You no longer follow Scott

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Scott

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Scott

Scarborough, ON, Canada | Member Since 2006

112
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 81 reviews
  • 182 ratings
  • 425 titles in library
  • 53 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
4
FOLLOWERS
6

  • Governator: From Muscle Beach to His Quest for the White House, the Improbable Rise of Arnold Schwarzenegger

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Ian Halperin
    • Narrated By Greg Itzin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (25)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (21)

    Investigative journalist and number-one New York Times best-selling author Ian Halperin reveals the true and untold story about this larger-than-life and often outrageous figure. From his childhood in Austria to his rise as a star of American conservative politics, the story of ArnoldSchwarzenegger's life reads like the script of a Hollywood B-movie penned by Horatio Alger.

    Chris says: "A very interesting, well written and read story."
    "Balanced"
    Overall

    A fairly balanced take on Schwarzenegger, from his childhood, bodybuilding days, to Hollywood and the Governor's mansion. Doesn't shy away from the controversies while at the same time is a bit sensationalist at times though that is probably warranted given the subject. The author's inherent fondness for his subject shines through.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail (Oprah's Book Club 2.0)

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Cheryl Strayed
    • Narrated By Bernadette Dunne
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3668)
    Performance
    (3233)
    Story
    (3247)

    At 22, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother's death, her family scattered and her own marriage was soon destroyed. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life: to hike the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State - and to do it alone. She had no experience as a long-distance hiker, and the trail was little more than “an idea, vague and outlandish and full of promise.” But it was a promise of piecing back together a life that had come undone.

    FanB14 says: "Glad I Took the Trip"
    "Works as an adventure travelogue and confessional"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about this story?

    This had been on my wishlist for awhile and I am glad to have finally listened to it. Strayed's memoir of her solo trek on the Pacific Crest Trail has a Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance feel to it - part bio, confessional, travelogue and meditation on resiliency rolled into one. I liked it on all levels and Strayed effectively interweaves reflections on her troubled relationships with her family, ex-husband, and her own personal failings throughout her experiences on the PCT that both inform the listener of her motives as well as illuminate her transformation. Add in some genuinely surprising and suspenseful experiences on the trail and you end up with a narrative that never lags. Strayed's knack for self-deprecating humor keeps all this from being too heavy or melodramatic and the narration aptly captures this. Well worth the listen!


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Kim Zetter
    • Narrated By Joe Ochman
    Overall
    (39)
    Performance
    (35)
    Story
    (34)

    Top cybersecurity journalist Kim Zetter tells the story behind the virus that sabotaged Iran’s nuclear efforts and shows how its existence has ushered in a new age of warfare - one in which a digital attack can have the same destructive capability as a megaton bomb.

    Greg says: "Amazingly detailed, sober and above all, damning"
    "Engrossing cyber whodunit"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about Countdown to Zero Day?

    This is an utterly engrossing true life tale of the coders who unraveled the where when's and how's of the Stuxnet virus. Part cyber detective story, part geopolitical thriller, Countdown to Zero Day deftly takes the listener through the efforts of a small group of private cybersecurity experts who stumbled upon the virus and through dogged effort began to unravel its components to discover its true purpose. Wisely, the author reveals this piecemeal, mirroring the experiences of the cyber sleuths as they slowly crack the multidimensional virus. There are no big or juicy revelations here - anyone who has followed Iran's efforts to acquire nuclear weapons technology will have heard about Stuxnet and the alleged role the US and Israel played in it. Rather, Countdown intrigues in an All the President's Men sort of way - how intrepid doggedness on the part of ordinary people (substitute coders for reporter) can uncover the darkest and most hidden reaches of power.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Last 100 Days: The Tumultuous and Controversial Story of the Final Days of World War II in Europe

    • UNABRIDGED (27 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By John Toland
    • Narrated By Ralph Cosham
    Overall
    (45)
    Performance
    (42)
    Story
    (42)

    A dramatic countdown of the final months of World War II in Europe, The Last 100 Days brings to life the waning power and the ultimate submission of the Third Reich. To reconstruct the tumultuous hundred days between Yalta and the fall of Berlin, John Toland traveled more than 100,000 miles in twenty-one countries and interviewed more than six hundred people - from Hitler's personal chauffeur to Generals von Manteuffel, Wenck, and Heinrici.

    Kevin says: "Excellent book!"
    "Patchwork history - feels incomplete"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    Like Toland's other works, this is a good blend of military and political history and there are some nice details about how the final hundred days arguably set the tone and shape of international relations for the next 45 years. Nevertheless 100 days feels disjointed and somewhat incomplete as Toland overly dwells on certain events (e.g. Plans for the establishment of the U.N., the battle for Remagen, and especially Mussolini's demise) at the expense of seemingly equal or more pertinent ones (eg. The battle for Berlin, the German civil front). The end result feels patchwork with more than a few gaps.


    Would you recommend The Last 100 Days to your friends? Why or why not?

    May appeal to readers who like their history detailed and who aren't overly familiar with the closing days of the European theater of war.


    How did the narrator detract from the book?

    The Narrator was fine but the production was terrible, with frequent, inexplicable changes in tone and clarity. I thought at first this might be because the narrator was emphasizing a footnote before realizing it was just the sound production. In the end, the narration proved to be a distraction more than anything.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Mary Roach
    • Narrated By Emily Woo Zeller
    Overall
    (1477)
    Performance
    (1306)
    Story
    (1315)

    Best-selling author Mary Roach returns with a new adventure to the invisible realm we carry around inside. Roach takes us down the hatch on an unforgettable tour. The alimentary canal is classic Mary Roach terrain: The questions explored in Gulp are as taboo, in their way, as the cadavers in Stiff and every bit as surreal as the universe of zero gravity explored in Packing for Mars. Why is crunchy food so appealing? Why is it so hard to find words for flavors and smells? Why doesn’t the stomach digest itself? How much can you eat before your stomach bursts?

    Kirstin says: "Mary Roach Does Not Disappoint!"
    "Easily digestible fare"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    First off, I must admit to being a fan of Mary Roach, whose books delve into the eccentricities, trivialities, and the “have you ever wondered how” aspects of our human bodies. In this vein, Gulp dares the reader to boldly explore the splendor of what our bodies do to food from bite to bowel. Roach’s style isn’t to take any of this too seriously, or to drown the reader in arcane science; rather, she interviews experts in various fields or takes on the role of observer or occasional lab rat. All of this is infused with liberal amounts of tongue and cheek humor which is narrated in such a breezy, personal tone that I thought Roach herself was doing the narration. In the end, the reader won’t come away with anything close to encyclopedic understanding of human digestion but if that’s what you are looking for then Gulp is the wrong book for you anyway. Instead if you are looking to have a little info to go with your entertainment, and you don’t mind occasionally being a little grossed out (see the bit on tasters), Gulp may just leave you feeling a little awed by how your body works its unseen magic turning what you have eaten into what you are.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Hitler's Rockets: The Story of the V-2s

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Norman Longmate
    • Narrated By Steve West
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (14)
    Performance
    (14)
    Story
    (14)

    Britain was the first country to ever suffer a ballistic missile attack from beyond its borders. This book tells the story of that attack. During 1942 and 1943, confusing rumours circulated about the German development of a 'giant rocket'. Most experts, including Winston Churchill's own scientific adviser Lord Cherwell, declared that such a weapon was impossible. It was only after the patient sifting of European intelligence that the most influential doubters were convinced such a weapon was being built. Then on 8 September 1944, the first V-2 landed in Chiswick. Between then and the final rocket impact on 27 March 1945, more than a thousand landed on British soil, killing nearly three thousand people and seriously injuring more than six thousand.

    Mike says: "Excellent history of the V-2"
    "Lots of facts but sterile reading"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Was Hitler's Rockets worth the listening time?

    This history of Hitler’s V2 rocket program is a well-researched, fact-abundant chronology of mankind’s first guided ballistic missile. It deals primarily with the period of 1941-45 and the efforts of the Nazis to develop/use it as a terror weapon and the British attempts to monitor its development and then, once it began to rain down on British cities, minimize its impact on morale. In this, the book succeeds mostly through its preponderance of facts, including an almost missile by missile account of devastation and causalities, interspersed with eyewitness statements. Clearly, Longmate has done his homework and my eyes were opened to both the scale of its use as well as the utter helplessness of the British to defend against/cope with it. What is lacking here though is really any compelling narrative to draw the reader in – Longmate does not offer much in terms of either the technical challenges the German scientists faced in developing it or the British in defending against it or the personalities, motives, and conflicts of the key figures on either side. Rather, what you get is a somewhat sterile chronological recap of events with perhaps the first quarter of the book devoted almost exclusively to the development of the V2 and the last three quarters to its effects as a weapon. A more adept writer might have found a way to interweave the two storylines throughout the book in order to create a more continuous and less fragmented narrative. Still, for those who want to know more about this small bit of WWII history, Hitler’s Rockets will satisfy but likely not delight


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Psychopath Whisperer: The Science of Those Without Conscience

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Kent A. Kiehl
    • Narrated By Kevin Pariseau
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (87)
    Performance
    (80)
    Story
    (79)

    We know of psychopaths from chilling headlines and stories in the news and movies - from Ted Bundy and John Wayne Gacy to Hannibal Lecter and Dexter Morgan. As Dr. Kent Kiehl shows, psychopaths can be identified by a checklist of symptoms that includes pathological lying; lack of empathy, guilt, and remorse; grandiose sense of self-worth; manipulation; and failure to accept one’s actions. But why do psychopaths behave the way they do? Is it the result of their environment - how they were raised - or is there a genetic component to their lack of conscience?

    DORIS H. says: "An autobiography with splatter of neuropsychology."
    "Ev'thing you wanted to know but were afraid to ask"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about this story?

    This book is a mostly entertaining, first hand account of Kiehl’s professional experiences studying criminal psychopaths. It is informative without getting too technical (though there is a heavy focus on Kiehl’s brain imagining work) and the listener will come away with both a sense of who/what constitutes a psychopath as well as the somewhat unsettling notion that there are still more unknowns than knowns about its causes and treatments. Kiehl relates all this in a breezy, informal narrative that includes many fascinating case studies of youth and adults he has worked with over several decades. The title is probably misleading – Kiehl makes no claims to having any great gifts or abilities to relate to psychopaths but what the book does admirably is to shed light on the many falsehoods, misconceptions, and unknowns we have about this (thankfully) small sub-set of humankind. The narration is good in conveying Kielh as the “kind of guy you would like to go out with for a beer” while also subtly reminding the listener that these are real people we are hearing about. My only complaint is that the narrative occasionally diverges too much from the topic or digresses into detailed tangents (e.g. the procuring of various MRI machines) that could have either been edited down or out. Still, as long as you are neither scared off or repulsed by the topic, TPW is worth a read.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Dread: How Fear and Fantasy Have Fueled Epidemics from the Black Death to Avian Flu

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Phillip Alcabes
    • Narrated By Simon Prebble
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (15)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (8)

    The average individual is far more likely to die in a car accident than from a communicable disease...yet we are still much more fearful of the epidemic. Even at our most level-headed, the thought of an epidemic can inspire terror. As Philip Alcabes persuasively argues in Dread, our anxieties about epidemics are created not so much by the germ or microbe in question - or the actual risks of contagion - but by the unknown, the undesirable, and the misunderstood.

    Scott says: "Informative but dull"
    "Informative but dull"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    There are aspects to this audiobook that are much to like. It ably recaps mankind’s fear of and responses to outbreaks of disease and illness along a historical timeline in a sort of Epidemiology 101 primer way. In this respect it is informative without being trivial and will interest listeners with little or no understanding of the topic. In using an expansive definition of “epidemic” to include conditions which arguably are neither illnesses nor necessarily transmittable (e.g. autism, obesity), the author is able to focus more on mankind’s social response to perceived causes and “cures” rather than disease pathology. In this regard, Dread can intrigue by tracing how little our thinking has evolved over the centuries in our need to 1) find a cause for each epidemic and 2) equate that cause with an ethnic, religious, behavioural, or other scapegoat to both fear and blame. Still, I found it difficult to really get into this book. Despite the intriguing title, the writing style is dry and academic, akin to reading a textbook and the professorial tone of the narration brought me back to some of my worst experiences as a University freshman. In the end, this book may be better suited to skimming rather than listening to from start to finish.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • De Niro: A Life

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Shawn Levy
    • Narrated By Mark Deakins
    Overall
    (13)
    Performance
    (13)
    Story
    (11)

    In this elegant and compelling biography, best-selling writer Shawn Levy writes of these many De Niros - the characters and the man - seeking to understand the evolution of an actor who once dove deeply into his roles as if to hide his inner nature, and who now seemingly avoids acting challenges, taking roles which make few apparent demands on his overwhelming talent.

    Scott says: "As meticulous as its subject"
    "As meticulous as its subject"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    This is an exhaustive and thoughtful portrait of perhaps the greatest American actor of the latter 20th century. De Niro primarily focuses on the actor and his works moreso than the man, which given Robert De Niro's well-known reticence toward the media and interviews shouldn’t come as a surprise. Nevertheless, Levy has authoritatively researched his subject and seems to have gathered every possible quotable snippet RD has put on the record. What I particularly enjoyed about this bio was its critical take on its subject: Levy is not afraid to interpose his views in a balanced way on the actor's work as well as draw on other critics appraisals which makes this neither fawning nor a hatchet job. The end result is a bio that reveals the man primarily through his work, going in depth on his most iconic pictures and roles as well as collaborations with directors such as de Palma and Scorsese. In all, I found this very enjoyable, almost a companion to be read while either watching or reflecting on RDs movies. To this end, De Niro will appeal to film buffs as well those who want to understand the man in relation to the icon rather than those looking for a trashy tabloid take (though RD’s relationship with his artist father, his many spouses, children, and business enterprises are not glossed over). The breezy narration does not distract you from the material to the point I forgot I was listening to an audiobook. Well worth the read.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Billy Joel

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Fred Schruers
    • Narrated By Kirk Thornton
    Overall
    (11)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    In Billy Joel, acclaimed music journalist Fred Schruers draws upon more than 100 hours of exclusive interviews with Joel to present an unprecedented look at the life, career, and legacy of the pint-sized kid from Long Island who became a rock icon.Exhibiting unparalleled intimate knowledge, Schruers chronicles Joel’s rise to the top of the charts, from his working-class origins in Levittown and early days spent in boxing rings and sweaty clubs to his monumental success in the '70s and '80s.

    Scott says: "Fawning but likeable bio"
    "Fawning but likeable bio"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about Billy Joel? What did you like least?

    This bio has much to love and hate, which seems to mirror the often dichotomous opinion people (or music critics) have of the Piano Man. Schruers covers all the bases of Joel's life from his ancestors hegira from Nazi Germany, to his early days on Long Island, through pop stardom and later touring years. As might be expected from Schruers somewhat abbreviated treatment, each episode is covered in an almost cursory way with little time for in depth exploration of Joel's musical influences, cultural context, or critical interpretation. The hits, loves, tribulations, drug and alcohol abuse just breeze by and readers hoping for critical analysis or even behind the scenes details may come away disappointed. Nevertheless, Billy Joel has its pluses. Schruers notes in his sources the hundred+ hours of interviews and access Joel gave him; add to this the interviews with others in Joel's entourage plus voluminous research and what you get is a book that brims with quotes for every occasion that often illuminates Joel's personality and humor. But therein also lies the problem. One gets the sense that this is less a biography than ghostwritten autobiography and Schruers' access may have come at the price of a reluctance to delve with any depth or criticism into the darker aspects of Joel's life. The end result is a sympathetic, almost fawning bio that will neither offend nor illuminate but should appeal to those interested in a quick, breezy read and whose curiosity about the Piano Man would be satisfied with a Joel on Joel treatment.


    What about Kirk Thornton’s performance did you like?

    I quite enjoyed the narration, particularly Thornton's stabs at imitating Elton John, Keith Richards and other musicians. That aside, the narration is jaunty and befits the material.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Neil deGrasse Tyson
    • Narrated By Dion Graham
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2028)
    Performance
    (1205)
    Story
    (1210)

    Neil deGrasse Tyson has a talent for guiding readers through the mysteries of outer space with stunning clarity and almost childlike enthusiasm. This collection of his essays from Natural History magazine explores a myriad of cosmic topics. Tyson introduces us to the physics of black holes by explaining what would happen to our bodies if we fell into one; he also examines the needless friction between science and religion, and notes Earth's status as "an insignificantly small speck in the cosmos".

    Lind says: "Well written and well read"
    "Accessible and fun"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about Death by Black Hole?

    For those with a layperson’s interest in physics, Death by Black Hole is an entertaining and informative read. Tyson is a respected Astrophysicist and media personality, most recently recognizable as the host of the re-booted mini-series Cosmos. Those familiar with him will recognize in DBBH a few pet themes that underlie his works: first, that there is beauty, structure, and grandeur in the visible and invisible universe and secondly, that humanity’s best mechanism for understanding and explaining these lie in the application of the scientific method of inquiry. Having said that, DBBH is essentially an anthology of self-contained essays grouped by various themes, ranging from the foundations of knowledge and science, the biological and evolutionary origins of life, to the physical laws and structure of our visible and invisible universe. If this sounds heavy handed (it isn’t), Tyson also playfully diverges into explanations of how popular sci-fi movies get the science wrong, the multiple ways the universe is trying and failing to kill the collective us, and why so many of our commonly held axioms (“the sun always rises in the east”) are not quite correct. In lesser hands, this could come across as boorish but Tyson has a knack for infusing it with a tongue and cheek, sometimes self-deprecating, humor (as the title implies) that makes the material accessible while never condescending to the reader. As for the narration, I admit to being surprised after listening to the audiobook when I discovered that Tyson himself didn’t narrate it; hats off to Dion Graham for a lively reading and bang on impersonation. While DBBH would never be mistaken for a high school physics text, or even a mass market but more serious take such as Stephen Hawking’s “A Brief History of Time”, I highly recommend this audiobook, particularly for younger (or young at heart) readers who want to learn more about, to quote Douglas Adams, “life, the universe, and everything”.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.