You no longer follow Roland

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Roland

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Roland

ratings
41
REVIEWS
4
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
7

  • Storm Surge: Destroyermen, Book 8

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Taylor Anderson
    • Narrated By William Dufris
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (568)
    Performance
    (531)
    Story
    (528)

    In the Pacific, as USS Walker is repaired and updated after a previous battle and Reddy is healing from his wounds, planning begins for a bold raid on the very heart of the Grik Empire. But time is running out for the Alliance army in India, and the Allied forces in the west must gather in an unprecedented land, air, and sea campaign to destroy the mighty Grik battle fleet and break through to their relief. All other plans go on hold when the attempt proves more difficult - and more heartbreakingly costly - than anyone imagined.

    Greg says: "Long in tooth..."
    "Endless, endless, endless series"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    This series was like climbing a tree. One starts on a solid trunk of a story line, then encounters a few interesting side branches, but you are still firmly attached to the trunk. As the books continue, the reader finds himself in a tangle of increasingly tiny, parallell story branches, the plot line lost. This last book reads as an English assignment: "write a 5,000 word essay on....".


    Has Storm Surge turned you off from other books in this genre?

    Yeah. Many authors that develop a lot of interesting characters, and perhaps have a contractual obligation to their publishers, end up ruining a good story by dragging it out.


    What does William Dufris bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    He has excellent voice characterization, but after the first 3 or 4 books, even he can't keep up with the increasing senseless complexity.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • To the Gates of Richmond: The Peninsula Campaign

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Stephen Sears
    • Narrated By Nelson Runger
    Overall
    (10)
    Performance
    (10)
    Story
    (10)

    It was the largest campaign ever attempted in the Civil War: the Peninsula campaign of 1862. General George McClellan planned to advance from Yorktown up the Virginia Peninsula and destroy the Rebel army in its own capital. But with Robert E. Lee delivering blows to the Union army, McClellan’s plan fell through at the gates of Richmond.

    Roland says: "One of the best"
    "One of the best"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    The way author brings the individuals involved to life, so that the outcomes are seen as uncertain, always influenced by character and small decisions that turn entire battles. The author describes geography well enough so that a lack of visual aids (maps) is not crippling to the listen. The book also beautifully ties together single events to the broad flow of the unfolding war; like the confrontation by the ironclads Monitor and Virginia threatening the entire campaign at it's beginning.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Author is able to bring to life the personalities of the various commanders. For example, the amateur thespian, Confederate Gen. Jeb Macgruder is able to delay the approach of the ever-cautious McClellan, by staging small groups of soldiers with lots of flags and drums marching back and forth between the James and York Rivers just barely in view of the enemy, convincing McClellan and his dysfunctional intelligence chief, Allen Pinkerton (Pinkerton detective Agency), that an enormous Confederate Army was maneuvering just out of sight, preparing to pounce on the Federals. In fact, Macgruder commanded about 5,000 men to McClellan's 90,000. Macgruder succeeded in stalling (almost entirely by ruse and display) the Federal advance nearly 3 months, long enough to permit Confederate Gen. Johnston to gather a sizable force to defend Richmond. I found myself compelled to go visit some of the battlegrounds around Richmond, and see the terrain in a new light. It's made me want to know more of the politics of the Federals and Lincoln's White House in particular.


    What does Nelson Runger bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Solid narration without either theatrics or boredom.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

    Fool's errand: McClellan's Grand Army of the Potomac


    Any additional comments?

    At the end of the book, the author begins naming battle forces by their commander's name, expecting the reader to know them as Union or Confederate; this is a bit of a strain on the listener.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Gulliver's Travels: A Signature Performance by David Hyde Pierce

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Jonathan Swift
    • Narrated By David Hyde Pierce
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (638)
    Performance
    (450)
    Story
    (454)

    A Signature Performance: Four-time Emmy Award winner David Hyde Pierce delivers an air of lovable self-importance in his rendition of the classic social satire that remains as fresh today as the day it was published.

    Rose says: "Loved every minute"
    "Good listen, try it!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you listen to Gulliver's Travels: A Signature Performance by David Hyde Pierce again? Why?

    Yes! It's a fresh view of an otherwise difficult read. I've found that listening to books written before 1900 has made the stories come alive. English language prose from about 1700-1900 is often formal and very wordy to modern readers; it generally puts me off. The written form of Gulliver's Travels is especially like that. Jonathon Swift's phonetic spelling of foreign names and places reads awful. His overly polite and courtly speech is tiresome in print; it always bogged me down so that I missed the thrust of the story.
    Ah, but spoken by Mr. Pierce the book comes alive. It is easy to hear the subtle sarcasm buried in the superficial formalities, to appreciate the satire embedded in nearly unpronounceable (but not to the narrator) names.The rendition becomes a delight to listen to and to remember. At work, I often see the same Swift characters, behaving the same way.


    Which character – as performed by David Hyde Pierce – was your favorite?

    Why, Gulliver himself. How could one forget the scene in Lilliput (inhabitants very small but very self important) where the towering giant Gulliver, suddenly awakened from his night's sleep, strides over the town to pluck the queen trapped in her burning palace, then saves the palace from certain destruction by the only means available, pissing on the fire....the only water available....then enduring the rage and enmity of the queen, who orders the palace torn down and Gulliver's death to pay for such an outrageous act. Why wasn't this scene in the Disney version? Recanting this still makes me laugh out loud.


    Any additional comments?

    Do yourself a favor, try LISTENING to Treasure Island, Huckleberry Finn, any Washington Irving stories, Jack London stories; you'll be amazed by how good they are.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Into the Storm: Destroyermen, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Taylor Anderson
    • Narrated By William Dufris
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2257)
    Performance
    (1463)
    Story
    (1466)

    Pressed into service when World War II breaks out in the Pacific, the USS Walker---a Great-War vintage "four-stacker" destroyer---finds itself in full retreat from pursuit by Japanese battleships. Its captain, Lieutenant Commander Matthew Patrick Reddy, knows that he and his crew are in dire straits. In desperation, he heads Walker into a squall, hoping it will give them cover---and emerges somewhere else.

    AudioAddict says: "The cover is a little misleading"
    "Can't stop listening"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about Into the Storm?

    a surprisingly well-written sci-fi, alternative history sort of story. It's the author's knowledge of the workings of an old destroyer and it's crew that fleshes this story out and makes it so compelling to listen to. Well read, too.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Capt of the Walker (commander of the destroyer), and the flexible Chaq, but hey, listen for yourself. It's kinda a boy story, being military and all, but it's a good one. One that would not disappoint on a long car trip.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.