You no longer follow Margaret

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Margaret

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Margaret

United States | Member Since 2010

39
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 43 reviews
  • 44 ratings
  • 210 titles in library
  • 33 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
2

  • Faithful Place: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Tana French
    • Narrated By Tim Gerard Reynolds
    Overall
    (3783)
    Performance
    (2155)
    Story
    (2159)

    New York Times best-selling author Tana French has won the prestigious Edgar, Barry, Macavity, and Anthony awards. As her third novel featuring the Dublin Murder Squad opens, 19-year-old Frank Mackey is waiting in vain for Rosie, who he’s supposed to run away to London with. But when she doesn’t show, Frank leaves Dublin without her—thinking never to return.

    Buffalogal says: "Incredible"
    "Engrossing with Rich Language - recommend!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A well-plotted novel rich with the vernacular of the Irish working class. Part nostalgic coming-of-age memoir, part class commentary, part detective novel, and part examination of what it means to be a modern man wrestling with your inner demons. What works for Dennis Lahaine, Frank McCourt, and good mystery writers all works here - interesting characters who are well-articulated enough to make you care what happens to them, shades of light and dark, an appealing anti-hero,and rich layers of the language of Dublin's working class.

    The narrator (Tim Gerard Reynolds) is SPECTACULAR and adds significantly to the enjoyment of the book. His rich capabilities with accent and the Dublin dialogue really makes the characters come alive. I would listen to other books just because they're narrated by this guy. He's as perfect a match to the book as Patrick Tull is to the Aubrey-Maturin books or Will Patton is to James Lee Burke.

    This is my first Tana French book; the others are already on my Audible wish list. Highly recommended.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Post Captain: Aubrey/Maturin Series, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Patrick O'Brian
    • Narrated By Patrick Tull
    Overall
    (840)
    Performance
    (413)
    Story
    (410)

    The Peace of Amiens has left Jack Aubrey with no ship, no enemy to pursue, and no possibility of prize money to supplement his meager income. His decision to seek refuge from his troubles, and creditors, in France proves doubly disastrous.

    A. F. Latronica III says: "A fair shake"
    "One of the Best - Superb - Tull Reigns Supreme"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The Aubrey/Maturin series is, as a body of work, the greatest set of novels in the English language. Post Captain is one of the best.

    Post Captain introduces both the ladies' auxilary of the series, with fierce Diana and beautiful Sophie, and also shows us the hilarious social commentary of the Austen-loving O'Brian at his best. There is plenty of war action - Jack and Stephen are on a number of ships - and a harrowing, wonderful trek across the Pyrenees with Jack disguised as a bear, ending in a visit to Stephen's castle. (This is a real castle - I have seen it.)

    And it introduces us to Stephen's identities as a natural historian and intelligence agent, that give so much color to the books over time.

    If you consume these auditorially, accept no substitutions for Patrick Tull as narrator. He is magnificent.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Master and Commander: Aubrey/Maturin Series, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Patrick O'Brian
    • Narrated By Patrick Tull
    Overall
    (2057)
    Performance
    (956)
    Story
    (948)

    This, the first in the splendid series of Jack Aubrey novels, establishes the friendship between Captain Aubrey, Royal Navy, and Stephen Maturin, ship's surgeon and intelligence agent, against the thrilling backdrop of the Napoleonic wars. Details of life aboard a man-of-war in Nelson's navy are faultlessly rendered: the conversational idiom of the officers in the ward room and the men on the lower deck, the food, the floggings, the mysteries of the wind and the rigging, and the road of broadsides as the great ships close in battle.

    Frank says: "Choice of Narrators"
    "Splendid. And accept NO SUBSTITUTIONS for Tull!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The Aubrey/Maturin novels, as a body of work, are the greatest novels in the English language.

    This, the first in the 20-book series, is very good. We meet Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin, before they have money, at the beginning of their careers, with uncertain prospects, learning about each other. We are introduced to most of the man-of-war's men that we will come to know over many books - Pullings, Mowatt, Babbington, Bonden, Killick. We find out Jack's a lady's man and that both Jack and Stephen love music.

    This novel has a greater emphasis on the wartime operations of the royal navy and battles at sea than the rest of the novels, which is to be expected as Jack and Stephen are only getting started.

    The books are even better when consumed audibly - but ONLY the versions narrated by Patrick Tull - accept no substitutions for the magnificent Tull. Tull is MAGNIFICENT.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Likeness

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Tana French
    • Narrated By Heather O'Neill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3009)
    Performance
    (1901)
    Story
    (1909)

    Tana French's debut, In the Woods, hit the New York Times best-seller list and drew rave reviews from the Times (London) and Booklist. Picking up six months later, this riveting sequel finds Detective Cassie Maddox still scarred by her last case. When her boyfriend calls her to a chilling murder scene, Cassie is forced to face her inner demons. A young woman has been found stabbed to death outside Dublin, and the victim looks just like Cassie.

    Michael says: "Really on a Different Level"
    "Writer and Narrator Bring Story to Life"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Tana French can write. She plots well, gets inside her characters' heads, brings the reader along, moves the pace quickly without leaving us behind, and manages to weave in modern social commentary and personal anchors around her characters along the way.

    The narrator here does a great job with Cassie Maddox's interior voice.

    The Likeness picks up six months or so after In the Woods, with a different character (Cassie Maddox - the partner of the protagonist in In the Woods). One of French's strengths is her ability to write each of these Dublin Murder Squad books from the perspective of a different, yet related, character. Here she's a female, and her female voice is as strong and authentic as her male voices in the third and fourth novels.

    A specialty of this book is the in-depth journey French takes us into undercover work - how detectives prepare for a role, maintain cover, manage the boundaries between their persona and reality, etc.

    The "family" of characters Cassie Maddox enters is well-drawn, and because she is under cover as the murder victim, gives the reader a unique view into a dead person's perspective.

    Highly recommend.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Between the Desire and the Dream: Selected Poems by T. S. Eliot

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 2 mins)
    • By T. S. Eliot
    • Narrated By Dennis Regan, Michelle Dumelle, Stephen O'Connor
    Overall
    (23)
    Performance
    (15)
    Story
    (18)

    Noble Prize winner T. S. Eliot wrote some of the best-known, most widely discussed poetry of the past 100 years. He was a daring and uncompromising innovator. With dramatic, original music, and expressive interpretation, this recording dramatizes why his works continue to influence literature - and touch contemporary listeners.

    Included are "The Love Son of J. Alfred Prufrock", "The Hollow Men", "Preludes", and "Portrait of a Lady".

    Laura says: "Words exquisite RUINED by music"
    "Dreadful, Overbearing Production Required Refund"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Whoever thought playing loud, discordant music that drowns out the sound of the reading of TS Eliot's "Hollow Men" was a good idea is an IDIOT. The poetry, of course, is the reason you download this - and you can't even HEAR it over the discordant cacophony of "music." And - uh - poetry has its own meter, so overlaying other soundtracks over it makes it pretty difficult to absorb the original work. I exercised Audible's refund option.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Leonardo's Swans

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Karen Essex
    • Narrated By Kathe Mazur
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (77)
    Performance
    (13)
    Story
    (13)

    Isabella d'Este, daughter of the Duke of Ferrara, born into privilege and the political and artistic turbulence of Renaissance Italy, is a stunning black-eyed blonde and a precocious lover and collector of art. Worldly and ambitious, she has never envied her less attractive sister, the spirited but naive Beatrice, until, by a quirk of fate, Beatrice is betrothed to the future Duke of Milan.

    Michael Allen says: "Good, but not Captivating"
    "Good Enough for Vacation"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A pretty good historical novel about two aristocratic sisters during the Italian Renaissance. I found all of the characters rather one-dimensional, but the descriptions of life during wartime for the Borgia-Pope era ruling class was pretty and evocative.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • #GIRLBOSS: How to Write Your Own Rules While Turning Heads and Turning Profits

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Sophia Amoruso
    • Narrated By Sara Jes Austell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (303)
    Performance
    (286)
    Story
    (286)

    The first thing Sophia Amoruso sold online wasn’t fashion - it was a stolen book. She spent her teens hitchhiking, committing petty theft, and dumpster diving. By twenty-two, she had resigned herself to employment, but was still broke, directionless, and working a mediocre day job she’d taken for the health insurance. It was there that Sophia decided to start selling vintage clothes on eBay. Eight years later, she is the founder, CEO, and creative director of Nasty Gal, a $100 million plus online fashion retailer with more than 350 employees.

    Margaret says: "Red Bull to Sandberg's Skinny Vanilla Latte"
    "Red Bull to Sandberg's Skinny Vanilla Latte"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book is the Lean In for the Millenial Generation - fresh, bright, gritty, pragmatic, and fun. No less important than Lean In, and I bet Amouruso and Sandberg aren't too far apart in age - but worlds apart in perspective. Work ethic is the same. Women working their asses off, getting shit done.

    Better narrator than Lean In, as well. No whining.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Detroit: An American Autopsy

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Charlie LeDuff
    • Narrated By Eric Martin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (295)
    Performance
    (266)
    Story
    (268)

    In the heart of America, a metropolis is quietly destroying itself. Detroit, once the richest city in the nation, is now its poorest. Once the vanguard of America’s machine age - mass production, automobiles, and blue-collar jobs - Detroit is now America’s capital for unemployment, illiteracy, foreclosure, and dropouts. With the steel-eyed reportage that has become his trademark and the righteous indignation that only a native son can possess, journalist Charlie LeDuff sets out to uncover what has brought low this once-vibrant city, his city.

    Stacee says: "Great performance, squandered opportunity"
    "Testosterone-driven prose about an American icon"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Charlie LeDuff is very, very mad. He is mad about the murder/death/disintegration of his hometown of Detroit, and he tells the gritty story of what it's like for many who still live there. Some may find his prose rather purple - I found it energized, driving - pretty full of testosterone, but the subject-matter deserved it. Firefighters losing their lives fighting chronic abandoned house fires in outdated gear that doesn't work? People living in half-populated neighborhoods where their homes aren't worth as much as their cars? Gobsmacking corruption of public officials?

    I've met some of the activists and revitalize-rs who are bringing pieces of the Big D back. People like Reverend Joan Ross, who ran a nightclub before she was ordained and is now fighting to bring solar-powered street lights into the neighborhoods Detroit has taken off the grid so kids don't have to walk home from school in pitch black conditions in the winter. People like Jacob Corvidae at the WARM Training Center, who is working every day to build a cleaner, greener economy. If you visit Detroit, you come away believing that this is a city worth fighting for.

    Charlie LeDuff focuses mostly on very negative aspects of the city - but somehow his energy and anger also make you believe that the city is worth fighting for, for its own sake, for the people who live there, and as a symbol of American recovery.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Secret History

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Donna Tartt
    • Narrated By Donna Tartt
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1093)
    Performance
    (796)
    Story
    (787)

    The snow in the mountains was melting and Bunny had been dead for several weeks before we came to understand the gravity of our situation.

    KP says: "Read this, don't listen"
    "Flawed But Compelling; Ain't No Goldfinch"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Donna Tartt certainly demonstrates her genius potential in this first novel. I read The Goldfinch before I read the Secret History, and the early themes and signs are there:

    -the writing, of course - Tartt is a master craftsman of lyrical sentences. This woman can WRITE.

    -the still, quiet plotcraft - the plots don't seem to be moving forward, until they do and you're suddenly in a very new place

    -the characters who live deeply confined within academic frameworks of obscure humanities disciplines - not very relevant in the real world but strangely compelling

    -the amoral characters, who you end up rooting for in some strange way - although many of the Secret History characters were less sympathetic than the Goldfinch protagonists (probably because their complete self-absorption and lack of any kind of empathy for others - even each other - became repellent after a while)

    -the drug and alcohol abuse at staggering levels

    -perfectly-drawn anti-hero characters you want to see more of on every page (Bunny in this book; Boris in The Goldfinch)

    There are serious flaws, though. Tartt's main characters are bound together by esoteric studies, but only one of them (Henry) demonstrates any passion for the subjects. They are bound together by being children of great class privilege (or aspirations to that class), but there really isn't any love demonstrated between them (even though Tartt assures us that some of them love each other.) The kindest, most redeeming character (Francis) is the least well-drawn.

    I found Tartt's descriptions of the way the main characters lived unrealistic. She carefully draws a perfect portrait of a small, New England liberal arts college (I attended one during the same time period that Tartt was at Bennington - the descriptions are spot-on, down to the town-and-gown divisions and spoiled, irrelevant professors), yet her characters don't seem to own a single college-logo hoodie, pair of jeans, electric typewriter, or even a ballpoint pen. All the boy protagonists run around in suits and ties - complete nonsense. They are all deathly afraid of working, although most people I knew in the same social class had jobs and internships galore during summers, trust funds or no. I was also surprised about the amount of weekday casual drug use she describes (rather than weekend recreational), and how she portrayed so many of the non-central fellow students as complete imbeciles, which Bennington surely does not attract.

    This book is compelling, in an academic, crafted way. The Goldfinch is much better.

    Tartt narrates this one herself, which bothers some who've reviewed it. I liked listening to her. She's a strong and dramatic reader, and one can forgive her Mississippi accent breaking through sometimes. Her deadpan, ennui-filled voice is perfect for Richard and Henry's perspectives as well as for their snobbery and self-absorption.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Splendid Things We Planned: A Family Portrait

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Blake Bailey
    • Narrated By Jim Meskimen
    Overall
    (17)
    Performance
    (14)
    Story
    (13)

    Meet the Baileys: Burck, a prosperous lawyer once voted the American Legion's "Citizen of the Year" in his tiny hometown of Vinita, Oklahoma; his wife Marlies, who longs to recapture her festive life in Greenwich Village as a pretty young German immigrant, fresh off the boat; their addled son Scott, who repeatedly crashes the family Porsche; and Blake, the younger son, trying to find a way through the storm. "You're gonna be just like me," a drunken Scott taunts him. "You're gonna be worse."

    Diana says: "Beautifully written; incredibly sad"
    "Well-written but sorry I read it."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a difficult book to rate - it is written extremely well, but does not provide the same satisfaction of most masterfully-written memoirs, which shed light on the author's development as a result of what they experience in the memoir. This book is just a very honest, well-written portrayal of Bailey's brother's 30+ year descent into mental illness, and the daily assault on the family as a result. Nobody gets better, and we don't see any development of any of the family members as a result of the unrolling of the brother's life. In the end, I was just depressed and numb - I suppose reflecting how the family felt - but it is not why we read books, and if I were someone experiencing similar circumstances, there would be no help here for me.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Sheryl Sandberg
    • Narrated By Elisa Donovan
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2718)
    Performance
    (2393)
    Story
    (2406)

    Sheryl Sandberg - Facebook COO, ranked eighth on Fortune's list of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Business - has become one of America's most galvanizing leaders, and an icon for millions of women juggling work and family. In Lean In, she urges women to take risks and seek new challenges, to find work that they love, and to remain passionately engaged with it at the highest levels throughout their lives.

    Claudia says: "Make your life count - no matter what you do"
    "An important but flawed book. Narrator unpleasant."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book holds some important truths about American women in leadership and the challenges of career focus. Sandberg's courage in sharing her own insecurities and challenges is sometimes empowering and sometimes just the reader being held hostage during a Sandberg therapy session, but overall her intentions and her commitment to women's success shines through. In the main, I'm glad she wrote it - she started a national conversation that is now a genie out of the bottle and unlikely to go back in. But it will be important to hear from other women with less privelege, perhaps that don't want to have children, and from men who support these women.

    On the writing - Sandberg is clear and crisp, but she is not a powerful storyteller - you can tell she's a good driver of processes but not in marketing.

    On the narrator - a very annoying, nasal voice and the woman sounds high-pitched and young - pretty unpleasant at times.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.