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Praetor

ratings
50
REVIEWS
12
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
6
HELPFUL VOTES
13

  • Debt: The First 5,000 Years

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By David Graeber
    • Narrated By Grover Gardner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (311)
    Performance
    (266)
    Story
    (268)

    Every economics textbook says the same thing: Money was invented to replace onerous and complicated barter systems - to relieve ancient people from having to haul their goods to market. The problem with this version of history? There’s not a shred of evidence to support it. Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods - that is, long before the invention of coins or cash.

    E. J. Ford says: "Stands Economics on Its Head"
    "Truly thought provoking"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A fresh look at the history of money, credit, and the economy in general. The author questions many of the commonly-held assumption about the nature, and the very existence of "the market", and raises fascinating questions. Some of the issues he discusses are so basic to our thinking, that we rarely think of questioning them. One such point is "one should pay his debts" - but why, exactly? Shouldn't the lender carry some risk, if the debtor fails? What came first, money or credit? Was money really invented to replace systems of barter?

    This was truly one of most thought provoking works I've read or listened to in a long time, and I fully recommend it.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • A History of the Middle Ages

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Crane Brinton, John Christopher, Robert Wolff
    • Narrated By Charlton Griffin
    Overall
    (614)
    Performance
    (206)
    Story
    (201)

    A History of the Middle Ages is the amazing story of European man in transition. It is a dramatic chronicle of 1,000 years of political, social, and economic transformation beginning with the dissolution of the classical Mediterranean civilization and ending with the first flowering of the Renaissance. It is also the story of two new religions, Christianity and Islam, both of which were destined to dominate the mind of every person in those new civilizations arising in their wake.

    Theresa says: "A Stunning Achievement"
    "Interesting, but something's very weird here"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A wide-ranging discussion of the various political, cultural and economical events in the middle ages in Europe and the Middle East. I found it very interesting, though sometimes a bit repetitive, and not of terribly clear structure. I bought this since I enjoy history, and realized I know very little about the middle ages.

    The performance is reasonable, though the narrator seems to emphasize every second word, with a strong, sometimes distracting, British accent.

    But, to me, the more interesting part is - what is this book? It doesn't appear to be the audio version of a written book - I could find no such physical book. This is already peculiar.

    When was the text written? Throughout the work, time and again there are references to the middle of the 20th century as the modern times, or the present day. This perhaps shouldn't be surprising - if I'm not misidentifying, the person listed as lead author, Crane Brinton, died in 1968. I couldn't find any information about the other two authors, nor any information about how Brinton is connected to this work (it isn't listed on his bibliography).

    Even more strangely, the epilogue is written by yet another person - James Westfall Thompson (identified in the book by his full name, so I'm quite certain of this), who died in 1941. That bit of the book contains a bit about how "Noble families fell into the clutches of Jew money-lenders" ... I guess this was a reasonable sentence to write in the 1930s, or whenever.

    So - what's going on? It's not necessarily bad if the text is rather old, but this needs to be properly explained. While the middle ages have been studied for a long time, and I'm not doubting mid-20th century historians' knowledge, surely some advances have been made. New archaeological finds, newly found documents, advanced scientific analysis of old samples, and simply new understanding and thought.

    I did find a possible source - Crane, Christopher and Wolff wrote a several-volume tome named "A History of Civilization", published in 1960 or earlier by Prentice Hall. Possibly, this audiobook is Volume 1 of that work, or is at least related to it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Island 731

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Jeremy Robinson
    • Narrated By R. C. Bray
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (168)
    Performance
    (149)
    Story
    (153)

    Mark Hawkins, former park ranger and expert tracker, is out of his element, working onboard the Magellan, a research vessel studying the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. But his work is interrupted when, surrounded by 30 miles of refuse, the ship and its high-tech systems are plagued by a series of strange malfunctions and the crew is battered by a raging storm. When the storm fades and the sun rises, the beaten crew awakens to find themselves anchored in the protective cove of a tropical island...and no one knows how they got there.

    Matthew says: "Beware of your next Pacific cruise"
    "B-movie: The Novel"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Essentially a horror B-movie in book form. The plot is rather ridiculous, with one absurd occurrence after another, to the point I sometimes rolled my eyes. But it wasn't bad, just silly. If you enjoy silly horror movies, you'll like this.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Gray Man

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Mark Greaney
    • Narrated By Jay Snyder
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4060)
    Performance
    (3061)
    Story
    (3037)

    Court Gentry is known as The Gray Man - a legend in the covert realm, moving silently from job to job, accomplishing the impossible, and then fading away. And he always hits his target. But there are forces more lethal than Gentry in the world. And in their eyes, Gentry has just outlived his usefulness. Now, he is going to prove that for him, there's no gray area between killing for a living-and killing to stay alive.

    Jason Spencer says: "Action packed, edge of your seat "page-turner""
    "Exquisitely enjoyable thriller"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is not a complicated book. It's a relatively straight-forward thriller, and is simply loads of fun. The action sequences feel cinematic, are well written and very exciting. Unlike in some novels, our hero, I was glad to hear, is not invincible, and he hurts, bleeds, and needs help from time to time. Not everything is completely realistic, but who cares?

    I usually listen to audio-books while doing chores around the house, and I seriously looked forward to doing them, just to hear what happens to our hero next.

    I don't have much more to say - it's a fun adventure, and I highly recommend it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World

    • UNABRIDGED (29 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By Daniel Yergin
    • Narrated By Robert Petkoff
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (275)
    Performance
    (215)
    Story
    (215)

    A master storyteller as well as a leading energy expert, Yergin shows us how energy is an engine of global political and economic change. It is a story that spans the energies on which our civilization has been built and the new energies that are competing to replace them. From the jammed streets of Beijing to the shores of the Caspian Sea, from the conflicts in the Mideast to Capitol Hill and Silicon Valley, Yergin takes us into the decisions that are shaping our future.

    Joshua Kim says: "Best nonfiction book of 2011"
    "Extensive review of today's energy supply"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book provides a broad review of the major energy sources, how they were developed, what is their current status, and the various energy security questions related to them. It appears well researched, and is quite interesting.

    Note that the book does not discuss any future sources, or possible technological innovations, but is focused on the past and present of energy.

    The performance is, in general, a good one, save for a strange production issue - there's no pause before starting a new chapter, so it's difficult to understand a new chapter is starting, and this is its title.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Memorial Day

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Vince Flynn
    • Narrated By George Guidall
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2717)
    Performance
    (1841)
    Story
    (1823)

    It's just seven days before Memorial Day, and a spike in CIA intelligence has pointed to a major terrorist attack on the United States. Now it's up to counterterrorism operative Mitch Rapp to pull out all the stops. Rapp immediately leaves for Afghanistan, where he leads a special forces unit on a daring commando raid across the border into a remote Pakistani village. Their target: an al-Qaeda stronghold. Rapp and his team soon discover plans for a catastrophic nuclear attack on Washington, DC.

    Guy says: "Flynn's best Mitch Rapp Book"
    "Entertaining, but unremarkable"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Essentially, quite like every thriller you've ever read. It's well-written, but the whole "terrorists are planning to harm the US and the only one who can stop them is an agent who doesn't play by the rules" is getting really old. It passes the time, but isn't that exciting. The narrator's great, though.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Killer of Little Shepherds: A True Crime Story and the Birth of Forensic Science

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Douglas Starr
    • Narrated By Erik Davies
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (219)
    Performance
    (146)
    Story
    (143)

    A riveting true crime story that vividly recounts the birth of modern forensics. At the end of the nineteenth century, serial murderer Joseph Vacher, known and feared as “The Killer of Little Shepherds,” terrorized the French countryside. He eluded authorities for years - until he ran up against prosecutor Emile Fourquet and Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne, the era’s most renowned criminologist.

    Praetor says: "Masterly introduction to modern forensic science"
    "Masterly introduction to modern forensic science"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    In this book, Starr expertly weaves the story of turn-of-the-century serial killer Joseph Vacher, with the early heroes of forensic science. The book is simply fascinating, both the tales of Vacher's crimes and the hunt for him, and the various people developing methods in forensics (like how to perform an autopsy, determine a person's height from a few bones, or finding out how long ago a person died). The book is well paced, and the performance of the narrator, Erik Davies, is wonderful.

    I truly have nothing negative to say about it - it's great.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 10 mins)
    • By Tim Wu
    • Narrated By Marc Vietor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (737)
    Performance
    (430)
    Story
    (428)

    Could history repeat itself, with one giant entity taking control of American information? Most consider the Internet Age to be a moment of unprecedented freedom in communications and culture. But as Tim Wu shows, each major new medium, from telephone to cable, arrived on a similar wave of idealistic optimism only to become, eventually, the object of industrial consolidation profoundly affecting how Americans communicate.

    Neil says: "Very interesting history, biased conclusions"
    "Comprehensive history of the communications market"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book presents a comprehensive history and analysis of the modern US communications market, from the invention of the telephone, to the internet today. Over and over a monopoly is born, new technology rises and attempts to overthrow it, but often fails, but the monopoly eventually collapses, letting the new kids take over. The role of government in sustaining these monopolies and quashing competition is particularly illuminating, especially considering the free-market ethos so central to US thinking. It's all very interesting, and I feel I learned a lot from it.

    Two caveats, though: the narration is merely adequate, and sometimes feels wooden and forced. It didn't seriously bother me, but a better performance would have helped. Second, and this is important to remember, Wu discuss the US market, almost to the exclusion of the rest of the world. When foreign lands do appear, it's usually only because they relate directly to the US market at that point (like a source of imported films in the early 20th century). That's not too bad, as the US was definitely the source of developments in the communications market, but just be aware of this limitation.

    All in all, I enjoyed it, and can recommend it if you want to learn more about this field.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • How An Economy Grows And Why It Crashes

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Peter D Schiff, Andrew J Schiff
    • Narrated By Peter D. Schiff, Andrew J. Schiff
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (455)
    Performance
    (357)
    Story
    (352)

    How an Economy Grows and Why it Crashes uses illustration, humor, and accessible storytelling to explain complex topics of economic growth and monetary systems. In it, economic expert and bestselling author of Crash Proof, Peter Schiff teams up with his brother Andrew to apply their signature "take no prisoners" logic to expose the glaring fallacies that have become so ingrained in our country's economic conversation.

    AC says: "Educational and Entertaining"
    "Condensing the American economy into a parable"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The book is essentially a parable of the growth of an economy, and eventually the growth and 20th century crises of the American economy. I can't say that it taught me a lot I didn't already know, but it does provide lots of information in condensed form. The format of a parable helps to clarify the authors' points, however it might also over-simplify, and make it easier to ignore points that might not fit with the authors' viewpoint. The points made do feel over-simplified at-times, and a slightly deeper discussion would have helped.

    Their viewpoint, by the way, is quite reasonable - that the idea that consumer spending (fuelled by government-backed cheap credit) can be an engine of economic growth is an absurdity. Economic growth has to be based on actual production. They heavily criticize the US administration's response to the current crisis (throwing more money at the market, and pushing even more cheap credit - that caused the crisis in the first place). The essence of their argument is that the heavy government meddling in the market is at-least partially responsible for the meltdown, and that their response prevents the market from healing - the companies/people who made foolish choices, like trying to "flip" investment homes, should pay the price, instead of transferring their mistakes to all tax-payers.

    Even if you don't fully agree with their analysis, this is an enjoyable listen, and I recommend it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Poorly Made in China: An Insider's Account of the Tactics Behind China's Production Game

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Paul Midler
    • Narrated By Paul Midler
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (263)
    Performance
    (192)
    Story
    (194)

    It was a world gone wrong, one in which manufacturers thought little of manipulating product quality levels in order to save the smallest amounts, where savvy foreign business leaders were made to feel in control while they were taken for a ride by their partners, where entire manufacturing facilities sometimes vanished right into thin air... Welcome to Poorly Made in China!

    John says: "Hours of jaw dropping amazment"
    "Fascinating look at what "Made in China" means"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Midler worked as a consultant to firms, mostly American, wanting to manufacture in China, and served as a translator/mediator/man-on-the-ground for his American employers. As such he often discovered the ways the Chinese factory owners play various quality games to increase their profits, regardless of contracts, previous understanding, or even what we view as basic safety and quality standards.
    His book provides a fascinating view into what goes on in such factories, and the different point-of-view the Chinese manufacturers have of things, both economic and cultural, which make dialogue often difficult and frustrating.

    I thoroughly enjoyed the book, which was very ably read by Midler himself (a reasonable choice, as he often mentions and explains Chinese words and phrases).

    I found only two issues with this book - first, the points he makes are sometimes repetitive, making the same observation twice or more. Some judicious editing would have removed these instances. Second, being mostly a collection of different experiences, the book feels disjointed at times. Though every tale serves a purpose, and Midler ties them together reasonably well, it doesn't feel continuous enough.

    These points are minor, though, and did not seriously affect my enjoyment of this enlightening work.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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