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Mountain K9iner

ratings
6
REVIEWS
6
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
5

  • Claudius the God

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Robert Graves
    • Narrated By Nelson Runger
    Overall
    (204)
    Performance
    (102)
    Story
    (103)

    Robert Graves continues Claudius' story with the epic adulteries of Messalina, King Herod Agrippa's betrayal of his old friend, and the final arrival of that bloodthirsty teenager, Nero.

    Darwin8u says: "The Deified King of Historical Fiction"
    "Must read after I Claudius"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about this story?

    This is the sequel to Robert Graves's well-known I Claudius. Listen to I Claudius first (I prefer the Nelson Runger performance -- he captures well Graves's portrayal of Claudius as a reluctant and ill-prepared emperor). After listening to I Claudius, you will want to know what happened next -- or at least how Graves portrays it. And yes, it is largely fictional, though based on period sources. Even what we call "history" is, at it's best, a kind of fiction in that it is only as good as the sources and only as reliable as the conjectures we make to stitch the "facts" together. Graves will not mislead you, and I guarantee you'll remember more about the Claudian era from this than from any history book!

    I gave this four stars instead of five for story -- it is not quite as compelling as I Claudius, but still quite worthwhile.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • A History of Rome

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Cyril Edward Robinson
    • Narrated By Charlton Griffin
    Overall
    (6)
    Performance
    (6)
    Story
    (6)

    A History of Rome is the story of a tiny market town on the Tiber, its rise to world domination, and then its slow, terrible plunge to utter ruin. The rise and fall of Rome is the most thrilling event in world history. And in the hands of master historian Cyril Robinson we hear the narrative of this incredible story in unsurpassed, brilliant, and eloquent language.

    Mountain K9iner says: "Helpful Overview, but Dated and too Superficial"
    "Helpful Overview, but Dated and too Superficial"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

    Robinson's History of Rome is helpful for acquiring the overall narrative of Rome's history from the early Republic up to Alaric. If all you want is an accessible, non-academic overview of the Republic and the subsequent emperors, this will probably be just fine.If you are a more serious student of classical history, this may not be for you. The work is seriously dated, both in terms of his interpretation of archeological evidence, and in terms of Robinson's assumption that Greek culture and manipulative women are largely to blame for Rome's decline."The History of Ancient Rome," a Great Courses lecture series taught by Prof. Fagan and available on audible.com is a more thorough and up to date resource than Robinson's work.


    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Greece and Rome: An Integrated History of the Ancient Mediterranean

    • ORIGINAL (18 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By The Great Courses, Robert Garland
    • Narrated By Professor Robert Garland
    Overall
    (63)
    Performance
    (59)
    Story
    (56)

    Integrated approaches to teaching Greek and Roman history are a rarity in academia. Most scholars are historians of either Greek or Roman history and perform research solely in that specific field, an approach that author and award-winning Professor Robert Garland considers questionable.In these 36 passionate lectures, he provides and impressive and rare opportunity to understand the two dominant cultures of the ancient Mediterranean world in relation to one another-a relationship that has virtually no parallel in world history.

    Julia says: "Totally Fascinating"
    "Excellent content with some caveats"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    Prof. Garland makes clear from several perspectives why we cannot understand or appreciate ancient Rome apart from its relationship to ancient Greece. I now appreciate more than ever the concept "Greco-Roman." This course is excellent, but there are some shortcomings the listener should be aware of.

    1. Garland occasionally argues from etymologies to support some of his interpretations. This method of argumentation has been discredited for over 50 years. His conclusions may be correct, but when he etymologizes his methodology is suspect.

    2. Garland, in spite of his protestations against it, seems unable to resist playing the role of a long-distance armchair psychologist analyzing the interior motives of long-dead ancient persons about whom we know very little.

    3. Garland's presentation of the relationship between Christianity and Greco-Roman culture is superficial at best and just plain wrong at worst. He fails to present (or understand?) the essentially Jewish nature of primitive (including Pauline) Christianity. Further, while he argues that Christianity is essentially an amalgamation of elements derived from contemporaneous Mediterranean religions, he also argues that Christianity thoroughly overhauled the ideology and worldview of the Greco-Roman world. How what was essentially a patchwork of existing religious beliefs could have had such a thoroughgoing transformational effect he does not even address or question. He does not appear to be aware of this apparent contradiction.

    That being said, the course is well worth it and I will listen to some of Prof. Garland's other presentations.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Rome and the Barbarians

    • ORIGINAL (18 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Kenneth W. Harl
    Overall
    (42)
    Performance
    (40)
    Story
    (40)

    The history of the Romans as they advanced the frontiers of Classical civilization is often told as a story of warfare and conquest-the mighty legions encountering the "barbarians." But this only tells one side of the story.Who were the Celts, Goths, Huns, and Persians met by the Romans as they marched north and east? What were the political, military, and social institutions that made Rome so stable, allowing its power to be wielded against these different cultures for nearly three centuries?

    Mike says: "History of Rome from the Barbarian's Perspective!"
    "Packed with information!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    This series of lectures is packed with information. Prof. Harl works with a couple of overall interpretive positions (e.g., Rome's interactions with its neighbors was far more than combative) and provides voluminous information in support. This course can be a bit overwhelming in the amount of information provided, but well worth it. For me it will require at least a second listen.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Golden Apples of the Sun: And Other Stories

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Ray Bradbury
    • Narrated By Michael Prichard
    Overall
    (32)
    Performance
    (23)
    Story
    (23)

    Ray Bradbury is a modern cultural treasure. His disarming simplicity of style underlies a towering body of work unmatched in metaphorical power by any other American storyteller. And here are 32 of his most famous tales - prime examples of the poignant and mysterious poetry that Bradbury uniquely uncovers in the depths of the human soul, the otherwordly portraits that spring from the canvas of one of the century's great men of imagination.

    Maliboo says: "2 Books in 1"
    "One of my favorite authors"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    If you could sum up The Golden Apples of the Sun in three words, what would they be?

    Well worth it if only for "Here there by Tygers" and "Frost and Fire." These are two stories that give imaginative language to some of our deepest feelings and fears.


    What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

    The narrator is a bit too melancholic -- certainly there is an underlying sadness to many of the stories, but the narrator's style overlays the entire collection more despair than the stories naturally elicit.

    Even so, Bradbury's storytelling power is so strong that it overcomes the narrator's one-stringed guitar.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Fifty Short Stories

    • UNABRIDGED (25 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By O. Henry, Edgar Allan Poe, W. W. Jacobs, and others
    • Narrated By Cathy Dobson
    Overall
    (7)
    Performance
    (7)
    Story
    (7)

    Fifty of the world's greatest classic short stories: 1.The Necklace by Guy de Maupassant 2.The One Million Pound Banknote by Mark Twain 3.The Phantom Rickshaw by Rudyard Kipling 4.The Fly by Katherine Mansfield 5.The Black Cat by Edgar Allan Poe 6.My Favorite Murder by Ambrose Bierce 7.The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe 8.One Thousand Dollars by O. Henry 9.Regret by Kate Chopin 10.The Nose by Nikolai Gogol 11.The Mezzotint by M. R. James 12.The Gift of the Magi by O. Henry

    Mountain K9iner says: "A Good Choice"
    "A Good Choice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What about Cathy Dobson’s performance did you like?

    The narrator is certainly a gifted linguist, and able to reproduce seemingly authentic accents from a variety of European languages. There are two drawbacks to her narration. The first is that her British accent is so refined that at times it comes across as affected. The second is that a British accent just cannot do justice to Mark Twain, the quintessential American storyteller! These aside, I would still purchase another audiobook with Dobson as the reader.


    Any additional comments?

    The collection is a bit unbalanced toward Poe and Twain. I would have liked to have seen a greater variety, including Kafka, Bradbury, and Borges. All in all, though, I had never read most of the stories and enjoyed the selections.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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