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Reginald

BRATTLEBORO, VT, United States | Listener Since 2009

5
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 1 reviews
  • 17 ratings
  • 126 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
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  • Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American West

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Dee Brown
    • Narrated By Grover Gardner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (497)
    Performance
    (363)
    Story
    (366)

    Dee Brown's eloquent, meticulously documented account of the systematic destruction of the American Indian during the second half of the 19th century uses council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions. Brown allows great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes to tell us in their own words of the battles, massacres, and broken treaties that finally left them demoralized and defeated.

    Reginald says: "A wrenching introduction to this history."
    "A wrenching introduction to this history."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you consider the audio edition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee to be better than the print version?

    Having never read the print version, I couldn't say.


    How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

    I wouldn't change anything.


    What does Grover Gardner bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    It's a compassionate and sympathetic reading. Like all audiobooks it can really express that 3rd or 1st person narrative in a way that reading print does not. There's less projection of the reader into the text.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I did not have an extreme reaction.


    Any additional comments?

    If a person is unfamiliar with the history of Native Americans and their relationship with the first generations of European settlers, this book is an absolute must-read. It is a history of peoples and societies utterly rent from lands lived upon for thousands of years, by a wholly alien invasion. It is sympathetic to aboriginal Americans, but certainly not unfair to the Europeans whose ingress unto the American continent meant the end of an epoch.



    Those familiar with the history of Native American and early Europeans may find this book dated, and overly simplistic. Much progress has been made in telling the story of Native Americans since Brown published this book in 1970, but this criticism is really the ultimate compliment to an author and book that set a standard for examining US history with deep scrutiny, while challenging readers and fellow historians to dig deeper. In subsequent years, the body of literature about these topics has expanded exponentially and some of Browns most controversial theses are now accepted wildly, if not universally, but those who engage regularly with the problem of US History.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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