You no longer follow Robyn

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Robyn

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Robyn

ratings
66
REVIEWS
66
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
4
HELPFUL VOTES
41

  • John Wayne Gacy: Defending a Monster

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Sam L. Amirante, Danny Broderick
    • Narrated By Robin Bloodworth
    Overall
    (108)
    Performance
    (101)
    Story
    (106)

    “Sam, could you do me a favor?” Thus begins a story that has now become part of America's true-crime hall of fame. It is a gory, grotesque tale befitting a Stephen King novel. It is also a David and Goliath saga - the story of a young lawyer fresh from the public defender's office whose first client in private practice turns out to be the worst serial killer in our nation's history. This is a gripping true crime narrative that reenacts the gruesome killings and the famous trial that shocked a nation.

    Douglas says: "After Having Read Many Books On Serial Killers..."
    "a book for legal practitioners"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book is probably more interesting for Law students and practitioners than for true crime aficionados. I understand why the authors belabor the point about everyone, no matter how appalling the crime/s, having the right to a fair trial. Clearly a large section of the public was hostile to the idea of the apparently indefensible being defended - but the repetition of the point leaves the book sounding as though the authors' reason for writing it is self-justification and little more. Overall the book gets a higher rating that it might otherwise because of the outstanding narration by Robin Bloodworth - a truly 5-star performance.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold Story of English

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By John McWhorter
    • Narrated By John McWhorter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1286)
    Performance
    (998)
    Story
    (994)

    A survey of the quirks and quandaries of the English language, focusing on our strange and wonderful grammar. Why do we say "I am reading a catalog" instead of "I read a catalog"? Why do we say "do" at all? Is the way we speak a reflection of our cultural values? Delving into these provocative topics and more, Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue distills hundreds of years of fascinating lore into one lively history.

    Cookie says: "Oh the joy!"
    "A fun way to learn"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I can only endorse the positive comments below - this is a great read. It deals with a complex topic in a way that anyone can understand, and it is interesting from start to finish. I don't know how many languages McWhorter speaks fluently but it sounds as though he knows quite a few. He reels off words and phrases in foreign languages with apparent ease. He is probably the only narrator who could do justice to this book. His informal approach and conversational tone are perfect for engaging the listener and they contribute towards rendering this specialist topic accessible to all.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • William Wilberforce: A Hero for Humanity

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Kevin Belmonte
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (8)
    Performance
    (7)
    Story
    (7)

    William Wilberforce: A Hero for Humanity is the definitive biography of the English statesman who overcame incredible odds to bring about the end of slavery and slave trade. Called 'the wittiest man in England' by philosopher and novelist Madame de Stael, praised by Abraham Lincoln, and renowned for his oratorical genius, Wilberforce worked tirelessly to accomplish his goal. Whether you are an avid student of history, a pupil of prominent leaders of the past, or simply someone who reads for pleasure, you will love award-winning biographer Kevin Belmonte's vivid account....

    Robyn says: "Boring, boring"
    "Boring, boring"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I confess I stopped reading this book about half-way through the second half, and it was only in the hope that things would improve that I got that far. The early section on Wilberforce's childhood was quite good, but deteriorated with every chapter after that. The book may be interesting to students of Christian thought and philosophy but I think it's a book of interest only to the devout and non-Christians might best give it a miss. Fair enough that Christianity was the driving force in Wilberforce's life (after his conversion), but he did become something of a Bible-basher and Belmonte deals with Wilberforce's Christianity to the exclusion of nearly everything else. The big omission is Wilberforce's family life. I knew Wilberforce had children because their recollections of their father are dotted throughout from very early in the book, but how many children there were and how and when they arrived in the world isn't covered. The first I heard of Wilberforce's wife was a mere peripheral mention. Who she was and what she was like, their courtship (if there was one), their marriage and the birth of their children didn't rate so much as a sentence. What's more, the book is not well written. Its main fault is jumping around chronologically so you're often not sure where you are or whether your mind wandered and you and missed a chapter. Simon Vance does a sterling job of narration. He is to be applauded for sticking with it to the end.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Mistakes Were Made (But Not By Me): Why We Justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions and Hurtful Acts

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Carol Tavris, Elliot Aronson
    • Narrated By Marsha Mercant, Joe Barrett
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (598)
    Performance
    (416)
    Story
    (418)

    Why do people dodge responsibility when things fall apart? Why the parade of public figures unable to own up when they screw up? Why the endless marital quarrels over who is right? Why can we see hypocrisy in others but not in ourselves? Are we all liars? Or do we really believe the stories we tell? Backed by years of research and delivered in lively, energetic prose, Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me) offers a fascinating explanation of self-deception.

    Andrew says: "Insightful study of human behavior"
    "Basic Psychology (and how it applies to you)"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book explains cognitive dissonance and the related concept of self-justification. The research underpinning these theories is presented, with case examples which range from big political decisions which start wars to interpersonal conflicts which all of us deal with in our everyday lives. The easy and seductive part of the book is fitting the theories to the behaviour of people we know - it explains a lot. The tricky part is to keep reminding yourself that it is equally applicable to your own behaviour and may also explain a lot about you. With any luck it will help people to recognise their own mistakes and avoid making similar mistakes in future. Even if it doesn't change your life or improve your relationships, it's an interesting read and an easy way to learn some basic Psychology. Marsha Mercant has a very pleasant voice and does a very good job as narrator.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Twelve Angry Men

    • ORIGINAL (1 hr and 50 mins)
    • By Reginald Rose
    • Narrated By Dan Castellaneta, Hector Elizondo, Armin Shimerman
    Overall
    (766)
    Performance
    (701)
    Story
    (695)

    Over the course of a steamy and tense afternoon, 12 jurors deliberate the fate of a 19-year-old boy alleged to have murdered his own father. A seemingly open and shut case turns complicated, igniting passions and hidden prejudices.

    Emily says: "Excellent court room drama"
    "Five-star performance of a five-star play"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a story which everyone should know, and this presentation is as good as any I've seen. The quality of the script is well known, and these actors do justice to every word. It's a gripping few hours and it is no less relevant today than when it was written. The insights into human nature and the justice system can teach us all lessons about our prejudices and priorities and our relationships with others, and the way society works and often fails individuals. Excellent in every way.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • No One Would Listen: A True Financial Thriller

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs)
    • By Harry Markopolos
    • Narrated By Scott Brick, Harry Markopolos, Frank Casey, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1437)
    Performance
    (737)
    Story
    (734)

    No One Would Listen is the exclusive story of the Harry Markopolos-lead investigation into Bernie Madoff and his $65 billion Ponzi scheme. While a lot has been written about Madoff's scam, few actually know how Markopolos and his team - affectionately called "the Fox Hounds" by Markopolos himself - uncovered what Madoff was doing years before this financial disaster reached its pinnacle. Unfortunately, no one listened, until the damage of the world's largest financial fraud ever was irreversible.

    Brendan says: "Shocking, terrific"
    "True crime, and a true hero"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a must-read book. Even if you are totally financially illiterate, you will still be able to understand the twists and turns of financial management reported in this book. It is a corporate crime thriller, with one man, Harry Markopolos, and his associates doggedly amassing evidence of the biggest swindle in modern history and repeatedly failing to get action from anyone in a position to do something about it. Early in the book I wondered whether Harry Markopolos was simply blowing his own trumpet - could anyone be so principled and dedicated and sacrifice so much of his life (and eventually his salary) for the good of others and the integrity of the system in which he worked? I looked him up elsewhere and, sure enough, he is a true hero. I kept reading, glued to the story and full of admiration for Harry. A great read from start to finish.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Liberty

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Garrison Keillor
    • Narrated By Garrison Keillor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (318)
    Performance
    (175)
    Story
    (177)

    Lake Wobegon is in a frenzy of preparations for the Fourth of July. The town is dizzy with anticipation - until they hear of Clint's ambition to run for Congress. They know about his episodes with vodka sours, his rocky marriage, and his friendship with the 24-year-old who dresses up as the Statue of Liberty for the parade and may be buck naked beneath her robes. In Keillor's words, "It is Lake Wobegon as you imagined it - good loving people who drive each other crazy."

    Christopher says: "Great for a long country drive."
    "Loved it all!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Unlike some other readers, I couldn't fault this book. It had well-drawn true-to-life characters, biting observations, funny and sad episodes, life crises, home-spun philosophy, strong narrative thread to connect the characters, and the added bonus of GK singing - the songs fit perfectly into the story and are interesting in themselves and really add to the presentation by bringing in another medium of communication. I loved it all - thank you GK.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Pontoon: A Novel of Lake Wobegon

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Garrison Keillor
    • Narrated By Garrison Keillor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (814)
    Performance
    (539)
    Story
    (542)

    Garrison Keillor's latest book is about the wedding of a girl named Dede Ingebretson, who comes home from California with a guy named Brent. Dede has made a fortune in veterinary aromatherapy; Brent bears a strong resemblance to a man wanted for extortion who's pictured on a poster in the town's post office. Then there's the memorial service for Dede's aunt Evelyn, who led a footloose and adventurous life after the death of her husband 17 years previously.

    A User says: "Brillliant but not lighthearted"
    "An examination of human nature"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This was my first GK book and it was a very pleasant suprise. GK's rambling style is unique, his characters totally believable and in many cases recognisable as someone we know (even ourselves), and his observations about life and death and human nature are astute, often amusing and often acerbic. Nobody could read it better than GK, he is simply perfect. I must confess the farcical episode on the lake at the end was way to hammed-up for my sense of humour, but GK gets to the heart of what matters in ourselves and others by being a master of observation and, of course, a master of writing. I thoroughly enjoyed the book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Fab: The Intimate Life of Paul McCartney

    • UNABRIDGED (25 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Howard Sounes
    • Narrated By David Thorpe
    Overall
    (22)
    Performance
    (22)
    Story
    (21)

    The living embodiment of the Beatles, a musical juggernaut without parallel, Paul McCartney is undoubtedly the senior figure in pop music today. In this authoritative biography, journalist and acclaimed author Howard Sounes leaves no stone unturned in building the most accurate and extensive profile yet of music's greatest living legend. He is one of the biggest stars that has ever existed, the only key member left from the unquestioned 'biggest band of all time'.

    Amazon Customer says: "Quite Long But Good.."
    "fascinating biography"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As a follower of the Beatles since the 1960s I really enjoyed this biography of Paul. Howard Sounes' detailed research is impressive, and I learned a lot about Paul the man, his relationships with the other Beatles, with family and friends and with other musos. The early days centred on sex drugs and rock'n'roll which became a little tedious, but once Linda arrived on the scene the focus changed and a mature and more interesting Paul emerged. Naturally the length of the book means a lot of characters and a lot of detail, but it held my interest from start to finish. I ended up seeing Paul as a decent and caring man and liking him for the person he is rather than liking his music and admiring him as a star. At the end I had just one question - why didn't Paul learn to write music? With so much musical apptitude and talent, his life might have been easier if he'd been able to jot down music as it came to him instead of waiting for a professional to do it for him. The book is well written, and David Thorpe does a great job of narration - right voice for the job and good with accents.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • A Town Like Alice

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Nevil Shute
    • Narrated By Robin Bailey
    Overall
    (1720)
    Performance
    (1150)
    Story
    (1159)

    Jean Paget is just twenty years old and working in Malaya when the Japanese invasion begins. When she is captured she joins a group of other European women and children whom the Japanese force to march for miles through the jungle. While on the march, the group run into some Australian prisoners, one of whom, Joe Harman, helps them steal some food, and is horrifically punished by the Japanese as a result.

    Amazon Customer says: "Better still in Audio form"
    "strong start, weak end"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I really enjoyed the first half of this book - the plot was interesting and moved at a good pace, the characters were believable, there were some surprises with unexpected twists and turns, and I was keen to know what would happen next. But by the time the action moved to Australia it was all I could do to keep listening. The pace slowed, the plot was pedictable and not terribly convincing, a lot of the detail about cattle properties and outback towns was boring, and much of the format was reported speech which I found tedious. I thought that if I heard 'bonzer' or 'oh, my word' one more time I would scream. And couldn't someone have told Shute that there are crocodiles in Australia but no aligators! I know this is a novel of its time and one must accept the racism and sexism as part of society in the 1950s, but referring to Aboriginal people as 'boongs', 'gins', 'lubras' and 'abos' is so totally unacceptable nowadays that it grated every time I heard the words and it detracted considerably from my enjoyment of the book.

    Robin Bailey is a first class narrator - his ordinary reading voice and accent are perfect for this story and his accents and voices for different characters are good - except for the Australian accent which is commonly considered very difficult to imitate and Bailey's attempt is yet more proof of the veracity of this observation.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.