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Mark

AUSTIN, TX, United States | Member Since 2009

15
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 13 reviews
  • 234 ratings
  • 692 titles in library
  • 13 purchased in 2014
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  • Sharpe's Triumph: Book II of the Sharpe Series

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Bernard Cornwell
    • Narrated By Frederick Davidson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (492)
    Performance
    (238)
    Story
    (240)

    The paths of treachery lead Sharpe's company to join the army of Sir Arthur Wellesley, the future Duke of Wellington, to take on the Mahratta horde. Sharpe must survive the carnage and live to tell the tale of what will be remembered as one of the greatest battles of the 19th century.

    Don says: "Great story - Poor narration quality"
    "Poor production quality."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The story is great--this is a solid sequel to Sharpe's Tiger. I give the performance two stars, though, because of the poor production quality. A few times, I could hear the difference where the narrator had read something at a different time from the rest of the passage. Worse, the audio had some glitches and stutters, causing the same word to play several times before the audio continued. Not the quality I expect from Audible.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Ark Royal

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Christopher G. Nuttall
    • Narrated By Ralph Lister
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (756)
    Performance
    (708)
    Story
    (712)

    Seventy years ago, the interstellar supercarrier Ark Royal was the pride of the Royal Navy. But now, her weapons are outdated and her solid-state armour nothing more than a burden on her colossal hull. She floats in permanent orbit near Earth, a dumping ground for the officers and crew the Royal Navy wishes to keep out of the public eye. But when a deadly alien threat appears, the modern starships built by humanity are no match for the powerful alien weapons.

    C. Hartmann says: "TWO (!!) audiobooks this year get SIX stars"
    "Leaves the "sci" out of sci-fi"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What disappointed you about Ark Royal?

    The most disappointing thing to me was just how boring the battles ultimately were. Even the characters seemed bored--in the middle of a supposedly heated battle, you'd find marines, pilots, and the captain "idly wondering" about all sorts of things. Really? Your mind was so disengaged that it just wandered off?


    What was most disappointing about Christopher G. Nuttall’s story?

    The other thing I found disappointing in a general sense was the lack of any attempt at scientific or mathematical explanations. It's really just space fiction. We have no idea how fast the weapons travel relative to each other or how fast the ships are moving or how far apart they are. Or, you have events that are just inconsistent, like a ship getting vaporized, leaving nothing but hull scraps (no intact systems or equipment), but there are intact bodies. Why is a body more likely to survive than, say, a weapon?


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    The basic premise is interesting. I liked the idea that even far in the future we'll still have nations on earth--a single unified world government has always struck me as improbable--though in practice it didn't have much effect on the plot. I also liked some of the characters and the concept of the aliens.


    Any additional comments?

    Other than people frequently "idly wondering," a few other phrases find themselves getting repeated a lot, like "gave them a bloody nose." It could have been better edited to remove the repetition.

    Do not believe all the 5-star reviews. It's not an awful book, but it's really not 5-star material. If you want British military sci-fi, On Basilisk Station is a better place to start.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Broken Soul: Jane Yellowrock, Book 8

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Faith Hunter
    • Narrated By Khristine Hvam
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (397)
    Performance
    (374)
    Story
    (371)

    Jane Yellowrock is a vampire killer for hire - but other creatures of the night still need to watch their backs....When the Master of the city of New Orleans asks Jane to improve security for a future visit from a delegation of European vampires, she names an exorbitant price - and Leo is willing to pay. That’s because the European vamps want Leo’s territory, and he knows that he needs Jane to prevent a total bloodbath.

    Crystal Wilson says: "U always surprise me"
    "Wildly inconsistent"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    This book swings back and forth between fun and drudgery. It has some exciting fights and entertaining dialogue, at times.

    Unfortunately the combat is often broken up by Jane contemplating the nature of time, physics, and metaphysics, or the historical roots of an enemy, or even mundane detective work provided by Alex. If Jane is so bored by what is going on that she finds herself thinking about something else, how is it supposed to keep my attention?

    Another thing that really bugged me was how inconsistent Jane's skills are. She goes between defeating super-powerful enemies with a single blow to getting stomped without doing any damage at all (and needing to be rescued), back again to powerful, and then to impotently watching the action. If you found yourself annoyed in Cat O' Nine Tails by Jane's frequent incompetence, near-death experiences, and rescues by Eli or Beast, well, that continues in this story.

    Finally, Jane's obsession with blaming herself for everything is getting a little grating. "I killed someone. In combat. I'm a murderer!" "Everything that has happened in New Orleans is MY FAULT!" No, it's really not.

    Up till now I've enjoyed these books because of the interesting mythology, character interactions and dialogue, and cool fights, but at this point I doubt I'll buy the next one.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Foundations of Eastern Civilization

    • ORIGINAL (23 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Craig G. Benjamin
    Overall
    (66)
    Performance
    (57)
    Story
    (58)

    China. Korea. Japan. Southeast Asia. How did Eastern civilization develop? What do we know about the history, politics, governments, art, science, and technology of these countries? And how does the story of Eastern civilization play out in today's world of business, politics, and international exchange?

    Acteon says: "A worthwhile "big-history" survey"
    "great overview"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    I really enjoyed this lecture as an introduction to Chinese/Far Eastern history. I started out not knowing much at all about anything farther east than Persia, and now feel like I have a solid grasp on the general course of Chinese history, and would not like to learn more about a few specific periods and places that I had never heard of before (such as the Kushan empire).

    One thing I did not like about this course was the inconsistent or inaccurate pronunciation of various place names and dynasties. Sometimes he pronounces a word correctly the first time, but then anglicizes it more later--and at times the pronunciation is not only incorrect, but leaves you with an entirely mistaken idea of how it might be spelled (which makes it harder to look further into an interesting topic).

    Otherwise it was an informative and enjoyable listen.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Steelheart: Reckoners, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Brandon Sanderson
    • Narrated By MacLeod Andrews
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (6970)
    Performance
    (6498)
    Story
    (6524)

    Ten years ago, Calamity came. It was a burst in the sky that gave ordinary men and women extraordinary powers. The awed public started calling them Epics. But Epics are no friend of man. With incredible gifts came the desire to rule. And to rule man you must crush his wills. Nobody fights the Epics...nobody but the Reckoners. A shadowy group of ordinary humans, they spend their lives studying Epics, finding their weaknesses, and then assassinating them. And David wants in. He wants Steelheart - the Epic who is said to be invincible. The Epic who killed David's father.

    D says: "He got the idea from a near traffic accident"
    "good YA fantasy novel"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    If you enjoy young adult fantasy, then you'll almost certainly enjoy this book. For some reason I didn't realize it was more aimed at kids when I got it and was a little disappointed. The concept of this book (super "heroes" are real but they are all villains) is pretty interesting, and the story has some good twists and minor mysteries


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Blood Cross: Jane Yellowrock, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Faith Hunter
    • Narrated By Khristine Hvam
    Overall
    (1880)
    Performance
    (1558)
    Story
    (1562)

    Jane Yellowrock is back on the prowl against the children of the night. The vampire council has hired skinwalker Yellowrock to hunt and kill one of their own who has broken sacred ancient rules - but Jane quickly realizes that in a community that is thousands of years old, loyalties run deep.

    Ducky says: "GO JANE!!! GO FAITH!! AND GO KHRISTINE!!"
    "Not as good as the first one"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Although I enjoyed this book, and will probably listen to the next one, I was disappointed. There were a few things I really didn't care for, particularly toward the end of the book. Just before the final battle, the author gives a slow and detailed account of Jane shifting into Beast, and it just bugged the heck out of me. An explanation of how the magic works makes sense at the beginning of the first book. It even makes a little sense near the beginning of the second book, as a reminder. Throwing all that in at the end of the second book near the most exciting part is just a pointless waste of time.

    Other things that frustrated me were her questionable decisions on who to bring and not to bring to the final battle, and then waiting for the enemies to gather their power and start a ritual before attacking--after she had already been told it was dangerous to interrupt a ritual. What's better, waiting to see how a ritual works or stopping it before it starts? I understand that the author probably wanted to get a description of the ritual in there, but the reasoning for allowing it to even start was extremely sketchy.

    Finally, without spoiling anything, I didn't like her choice of men. I agreed with her reasoning for not choosing the one, but I can't help but think the same reasoning would have applied to the other. Oh well. I guess I knew it was inevitable from the first book, but I don't have to like it.

    I don't want this review to be entirely negative, because I still enjoyed most of the book until the end. There were some cool interactions with Leo and other vamps toward the middle of the book, and we got to see a lot of new backstory on both Jane and the vamps. The explanation for why vamps are the way they are was interesting and a lot more coherent than most other fantasy worlds.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Blade Itself: The First Law: Book One

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Joe Abercrombie
    • Narrated By Steven Pacey
    Overall
    (4171)
    Performance
    (3095)
    Story
    (3108)

    Inquisitor Glokta, a crippled and bitter relic of the last war, former fencing champion turned torturer, is trapped in a twisted and broken body - not that he allows it to distract him from his daily routine of torturing smugglers.Nobleman, dashing officer and would-be fencing champion Captain Jezal dan Luthar is living a life of ease by cheating his friends at cards. Vain and shallow, the biggest blot on his horizon is having to get out of bed in the morning to train with obsessive and boring old men.

    Steven says: "Steven Pacey is magnificient."
    "Interesting take on fantasy"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This review is more for the entire series than this one book. I did read to the entire series, and, for the most part, I enjoyed it. The narrator is good, and I liked the dark tone of the books. In some ways, this review would be more appropriate for book three, but I assume people picking up the first book are considering reading all three.

    The style and tone of the entire series is much more realistic than most fantasy works. That, I appreciated. "You have to be realistic about these things." Mr. Abercrombie continually upsets fantasy tropes, taking a left when a right is expected. He sets up fairly believable characters with faults and weaknesses. All of the characters change throughout the series, if only in our perception of them. I especially appreciated Inquisitor Glokta, a profession torturer and POV character. It's not often you see such a unique persona.

    What I didn't like as much is the direction the author went for the third book. As I said before, Mr. Abercrombie takes a left when a right is expected. Unfortunately, he takes that to the extreme of predictability. Hardly anything surprised me toward the end, because all I had to do is ask myself "Would this character have a redeeming moment here or hook up with so-and-so or grow and become something greater?" The answer is "no."

    By the time you get there, it's not a surprise when things end up poorly. It's the kind of story the author is writing. That's fine, but it's not the kind of story I'm interested in reading. If I want to hear about the bad guys becoming richer and more powerful at the expense of good people, I'd watch the news. If you're interested in that sort of thing, though, you'll enjoy this series.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack: Burton & Swinburne, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Mark Hodder
    • Narrated By Gerard Doyle
    Overall
    (1218)
    Performance
    (1084)
    Story
    (1089)

    Sir Richard Francis Burton and Algernon Charles Swinburne are sucked into the perilous depths of a moral and ethical vacuum when Lord Palmerston commissions Burton to investigate assaults on young women committed by a weird apparition known as Spring Heeled Jack - and to find out why werewolves are terrorizing London's East End.

    Robert says: "Fun Steampunk but on the outlandish side"
    "Decent, but unbelievable"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is one of my first forays into the world of steampunk, and I wasn't impressed by this one. I enjoyed it enough to keep listening, but it wasn't a story to keep me hooked or interested in reading more by this author. The story takes place in the time that should be Victorian era England. The timeline has diverged, though, causing the world to end up quite different.

    On the plus side, the historical setting seemed well-researched. Out of curiosity, I looked up some of the characters, and they're quite accurate. The POV character really did know 20-some languages, fence, and work as a spy. Some parts I had a hard time believing were actually historical events. Truth is stranger than fiction, eh?

    On the negative side, other parts just bugged me. The author seems to believe that people go suddenly and irrevocably insane after traumatic events. Or, even not-so-traumatic events. One character is afraid that culture shock will drive him mad (spoilers: it does). Having traveled extensively myself and having lived abroad, I know that culture shock isn't something that drives you to insanity. It's called culture "shock" not culture "insanity" for a reason. A number of other minor points made me roll my eyes and go "Really?" To avoid spoilers, I won't go into the details.

    Regardless, it was reasonably interesting and well-read. I had no issues with the narration. If you're looking for a decent steampunk story without magic that doesn't care a lot about how the real world actually works, you could enjoy this book.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • A Dance with Dragons: A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 5

    • UNABRIDGED (49 hrs)
    • By George R. R. Martin
    • Narrated By Roy Dotrice
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (13236)
    Performance
    (11614)
    Story
    (11659)

    Dubbed the American Tolkien by Time magazine, George R. R. Martin has earned international acclaim for his monumental cycle of epic fantasy. Now the number-one New York Times best-selling author delivers the fifth book in his spellbinding landmark series - as both familiar faces and surprising new forces vie for a foothold in a fragmented empire.

    Ryan says: "Enjoyable, but a lot of setup"
    "Good, but ultimately frustrating"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    First the obvious: Yes, Roy Dotrice is back. That's good news overall, but he was never my favorite narrator and he's worse than he was in the first three books. Very few voices are the same (notably Davos and Tyrion). Dany is atrocious, and Tyrion, Jaime, and Cersei all pretty much share the same voice, or at least the same accent.

    The story, alas, is my biggest complaint. Mr. Martin continues to follow the same track he started down in AFFC, constantly promising resolution to certain storylines but never following through. People travel at the speed of plot--the amount of time it takes to travel from Westeros to Mareen is equal to however long it needs to take for everything to not happen in this book.

    My second complaint is the characters. Some appearances are welcome and seem to move along, others... not so much. Jon Snow and Dany were two of my favorites from the first three books, but just end up annoying me here. Both of them have turned from being mostly honorable pragmatists who did what was necessary for their people to being bleeding hearts who ignore the advice of (literally) everyone around them and generally make a mess of things, each in their own unique way.

    Of course, if you're even looking at this you're probably going to get the book anyway. I did enjoy it, overall, and look forward to the next. I wish, though, that I had waited for the next book, assuming we get a next book. The ending to ADWD is at least as unsatisfying as that of AFFC. Wait, if you can stand to.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Furies of Calderon: Codex Alera, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Jim Butcher
    • Narrated By Kate Reading
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4345)
    Performance
    (2999)
    Story
    (3035)

    In the realm of Alera, where people bond with the furies - elementals of earth, air, fire, water, and metal - 15-year-old Tavi struggles with his lack of furycrafting. But when his homeland erupts in chaos - when rebels war with loyalists and furies clash with furies - Tavi's simple courage will turn the tides of war.

    Jim says: "Remastered into chapters from CD."
    "Average, cliche, but entertaining"
    Overall

    Kate Reading did a fine job at narrating this book, giving characters different voices, with none that really annoyed me. Her male voices are believable. Unfortunately, the editing was poor, and frequently you can hear where the narration resumes too quickly after a pause.

    Also, for some reason I can't fathom they randomly inserted the sound of horns into the audio. They aren't at chapter breaks or anything of significance as far as I can tell, but they were very annoying.

    The book itself, while it stretched my suspension of disbelief past the limit and was very predictable, was entertaining. I liked the characters, by and large, which was a major factor. The magic system failed, I think. For example, one power Alerans with an air fury have is to smother someone without touching them. This ability was used once, and while it is referred to more often, it never reappears--even though it would have come in handy a number of times. That's just an example.

    The setting, while not ground-breaking, is interesting enough. One thing worth noting is that one of the main characters, Tavi, has no special powers at all in a world where magic is common. I was expecting (dreading) the author to hit a button and give him crazy god-mode powers, but it never happened. I appreciate that--very few fantasy authors seem willing to have a protagonist who isn't blessed with awesome.

    Overall, though I wasn't terribly impressed, I kept on reading, and I downloaded book #2. Make of that what you will.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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