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Peter

Southbury, CT, United States | Member Since 2015

9
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 1 reviews
  • 2 ratings
  • 31 titles in library
  • 3 purchased in 2015
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  • Report from Nuremberg: The International War Crimes Trial

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs)
    • By Harold Burson
    • Narrated By Christian Rummel, Richard McGonagle, Gabrielle De Cuir, and others
    Overall
    (78)
    Performance
    (68)
    Story
    (69)

    Audible brings to life through dramatic performance the 1945-1946 radio broadcast reports covering the greatest courtroom drama of the 20th century - the Nuremberg trials. The original broadcasts have been lost forever, but the verbatim text - written by Harold Burson, founding chairman of one of the world’s leading public relations firms, Burson Marsteller, who at the time was a reporter for the Armed Forces Network - has been newly interpreted by an ensemble of some of our fine actors.

    Peter says: "Now there was radio!"
    "Now there was radio!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What made the experience of listening to Report from Nuremberg the most enjoyable?

    This audio book is well worth a listen for the colorful first person descriptions from the AFN reporter Harold Burson about the Nazi leadership and the tenor of the Nurember trial. In that courtroom Cpl. Burson literally had a front row seat to history, and he did a terrific job in doing what radio reporters should do - bring the audience into the courtroom by his vivid descriptions. The names of the defendants mean little when read in the history books, but he tried to separate them in character from the "colorful scoundrel" (Goering) to the dutiful officers (Keitel, Jodl) to the bureaucratic monsters (Sauckel, Seyss-Inquart).


    What did you like best about this story?

    The frank description of Hermann Goering's takeover of the trial as he took the witness stand. I had heard after-the-fact criticism of Justice Jack's cross-examination, but Cpl. Burson confirmed it in his same-day commentary.


    9 of 9 people found this review helpful

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