Call anytime(888) 283-5051
 

You no longer follow Prsilla

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Prsilla

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Prsilla

Retired to South Lake Tahoe, CA. Sell on eBay as Prsilla. No TV. Volunteer in wildlife rehab. Knit, sew or embroider while listening.

Member Since 2007

ratings
126
REVIEWS
90
FOLLOWING
5
FOLLOWERS
39
HELPFUL VOTES
320

  • The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Carlos Castaneda
    • Narrated By Luis Moreno
    Overall
    (200)
    Performance
    (155)
    Story
    (151)

    For over 40 years, Carlos Castaneda’s The Teachings of Don Juan has inspired audiences to expand their world view beyond traditional Western forms. Originally published as Castaneda’s master’s thesis in anthropology, Teachings documents Castaneda’s supposed apprenticeship with a Yaqui Indian sorcerer, don Juan Matus. Dividing the work into two sections, Castaneda begins by describing don Juan’s philosophies, then continues with his own reflections.

    LarryNC says: "The Teachings of Don Juan"
    "BORING, INFLATED SCHOLARSHIP, PROBABLY FICTION"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    THIS BOOK IS A TERRIBLE LISTEN! Save your credit unless you are intensely interested in this stuff! I will quote a critic of Castenada from the Wikipedia article:

    In The Power and the Allegory, De Mille compared The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge with Castaneda's library stack requests at the University of California. The stack requests documented that he was sitting in the library when allegedly his journal said he was squatting in Don Juan's hut. One discovery that de Mille alleges to have made in his examination of the stack requests was that when Castaneda was alleged to have said that he was participating in the traditional peyote ceremony – (the least fantastic of many episodes of drug use that Castaneda described in his books) – he was sitting in the UCLA library and he was reading someone else's description of their experience of the peyote ceremony. Other criticisms of Castaneda's work include the total lack of Yaqui vocabulary or terms for any of his experiences.[15]

    _______________________

    [This is the third New Age author I have read that I now believe to be completely phoney. The others are Tuesday Lobsang Rampa, an alleged Tibrtan monk who was actually an old Englishman; and Lyn V. Andrews who thinks you can sweep a cabin floor and create a beautiful and powerful medicine bag from the beads and trinkets in the sweepings! Alas, I bit and read all their books!]

    In the first two-thirds of this book, a young man spends time with an old shaman who guides him through elaborate ceremonies to prepare and use peyote and then jimson weed to achieve other realities. In this part of the book, Casteneda removes all his clothes, plays with a dog while high, rubs substances on himself, travels, flies and does terrible things to lizards.

    In the last one-third of the book, Castaneda categorizes and generalizes and philosophizes about the hallucinogenic experiences with his teacher. He uses big words and high-flown concepts to dignify it in such a way that his professors were impressed . . . for a few years, at least. THIS BOOK IS THE AUTHOR'S SCHOLARLY THESIS! It was never intended to be popular reading. Get it, folks, this is graduate-level crapola! On the other hand, this may be a valuable anthropological record of shamanic practice and philosophy. But there are many more helpful books today telling how to meditate, how to travel and see things without ingesting hallucinogens, and how to get answers for living. Try Sondra Ray, Louise Hay or my favorite, Stuart Wilde.

    Castaneda was very bright and a good writer. I have no respect for his truthfulness nor his spiritual attainments. He died at 72 of cancer. In his later years, he surrounded himself with women. Some of them wrote books. Some of them disappeared soon after he died. The old guy must've been magnetically charming. Total ego trip!

    THIS WAS A TOUR DE FORCE FOR THE NARRATOR, LUIS MORENO. Obviously both he and the author are completely bilingual. Luis moves into lovely Spanish when called for. In the complex and boring last third, he slows down to make clear the stacked clauses and complex sentence structure. This material might as well have been the Martinez listings of the San Francisco phone book! Bravo, Luis!

    The special afterword written in 1998 on the 30th anniversary of this book is interesting. If you spend your credit on this and get bored, skip to the last 45 minutes.

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • The Diddakoi

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By Rumer Godden
    • Narrated By Lynda Bellingham
    Overall
    (7)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (5)

    Kizzy was a diddakoi, a half-gypsy, but the more the children at school tormented her, the more determined she was not to become one of ‘them’ - gorgios. And as long as she had her Gran, and Joe the old horse, she would be all right. But then Gran died and faithful old Joe was sent to the knackers - and Kizzy to the gorgios.Luckily, in the midst of all this misery and interference, there were some people who loved Kizzy as she was - and with them this lonely little outcast found a true home at last.

    Alifa says: "The Diddakoi"
    "A Sweet Book About Lifestyles, Horses, Respect"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am a Rumer Godden fan, and this book did not disappoint! The general plot is classic: a misfit kid that nobody really understands or wants, do-gooders, "social services," prejudice and preconceived notions of the good life and how kids should be brought up. The little girl is a gypsy in England many years ago. Gypsies continue to challenge people all over the world! In Spain they beg pitifully, whining on the subway stairs, holding a sedated half-grown "baby" in their lap. I have heard of kidnapping and medical imprisonment of an adult in Northern California where the alleged gypsy perps have obscure foreign names, light skin and impressive credentials. Pretty scarey! In this story, it would be easy to judge the "nice" people who try to take charge of the child without contaminating their own lives. I enjoyed learning some of the different attitudes of the gypsies -- cleanliness rules akin to keeping kosher! This would be great family listening, maybe on a road trip. There's a little girl whose precious grandmother has died, rough and disgusting relatives who steal the treasures and burn the grandma's caravan, a rich and handsome Englishman, a dear old horse named Joe, way too many new clothes, nice people at the school, and one brave young woman who actually has an extra bedroom and agrees to give the child a home. And a delicious slowly-emerging romance that will take care of everything for this little girl. In the listen, we learn that men can indeed cook and clean very well -- and not to pour gasoline on a fire. Also that brown people aren't dirty -- a loving God made them that way and it won't wash off! -- and differences are just that, differences, not better or worse. But Rumer Godden doesn't preach; she didn't say all that; I did. Rumer Godden wrote a very nice book. Enjoy!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Brimstone Wedding

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Barbara Vine
    • Narrated By Juliet Stevenson
    Overall
    (54)
    Performance
    (29)
    Story
    (29)

    Unlike the other residents of Middleton Hall, Stella is elegant, smart and in control. Only Jenny, her care assistant, knows that she harbours a painful secret, and only she can prevent Stella from carrying it to the grave. As the women talk, Jenny pieces together the answers to many questions that arise: Why has she kept possession of a house that her family don’t know about? What happened there that holds the key to a distant tragedy?

    N. says: "Stevenson + Vine/Rendell = good audiobook"
    "Ruth Rendell and Juliet Stevenson . . . Wonderful!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book written by a master and read by a master narrator is to be savored a bite at a time like a box of chocolates -- or gobbled whole overnight! I didn't gobble it whole; however I stayed with the last several hours and was left in a real funk! The story is about a sweet old lady who is only in her early 70's but is dying of cancer. Her care-giver in a pricey nursing home thinks the old lady is interesting. A real love and care grows between them. There are plot details that would be missed by listeners who "gobble"! The medical details are minimal. Both women have been married and had a lover on the side. Their stories are inter-twined with no confusion between the two. The listener cares about both -- with Genevieve's (the care-giver) story progressing in real time and Stella's (the old lady) told in flashbacks and on cassette after she is gone. This is a true horror story! Ruth Rendell is clever and subtle and quite delicious!

    Juliet Stevenson is superb narrating Jane Austen. In this story she gets to holler and talk like some unkempt hausfrau in a dirty housecoat. She's an actress! I appreciate the silences after some shocking fact is revealed and between sections. At first Genny sounds like real disadvantaged trash. As the story progresses, we learn that she looks up words and studies classical music and art (to impress the cultured lover) and as she reaches to improve her knowledge, her voice softens. She takes on some of the fastidious "great lady" qualities of her patient, Stella, even as we learn that Stella was considered and treated as "a little nothing" in her own prime!

    I feel like I know these people. Right away I sent for a reading copy of the book to go to my elderly English friend, Anne, living in Alabama. (She gobbles!) This is a book to set aside as a real treat on a long weekend or New Year's Eve when you don't have a date. Enjoy!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Known World

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Edward P. Jones
    • Narrated By Kevin Free
    Overall
    (476)
    Performance
    (95)
    Story
    (90)

    Henry Townsend, a black farmer, bootmaker, and former slave, has a fondness for Paradise Lost and an unusual mentor, William Robbins, perhaps the most powerful white man in antebellum Virginia's Manchester County. Under Robbins's tutelage, Henry becomes proprietor of his own plantation, as well as of his own slaves. When he dies, his widow Caldonia succumbs to profound grief, and things begin to fall apart.

    Rachel says: "wonderful and highly recommended"
    "Challenging but Most Worthwhile!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Some people had a hard time with this author jumping back and forth in time, linking up all the people. I did at first, thinking, Oh, gosh, now who is this? And what color are these people? And what relationship? There are long scenes in which you simply follow one character. When I found myself not paying enough attention, I just backed up or moved to a different activity for awhile. I have only listened once -- with several back-ups! I want to get the print book. I found Edward P. Jones through the recent marketing trick in which authors told about their own favorite authors. I sifted and took notes, and came out with paydirt like this! I am pursuing African-American authors for new personal reasons. I called the suicide hotline one night recently and a man answered. I told him, "I'm going through something absolutely outrageous and it reminds me of what black people have put up with for a long time and while I'm white, if you're black, I think you can really help me!" A man's soft voice answered, "I am black." I wanted to know how black people cope, how they get up in the morning and feel hopeful. How they deal in their own interior lives with hoo-rah and nonsense coming from unworthy people who nonetheless are in positions of power, people jerking us around in our immediate personal lives, little Nazis. The conversation we had was extremely helpful, freeing me to do the most healing and beneficial thing for myself because "we could come back in ten years and maybe nothing would have changed!" This seems to me at first like giving up. Then I realized I was going into tailspins trying to write letters and getting involved in situations not my own immediate business. Emotional energy is limited.So let's save it for the poetry, music, color.

    Actually, this book inspires me to do some writing, myself. Mr. Jones has a wonderful writing style, telling what a character was thinking about, who did what, who said what, but not many adjectives or even adverbs. When shocking things happen, they simply happen. This makes them more shocking. I have not read Hemingway in a while, but Mr. Jones is spare like Hemingway. And yet he pulls together a rich and colorful "known world". I see patterns of intense jealousy when some people show tremendous talent as well as good work ethic. Still happening! Strong women and weak women. Hierarchies based on energy, intelligence, inspiration -- and color. Men and women praying for all they are worth. The woman weeping as she milks the wonderful cow. The bride who is given a slave girl for a wedding gift and never actually frees her, despite saying she is against slavery! The good white man who had blackouts and might have lived longer except for a bad tooth. The ordinary house with a stairs that didn't creak and the woman living there who always had a tablecloth -- that came from intelligence, industry and refinement. I relished the way a few people got away to fresh vistas and to un-dreamed-of joy and fulfillment.

    I've sent for this author's two short story collections in print because I don't do so well listening to stories and I have a huge wish list anyway. I do hope this author is percolating another good book!

    I found Kevin Free a perfect narrator for this book and many others -- I have him neck and neck with Humphrey Bower, another favorite. He can do Irish and white gentlemen and low-life truly evil good ol'boys and sweet black people and uninspired black people. The reading is seamless. You forget he's reading. Great clarity, no mispronunciations. I had to google his name . . . oooh, dimples too! Thank Heaven we live in a time when talent and industry can be recognized, enjoyed and rewarded.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By William Davis
    • Narrated By Tom Weiner
    Overall
    (1814)
    Performance
    (1549)
    Story
    (1528)

    Since the introduction of dietary guidelines calling for reduced fat intake in the 1970s, a strange phenomenon has occurred: Americans have steadily, inexorably become heavier, less healthy, and more prone to diabetes than ever before. After putting more than two thousand of his at-risk patients on a wheat-free regimen and seeing extraordinary results, cardiologist William Davis has come to the disturbing conclusion that it is not fat, not sugar, not our sedentary lifestyle that is causing America’s obesity epidemic—it is wheat.

    Stacey says: "The program works, but the listen is technical"
    "LIFE-CHANGING TRUTH WE DESPERATELY NEED TO HEAR"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Yeah, I give 5 stars to fiction writers, too. I'm a doctor's daughter. In the 1940's Dad, an osteopath, survived terminal TB to begin his practice in Bakersfield, CA of dustbowl fame. He told his overweight patients to eat God's food. Our milk man brought certified raw milk to the front door. And I grew up (and later OUT) on Oroweat Honey Wheat Berry bread! Meanwhile, I was learning to follow recipes, first sifting the flour and leveling it in the measuring cup with a knife and to win blue ribbons at the county fair! Betty Crocker! And tonight I felt Dad was listening with me, telling me to pay attention because for sure the big boys have really done it now! However, Dr. Davis does point out that wheat was originally modified for greater yield, in hopes of feeding a hungry world. Greed has certainly taken over -- greed and stupidity and not really caring about people. I love this book! Thank you, Dr. Davis!

    Tom Weiner reads very well. I have no scientific background. I had to just sit and listen, almost holding my breath to take it all in, almost as though it were in a foreign language. And yet, Mr. Weiner makes the following as easy as possible. The book is also well written. I loved the story about the President of the Soupbone Club. My dad would comment, "Oh, he's a walk-off!" [It seems God was making people one afternoon and left some sitting on the fence to dry and their heads off a little way. When He came back next day, they had walked off. Without their heads.] I am already following Dr. D'Adamo's Blood Type Diet plan and as I work with wildlife and love animals, I am vegan or at least vegetarian. While listening, I realized I would have to turn on my oven and look around for recipes, ask questions at my health food store and try a lot harder to cook well for myself. Dr. Davis is loving. He says more than once that people are genuinely trying to follow food guidelines, but . . . and I for one don't FEEL like exercising! My love handles ache. I live in HUD housing and the Powers that Be bring us charity junk food. Well, I just put aside a lot of it to take back to the "free" table for someone who really needs it. . . . When I think of the decades of "good" breakfasts I had, getting up so early and not wanting to go to those jobs, slightly sickened by the wheat? Maybe so. Dr. Davis mentions several specific ailments I have already suffered. . . . I don't have precious little kids to feed, but I do have long-lived parents and grandparents, baby birds to go feed, good things yet to do. Thank you, Dr. Davis, for giving me hope. And for the PDF with great recipes. As the girl said, "Because I'm worth it!"

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Tess of the d'Urbervilles

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Thomas Hardy
    • Narrated By Mary Sarah
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (18)
    Performance
    (17)
    Story
    (18)

    The story of Tess Durbeyfield, a low-born country girl whose family find they have noble connections. In 2003, the novel was listed at number 26 on the BBC's survey The Big Read. Scandalous when first published in part because it challenged the sexual mores of Hardy’s day. One of the most important works of English literature. Brilliantly read by Mary Sarah Agliotta.

    Rosemary says: "Great novel, but read very quickly"
    "Maddening Bad Reading by Angliotta -- Can't Listen"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I've had this book for awhile and have already suffered with that Angliotta person trying to read Jane Austen. She rushes and swallows the last part of every important word. The neighbor's 7-year-old would do a better job.; Anyone at all would do a better job. I'm bailing for now and look forward to hearing Davina Porter do the work justice.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By Robert Olen Butler
    • Narrated By Robert Olen Butler
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (22)
    Performance
    (19)
    Story
    (19)

    Robert Olen Butler's lyrical and poignant collection of stories about the aftermath of the Vietnam War and its impact on the Vietnamese was acclaimed by critics across the nation and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1993. This edition includes two subsequently published stories - "Salem" and "Missing" - that brilliantly complete the collection's narrative journey with a return to the jungles of Vietnam.

    Prsilla says: "RARE AND WONDERFUL STORIES!"
    "RARE AND WONDERFUL STORIES!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The author, a white man who served in Vietnam, was the perfect person to read these wonderful stories. He pronounces everything properly and moves along in a comfortable way. I had recently listened to a novel about a stolen painting -- 32 hours of the main character being drunk or stoned. When the next day it won the Pullitzer Prize, I was ready to scream in the street! This book, however, is so deserving! This writing is so rich. Most of the stories are told from the viewpoint of a Vietnamese person,man or woman, elderly or younger, usually a Vietnamese who came to the U.S. -- usually Lake Charles, Louisiana -- to settle. Not all the stories are about war at all. Some are about family life, co-workers, romance, trying to fit the old teachings and ideals into the new American framework.

    I thought I already knew too much about Vietnam. I have a half-Vietnamese step-daughter who un-friended me on FaceBook, who got into serious drugs, whose daughter photographed her pregnant belly in the bathroom to show all of FaceBook, etc. etc. As the third wife, I listened to sickening stories of cutting down our tortured soldiers in the jungle, the naughty little lizard who uses the F-word. I've been screamed at by a Vietnamese-American boss one-third my age. . . . Americans tend to assume that brown people who don't understand English probably don't have much to say anyway. Butler shows how wrong this is as he paints the most subtle thoughts of his sweet and interesting characters.

    These stories call for more than one listen -- and not more than two stories at a sitting! They're pungent! And sometimes funny. Among my favorites was the sleepy girl at the restaurant and Mr. Cohen. I also loved the ending of the one about bringing grandpa home from the airport, how the family prepared a feast and was so excited to have this dear old man come to live with them after many years of separation. How could the husband offer some kind of healing to his wife? Listen and see! These stories are a treasure. Thank you, Mr. Butler!

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 33 mins)
    • By Anne Brontë
    • Narrated By Mary Sarah Agliotta
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (71)
    Performance
    (63)
    Story
    (62)

    Probably the most shocking of the Brontës' novels, this novel had an instant and phenomenal success and is widely considered to be one of the first sustained feminist novels. A mysterious widow, Mrs. Helen Graham, arrives at Wildfell Hall, a nearby old mansion. A source of curiosity for the small community, the reticent Helen and her young son Arthur are slowly drawn into the social circles of the village.

    julia says: "BRONTE CLASSIC"
    "CLASSIC NOVEL BOTCHED BY A WRETCHED NARRATOR!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Audible sort of, um, lost my first review. I know they got it because on Day 2 when I checked, they said it was being looked at. That was over a week ago. Now, the best they can do is tell me to rewrite it! Mary Sarah Whatzername is still a terrible reader who is still in a hurry and doesn't know how to pronounce paroxysm and a number of other good English words! I agree with the other reviewer who suggested this narrator had to "use the facilities" and they wouldn't let her out of the recording booth until she finished the book! It's two hours shorter than the other version I just finished listening to.

    So here you are, audible! I will give dear Anne Bronte's masterpiece a good review under the other version. In listening to that version with male and female narrators including Ms. Agutter, a number of new truths came out that I completely missed in Ms. Agliotta's breathy, hurried rendition. Every word is beautiful!

    This was $1.95 absolutely wasted!

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Misquoting Jesus

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Bart D. Ehrman
    • Narrated By Richard M. Davidson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1891)
    Performance
    (1082)
    Story
    (1084)

    When world-class biblical scholar Bart Ehrman first began to study the texts of the Bible in their original languages he was startled to discover the multitude of mistakes and intentional alterations that had been made by earlier translators. In Misquoting Jesus, Ehrman tells the story behind the mistakes and changes that ancient scribes made to the New Testament and shows the great impact they had upon the Bible we use today.

    R. J. Monts says: "a (mostly) balanced discussion"
    "HOW JESUS CAME TO SPEAK IN RED ENGLISH WORDS!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a serious book, well-narrated and a not difficult listen for regular lay-persons of any religious preference. The author is quite neutral, matter-of fact, though with a Protestant born-again background. You could sit there with your King James on your lap, scribbling furious notes. Or you could just keep knitting and listen twice as I did. I don't like the title at all. It suggests a flippancy or jokester element that is not in the book. We are all misquoting Jesus simply because the original texts are lost and nobody had a tape recorder running when Jesus was teaching. His first listeners and everyone since have done the best they could. Really.

    The author is a fine scholar who built on his youthful passion for Bible study and went so far as to learn the original languages and immerse himself in the absorbing study of ancient documents, second-guessing the old scribes, reasoning through all the whys and wherefores. What this book does is impress the lay-person with how much he doesn't know, can't know, and has to trust the scholars about. Mr. Ehrman gives fascinating specific examples of the kinds of mistakes that were made over centuries of copying -- some accidental, some deliberate tweaking in a time before printing presses or copy machines. There was no respect for copyright. If material was being dictated, a word that sounded similar might be substituted inadvertantly.

    I majored in English, so studied Chaucer and Shakespeare. I understood that the King James Bible was not telling me to go in my clothes CLOSET to pray among the boots and tennis shoes, although that could be a good place. I also came through a rigorous Sunday School and Bible study regimen as a kid. One college required four units of religion for graduation. That expanded my understanding. A visit to the un-Holy Land helped as well. This author does not speak down to anyone. He manages to include all of us as his friends and fellow students. I stayed interested. I can only imagine how difficult it would be to decide where to stop in taking up this study. Does an eager young person learn Latin, Greek and Hebrew and start studying old documents -- or does she learn enough to appreciate the more thorny passages, the major puzzles, and then proceed to ministerial life? This is the stuff of entire lifetimes! I have to think of the people who want to learn the computer, starting with bits and bytes and ones and zeros. They don't understand that they can learn to click a mouse and be gaming on FaceBook by suppertime! At any rate, this is a book I think the whole family would enjoy together, although I would never ever insist any child sit and listen! The old folks could play it on a road trip and the kids pick up a bit by osmosis. Even a teen would best find this subject gently for himself. The author gives a history of this study of Biblical texts so that we can investigate further to our heart's content. Huge subject! Absorbing listen!

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Meditations

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Marcus Aurelius
    • Narrated By Duncan Steen
    Overall
    (284)
    Performance
    (241)
    Story
    (247)

    One of the most significant books ever written by a head of State, the Meditations are a collection of philosophical thoughts by the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180 ce). Covering issues such as duty, forgiveness, brotherhood, strength in adversity and the best way to approach life and death, the Meditations have inspired thinkers, poets and politicians since their first publication more than 500 years ago. Today, the book stands as one of the great guides and companions - a cornerstone of Western thought.

    Guilherme says: "Stoic Wisdom at it's best"
    "MAGNIFICENT NARRATION BUT VERY DEPRESSING MESSAGE"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I wish I had gotten around to this classic many years ago. At this stage of my life, I am finding love and joy and good works everywhere I look. I am way, way too far along to need reminding that we all die soon anyway, or to contemplate what happens to dead bodies or any more dismal nonsense.

    Yes, it's a classic and Wikipedia has a wonderful long article about this fine person.

    I want to recognize Duncan Steen's wonderful, smooth reading of this work. He sounds a bit like my old teacher, Stuart Wilde, another Brit. He reads with understanding so that the listener is better able to understand also. He varies his pace and tone so that the listener is refreshed. I never had the feeling that he was just droning on. I will definitely follow this narrator.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Sense and Sensibility

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By Jane Austen
    • Narrated By Juliet Stevenson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (865)
    Performance
    (505)
    Story
    (508)

    When Mrs. Dashwood is forced by an avaricious daughter-in-law to leave the family home in Sussex, she takes her three daughters to live in a modest cottage in Devon. For Elinor, the eldest daughter, the move means a painful separation from the man she loves, but her sister Marianne finds in Devon the romance and excitement which she longs for.

    Jo says: "Superb - Justice to Jane Austen and Emma Thompson"
    "GREAT STORY, AWESOME READER, TECH GLITCHES"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I can't believe the people who were bored or somehow didn't get this wonderful story. There are three sisters in the story, but the youngest is not even allowed to come along. So we have two very different sisters affected by learning that the men they had pinned their hopes on had betrayed them. So we have the older girl, Eleanor, in a lifetime friendship with a young man who is like a brother, but all ready to become much, much more. Until Eleanor meets a horrible little chippie who confides to her that she is engaged to the very same man! She tells Eleanor in awful uneducated English all about the wedding plans. Eleanor quietly implodes because by this time she must do damage control with her younger sister, Marianne, who has fallen passionately in love with an enchanting young man. Their love blooms; he takes her to his home, walks her through it and they imagine it spiffed up with paint and new furniture, and they will live there blissfully together! It just gets better and better. Until it becomes clear that he has married a wealthy woman who is not a tenth as pretty or winsome as Marianne. And it comes out that he is a genuine cad, with a great career of courting vulnerable girls and leaving them in a very bad way. This man was SO handsome and SO clever and SO beguiling toward Marianne that her anguish at learning the truth -- and the way Ms. Stevenson reads Austen's words -- must be a high point in literature. Any listener with two IQ points and two ears would remember being 17 again and crying hot tears because Allen was holding hands with that other girl. Or Bill was spending way too much time with ugly pimply Toni (who was known to go "all the way"). Some of the background is different, but the youthful suffering is quite the same. Surely male listeners who have suffered over a heartless girl with a flippy pony tail will be able to relate. And the hurt goes on and on and on as the sisters analyze how right it all seemed at the time and why did he act that way and say those things if he didn't mean them? And what changed his mind? And how could he!

    AND THEN JUST AT THE BEGINNING OF PART TWO, A GLITCH IN THE RECORDING SICKENED AND LAID LOW iRENE iPOD, MY MAGNIFICENT 80GB iPOD CLASSIC. SHE HAD TO BE LAID ON HER BACK, GENTLY PUNCHED IN THE BELLY FOR CPR, GIVEN INTENSIVE ENCOURAGEMENT AND AUDIBLE TECHNICIANS CALLED. WE SPENT LITERALLY HOURS DELETING PART TWO FROM THE iPOD, DOWNLOADING DIFFERENT FORMATS, BLAH BLAH BLAH. NICE PEOPLE IN THE CARIBBEAN, BUT MY iPOD IS STILL JAMMING AT THE SAME POINT. NO THANK YOU, AUDIBLE! STOP RECOMMENDING BOOKS I HAVE ALREADY READ AND GET BUSY FIXING THESE GLITCHES! ALL AMAZON'S MARKETING CAN'T REPLACE TECHNICAL EXCELLENCE!

    This is the second book I have had to listen to sitting at my computer where the speakers cannot be turned up quite loud enough. I need the story on the iPod and to take to my work! That story had only one narrator and one recorded version. At least with this book I have a huge choice of narrators for a second try. Why so many? And which might be the best? In a week or two, I hope to write a happy positive review of this book with a different recording. And find out what happens to these two young ladies. Sometimes we listeners have to work hard to make our own happy endings!

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.