was able to get the New Orleans French Creole accent and if I had to pick a favorite character that she portrayed it would have to be Marie.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I am not certain about extreme, but I would say it was interesting from a historical and even a bit of theoretical given it was an honest look at Vodou (Haitian), Vodun (West African) but many know as Voodoo and that was impressive. I would imagine if I read it I would say it is a page turner. It is the kind of story that makes you want to look up some of the subject matter to find out more about things and learn some thing new.


    Any additional comments?

    I would recommend this audiobook to anyone. The story was great, the narration was perfect and it kept your attention.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Siren

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By John Everson
    • Narrated By Lyssa Graham
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (8)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (8)

    Night after night, Evan walked along the desolate beach, grieving over the loss of his own son, drowned in an accident more than a year before.Then one night he was drawn to the luminous sound of a beautiful, naked woman singing near the shore in the moonlight. He watched mesmerized as the mysterious woman disappeared into the sea. Driven by desire and temptation, Evan returned to the spot every night until he found her again. Now he has begun a bizarre, otherworldly affair. A deadly affair. For Evan will soon realize that his seductive lover is a being far more evil.

    Shannon says: "Men are so stupid, this is why women are smarter"
    "Men are so stupid, this is why women are smarter"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes, it is not a bad story if you like stories that delve into myths and legends, which I do, but it may not be everyone's cup of tea. It was not a horror book so much as a mixture of a couple different things, ancient myths, the modern day, mystery, some action and drama. The story was not bad until the end. I did not like the way it ended thus the headline.


    What other book might you compare Siren to and why?

    Not sure.


    Which character – as performed by Lyssa Graham – was your favorite?

    Bill, he was the funny one and sarcastic and added some lightheartedness to it that I felt made the book more fun to listen to.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Yes because if you don't you will miss some important things as there are two time lines in the story but it is done in a way that does not make it confusing. At first you are a little, but then it dawns on you quickly that there are two different stories being told and what ties the stories together.


    Any additional comments?

    I didn't think the narrators was too bad. I have heard a lot worse. Her voice is soothing and relaxing and as she goes on telling the story she becomes more animated. She does the voices rather well. It is a pretty good story, the plot was not full of holes or was so confusing that you couldn't understand it without using Cliffnotes. There are some things that are typical but maybe not in the way you think of. Hence the headline comment. The main character behaved in a typical fashion for most of the book but he did break out of the type a couple of times. Wish it had a bett4er ending but I can see where that could have been more difficult to do.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Six Years

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Harlan Coben
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3246)
    Performance
    (2800)
    Story
    (2821)

    Six years have passed since Jake Fisher watched Natalie, the love of his life, marry another man. Six years of hiding a broken heart by throwing himself into his career as a college professor. Six years of keeping his promise to leave Natalie alone, and six years of tortured dreams of her life with her new husband, Todd. But six years haven’t come close to extinguishing his feelings, and when Jake comes across Todd’s obituary, he can’t keep himself away from the funeral. There he gets the glimpse of Todd’s wife he’s hoping for...but she is not Natalie....

    G. House Sr. says: "Obsession, mystery, and you're hooked!"
    "Hearing a man whine reminded me of being married."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What disappointed you about Six Years?

    The constant whining about his lost love, made me want to slap the crap out of him.


    What was most disappointing about Harlan Coben’s story?

    The broken and damaged man telling the story. He went on and on about how he found the perfect woman and much she broke his heart. I have not heard someone whine this much since I got a midnight drunken call from an ex boyfriend. Who has time for it.


    What three words best describe Scott Brick’s voice?

    I have heard him narrate other books and he is ok. I am not sure if he was trying to set the stage or mood of a story about a whiny many you want to hit or if he just was having a very bad day or something.


    What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

    Annoyance, feeling like I was babysitting and not getting paid.


    Any additional comments?

    Some say women do this, but I find more often than not that men are just as bad when it comes to broken hearts. If you enjoy listening to someone constantly talk about their broken heart after so many years and not have one friend of their's tell them they need professional help, this is the story for you. It is like dealing with some obsessive freak and everyone else reacts like it is normal when you feel like you are taking crazy pills.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Demon of Brownsville Road: A Pittsburgh Family's Battle with Evil in Their Home

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Bob Cranmer, Erica Manfred
    • Narrated By Michael Prichard
    Overall
    (16)
    Performance
    (16)
    Story
    (16)

    As a young boy, Bob had been drawn to the property, and, just when the family decided to move back to Brentwood, it went up for sale. Without a second thought, they purchased the house that Bob had always dreamed of owning. But the family soon began experiencing strange phenomena - objects moving on their own, ghostly footsteps, unsettling moaning sounds - that gradually increased in violence, escalating to physical assaults and, most disturbingly, bleeding walls.

    R. Fernuik says: "Off topic and self-aggrandizing"
    "Preachy, people with religious problems"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What would have made The Demon of Brownsville Road better?

    Can't say, could only stand about 40 minutes of it. Too preachy. Felt like I was at a fundamental service. Some things bothered me, like a bit of xenophobia or problems with any one who is not white, and I am a white person.


    What do you think your next listen will be?

    Not this. But, if you are the type that likes to take about how religious you are and how much better you are to other people, this is the book for you. The background story was ok, but show me a kid who doesn't rebel and I'll show you a person who more than likely never be respected in life.


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    As well as one could.


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    No. I felt like I was watching the 700 club, Pat Robertson or any other religious nut job. I don't care what people want to believe, but I felt as if it was trying to convert me and I hear enough about this crap from the right-wing nut Congress.


    Any additional comments?

    While I do not believe it is bad to have a belief system, I kept getting the feeling that it was a bit elitist in it's talk about religiousness. I have my own faith, but I do not like anything that is preachy and I don't go around talking about my spiritual belief and how my way is the only way and that any one who does not think like me is wrong. Also, I was in the Army Intel and it is not like the guys states, it is probably one of the most corrupt of the areas to go into with the upper enlisted and officers just as messed up, backwards and without morals than the worst kind of anti religious person one can meet. Maybe he was an ok guy, but I really do not like to listen to an Army officer who has no idea about being enlisted. Plus, it is not as if his rebellion was a satanic thing, it is more of a privileged of youth.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • The Fury

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 23 mins)
    • By John Farris
    • Narrated By Scott Minor
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    The Fury combines horror and science fiction with the conventions of the suspense-thriller genre.

    Gillian Bellaver is from one of the wealthiest and most powerful families in the world. Robin Sandza's father, Peter, is one of the United States government's deadliest assassins. Gillian and Robin are from two different worlds. Outside they have nothing in common. Yet they are spiritual twins, possessors of a horrifying psychic energy that threatens humanity.

    Shannon says: "One you will want to listen to several times"
    "One you will want to listen to several times"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about The Fury?

    It deals with an interesting subject and consequences of it.


    What did you like best about this story?

    The idea of reincarnation and being with particular people over and over again in different lives, about traveling in a place where many humans fear to go and about the relationships of those that can exist sometimes with our conscious and/or unconscious minds. It was a very intriguing story of two souls who have been together in various types of relationships but always together in all their past lives and how they decided how to be together in the present one as brother and sister. However, due to a delivery problem, one soul is born and the other soul is displaced and must find another body so they can be born together. The births of both occur during a astronomical and astrological alignment that makes them special. As they grow older, they are connected not as twins as we know it but as spiritual twins. There is a lot of detail in the story but you may not catch all of in one reading. It is one of those stories that when you listen to it again, you learn something new. It also illustrates very well not only the closeness of the two involved, but of more sinister and insidious powers that would use this power for their own gain and rise to power. It is a remarkable story of the journey of thees two young teenagers and the adults around them and the danger that one is in when he no longer acts accordingly.
    Very detailed and well written. It was probably one of the first really good stories regarding psychic ability and what can happen as a result of powers that be infuriate one of them.


    Have you listened to any of Scott Minor’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    This is the first book I have listened to that he has done, but I really liked his narration. His voice is soft and soothing but he makes clear, as well as the way John Farris wrote the different personalities, to know who was who. I am sure if he were to do it over, he might add some things to it like amplifying the different personalities, but I think he did a great job.


    If you could rename The Fury, what would you call it?

    Because the actual "damage" or harming has to do with the strong emotion of anger in some situations but not all, it would be difficult to find another title. You begin to understand just what the fury is and what can bring it about. I thought maybe something along the lines of "The Twin Souls" or "Spiritual Twins" but it sounds like a metaphysical type book.


    Any additional comments?

    It took a second listen to understand that the two main characters were always connected to each other, then one forgets while the other doesn't until much later. Gillian is from a very wealthy and power family however, they do not make her a snob or have a feeling of entitlement and she is a very compassionate and empathetic girl of privilege, but in no way spoiled or self centered. It shows how uncommonly kind some in her "crowd" are. Robin is not a child of privilege but it happy nonetheless because of his relationship with his father. It was also good that these kids were not just two stupid, naive kids but had an understanding of who and what they are in a way that most of us do not understand. I liked the loyalty the essentially have to each other though one of them becomes so traumatized that it literally drives his insane and in his insanity, he begins to do cruel things to his "twin" and how the other twin desperately tries to find the other in the hopes that they will be revived and become rehabilitated. I also thought the idea of government or private entities using kids like these and discard them after they are finished with them leaving them forever in an unstable state, twisted and burned out.
    The relationship between the kid and their "parents" is not one of non concern or pawning them off on other people except in the situation where one is a single parent and needs someone to care for his son while he is "working." In fact, there is a genuine love and concern by the parents towards their children.
    One theme I thought was very interesting is that a couple of times in the story either states or infers that instead of seeing kids like this as special, there is no way to assimilate into their society as opposed to more primitive cultures are and yet we think our culture is superior. The basic inference is that people will destroy things it can not understand and I think that describes the more "advanced" societies.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Maze: The Lost Labyrinth

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 18 mins)
    • By Jason Brannon
    • Narrated By Ed Hunter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (9)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (9)

    Built by angels and demons and filled with traps and riddles, The Maze gives whoever enters a face-to-face encounter with their sins. For Jamie, The Maze becomes a terrifying journey through a world of darkness where his soul and the lives of those he loves hang in the balance. With his family in danger and his soul in peril, Jamie is forced to reevaluate the kind of man he truly is as he struggles to escape The Maze before it s too late.

    Benin B. says: "Very Intelligent Writing"
    "Good for those who like Fox News and Tea Party"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What would have made The Maze better?

    Less nonsense about being "holy" or religious enough, less judgmental of others, no elitism that makes you feel as if you are at some bulls**t tent revival or having to listen to these fire and brimstone ministers that pop up wanting people's month. I felt it cheapened any spirituality and replaced it with a lot of dogma, highly edited versions of the way powers that be want. I felt as if I was listening to the idiots of Fox news, the religions right and the idiotic people we have running the country. I does make Americans sound like a bunch of ignoramuses who believe all kind of crap that they have been told and cannot think for themselves. Do yourself a favor, unless you really like the "Rapture people" and their version of things, DO NOT BOTHER.


    What do you think your next listen will be?

    Definitely nothing along these story lines. Maybe debauchery and orgies and a lot of drugs.


    Which character – as performed by Ed Hunter – was your favorite?

    Ed Hunter is a good narrator, but I could not finish the book. He did all of them that I heard very well.


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    It ended.


    Any additional comments?

    Do not get this book. What seemed like something that might be interesting, it was so similar to the crap we seem to hear everyday from Sarah Palin, Ted Cruz and the other over religious morons who have some how have taken over the US. I do not know why authors that seem to have some talent want to continuously want to write a book that has been written before the same as the right wingers' books are because they are all about the same thing. This book is complete and utter crap and very disappointing.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Visions: Cainsville, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Kelley Armstrong
    • Narrated By Carine Montbertrand, Mozhan Marno
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (144)
    Performance
    (138)
    Story
    (138)

    Olivia finds a dead woman in her car, dressed to look like her, but the body vanishes before anyone else sees it. Olivia's convinced it's another omen, a sign of impending danger. But then she learns that a troubled young woman went missing just days ago - the same woman Olivia found dead in her car. Someone has gone to great lengths to kill and leave this young woman as a warning. But why? And what role has her new home played in this disturbing murder?

    Shannon says: "Expanding plot"
    "Expanding plot"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes, for any one who loves mythology, especially Celtic, Welsh mythology this is the book for you.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Visions?

    Hard to say, there were a lot of moments that were good and makes you guess what is coming next. For those who read the first book, they know that the center of both books is the small town of Cainsville, an odd little town with a variety of characters, quite literally. Olivia Taylor-Jones aka Eden Larsen, a young woman with a psst that even she does not fully know, searches more about who she is. She is aided by her birth mother's attorney, Gabriel Walsh. Both of their roots are in Cainsville and some of the best parts and the theme that comes into play is the dynamic between these two people. It is not a sexual or love interest but one of true allies. There are times when Liv gets angry with Gabriel but it is short lived as they become closer regarding what they have come to understand about Cainsville and their heritage. Both of their goal is to investigate the murders Liv's birth parents are accused of committing and how it may involve the citizens of Cainsville. It poses many questions and answers some from Omens but you find yourself completely enthralled into the lives of these two characters in particular as they discover that they are pawns in a bigger picture.


    What about Carine Montbertrand and Mozhan Marno ’s performance did you like?

    Yes, they were excellent. I like the way Carine Montbertrand is the primary narrator for Liv from her point of view and how Mozhan Marno narrates for other people's thoughts, feelings and intentions. It works quite well because the reader knows what else was going on around the main character by using one and knowing what else is going on around by using another. It works quite well.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    I would have to say that it was not one particular moment so much as a theme that went throughout the story. Even though Gabriel is usually the one who messes it up, Liv comes to understand that and backs off from him as she gets to know him. I liked the way the bond between the two becomes strong as they become very loyal to each other and have each others' backs throughout the story. I do not know what is in store for the two characters, but they make a great team throughout the story to the point of a best friend type of kinship as they both come to understand what was done to both of them and how their bond deepens.


    Any additional comments?

    It is hard to write any type of review because I really do not want to give the story away. It did not focus on the investigation of the murders so much as it is investigating a murder of someone who has ties to Cainsville and what they are able to find out about the people who live there and the effect that the citizens have had not only on Liv and Gabriel's life but others as well as the two discover their importance or role and how the plans of the townspeople is revealed and how others become interested in the two.
    This is a story that will want to make you talk about to others who have read it to come up with what you think will happen next. There is so many aspects that I found interesting in the series so far that I am wondering how Kelley Armstrong is going to tied it all together in just one more book. I think it would be interesting to have side stories as some authors have done with their books. The Cainsville series so far is a great story that leaves you with a sense of fulfillment and also keeps you wondering what is going to happen in the next book.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Warded Man

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Peter V. Brett
    • Narrated By Pete Bradbury
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3244)
    Performance
    (2550)
    Story
    (2564)

    Peter V. Brett has won accolades from critics, fans and fellow authors alike for this riveting debut novel. The Warded Man features a world where demons stalk the night, hunting humans who have long forgotten the magic of their ancestors. But all is not lost, as some hold out hope that a savior will release humanity from the demons' terrifying reign.

    Meloney says: "Brilliant"
    "A different type of "horror" novel"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about The Warded Man?

    This was a very different sort of novel in that it includes just about every genre in order to create the world in which all of this takes place and is very unique. My understanding is that this takes place in the very distant future where humanity goes through a lot and presently is in a world where demons or demon like creatures rule the lives of the people. There are three POV characters that are followed from early adolescents, or in Rojer's case a young child, to adulthood and what makes them who they are. There are many things I love about this story and it is told in a way that you recognize certain elements that occur in modern day and back in history. There are two societies, Krasia, which is similar to the Eastern cultures but not one in particular, and Anjeers (don't know the spelling as I did not read it but listened to it? based on Western cultures and not one in particular. The world of the Western has become a similar to a Feudal Lord type of society in which the three main characters grow up in. The warded man ventures to Krasia and become involved with a different mindset than the area he comes from. I would say this is more of a drama, fantasy and horror.


    What did you like best about this story?

    I liked the way Peter Brett creates these two societies in such a way that is not prejudice or saying one is better than another but explains them and does not judge them. Though many may be more comfortable with the Western world, the Krasians are very interesting people and the culture was talked about more in the next one in the series. He delves deep in the three POV characters showing their honorable qualities while at the same time showing their flaws and vulnerabilities. All three grow up to have an special skill that make the story very enjoyable. I like the way Peter Brett brings the three characters together in their meeting and their similar convictions of not only survival but of inspiring others. There were so many things that I loved about this book that is it hard to just pick one or two things.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    Some of my favorite scenes include a secondary character from Leesha's life, Bruna, the aged herb gatherer or the village healer. I found her wisdom and influence in Leesha's life to be very solid. I liked how she spoke her mind and would smack people with her staff when they acted a fool. One group of scenes is when Arlen at such a young age goes off on his own and how it shows his courage with being such a young boy and how he develops further and decides that he the master of his destiny. Roojer's life of how his parents died and he had to see it was a bit heartbreaking as is when Arlen is betrayed by his best friend who is like a brother to them. It will be a theme that is probably carried through the series as the main dynamic.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Definitely. It captures you and sucks you into it and you begin to care about the characters and go through what they go through both happy and sad. The characters are not real, but they have the same qualities that we admire in the world while at the same time show their frailties as well. I felt this story, though not real, reflect a lot in society about what we can learn from each other and what we are finally realizing out load as a society. Heroes are not perfect but are still worthy of our admiration.


    Any additional comments?

    I was very take in from the very beginning, which starts in tragedy and shows the three characters and the things they go through, both good and bad, that make them such strong characters. The idea of understanding and learning from each other and of different places is of great interest to me as it just shows that all of us have commonality and are not so different. I do not know if that is what the author intended but that is my perspective.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • What the Night Knows

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Dean Koontz
    • Narrated By Steven Weber
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1601)
    Performance
    (791)
    Story
    (806)

    In the late summer of a long-ago year, a killer arrived in a small city. His name was Alton Turner Blackwood, and in the space of a few months he brutally murdered four families. His savage spree ended only when he himself was killed by the last survivor of the last family, a 14-year-old boy. Half a continent away and two decades later, someone is murdering families again, re-creating in detail Blackwood’s crimes.

    sadee poulsen says: "Koontz is back!"
    "Good atmosphere for creepy, Steven Weber makes it"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Where does What the Night Knows rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    I would have to say that the story was a bit original and the narrator is the one that made if fun to listen to especially when he talks about the POV characters with an exactness that some narrators are not as capable to do. I am not a huge fan of Dean Koontz but he does have some good stories and there are times you want to yell a some of the characters telling them to do or not to do something. It delivered the atmosphere of mystery, suspense, creepiness. All in all it was rather good for a horror book.


    Would you recommend What the Night Knows to your friends? Why or why not?

    I would recommend this to people who like Dean Koontz or would like to read their first Dean Koontz novel. Since I did like this particular story, I would probably recommend it to anyone interested in "getting their feet wet" with a horror, suspense book.


    What about Steven Weber’s performance did you like?

    I thought he was great the way he captures the characters themselves. He does an excellent job with the thoughts and feelings of the characters and I know that is not the easiest thing to do. I especially liked the way he did the two sisters because he nailed it because that is how siblings act and react to each other. It gave me a chuckle which is what I think he intended to do. Excellent reader.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    The part that made me laugh was the dueling sisters. I think all books that have a lot of mystery/suspense in them need a bit of comic relief. I am beginning to think that what makes a good "horror" novel is not the gore scenes if any, but the amount of mystery it has and thriller element that I believe are essential. It does build up slowly but it is worth the wait.


    Any additional comments?

    I like Dean Koontz, but I am not a huge fan and I hate to say that because he is a good writer and it seems that he tries to make statements not so much about how horrible the situation is, but the "horror" that led up to that point or situation to begin with. It is always good when you get some background on the characters of how and why they are the way they are. Not all horror writers can do that and I think Dean Koontz does that very well. I have liked what they have done to the movie versions of his novels and he does write about interesting subjects. All in all, I will continue to read his books.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Hanging Tree: A Novella

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 24 mins)
    • By Michael Phillip Cash
    • Narrated By Dan McGowan
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Enter a world where spirits roam the earth in Michael Phillip Cash's haunting new novella, The Hanging Tree. Set amid the eerie backdrop of Long Island, an area famously steeped in old legend, two young would-be lovers contemplate their future while visits from those who have come before them reveal the lure of fate... and the power of free will.

    Shannon says: "A very unique and fun short story"
    "A very unique and fun short story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Because it has different elements, suspense, comedy, and a curse.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Hard to say, the spirits were great each having their own unique personality which the reader captures perfectly from the first, the old crone to the newer ones. It showed the personalities as being very personable and will remind you of people you know. It is not spoken in old way of speaking, but more modern as they have been there for a long time and picked up on the current vernacular which makes it even better. The living characters are fun too with situations most people may recognize as their own from a time in their own lives. I would have to say the Old Crone who sat there through the years listening in.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    I liked the spirits listening in on the young couple and placing bets as to what would happen, that was funny; I liked the flashbacks as to the origin of the "curse" and the simplicity of breaking it and I like the squabbling between two of the spirits, like an old married couple and I liked that a curse was broken by the simplest of deeds. It is hard to pick just one part because it was a combination of all of it that made it a good story.


    Who was the most memorable character of The Hanging Tree and why?

    Marty, because I have a cousin named Marty but in this case it was used as a not so friendly way and every time someone would call him Marty, he would say "don't call me Marty." They were all special in their own way, but I still chuckle at Marty because it reminds me of Barb Wire when she kept telling people "Don't call me babe!"


    Any additional comments?

    I like short stories because it is something you can read or listen to and it tells a pretty descent story most of the time many of which are significant in long term ways such as Nathaniel Hawthorn's Young Goodman Brown, but this was one that had a beginning and and ending and was simple because of the curse placed upon a family and it shows that the smallest of things is all that is needed to be forgiven for something wrong that was done generations ago. It did show some hypocrisy and the staunch belief and takeover of a reasonably peaceful path by those who are in it for their own good. It had a good ending and there were parts that were funny in a cute way. I think a lot of people would really like this story regardless of age, education background and spiritual preference. It is a good story and I hope others will agree with me.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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