You no longer follow Marc

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Marc

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Marc

ratings
11
REVIEWS
11
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
15

  • Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills

    • ORIGINAL (12 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Steven Novella
    Overall
    (926)
    Performance
    (837)
    Story
    (821)

    No skill is more important in today's world than being able to think about, understand, and act on information in an effective and responsible way. What's more, at no point in human history have we had access to so much information, with such relative ease, as we do in the 21st century. But because misinformation out there has increased as well, critical thinking is more important than ever. These 24 rewarding lectures equip you with the knowledge and techniques you need to become a savvier, sharper critical thinker in your professional and personal life.

    K-Rock says: "Common sense guide to skepticism"
    "well worth the time to listen to, good roundup"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills?

    Most of the facts and ideas presented in this course are well known to everyone who has read a bit about or heard from modern "mind science" or "how our brain works" talks. Yet, Novella's roundup is great to listen to, well paced, always interesting and well worth both time and energy spent.
    I really enjoyed, for once, a scientist to remind the listener that he, the scientist, does not know it all and will probably not be right all the time. For one time a tutor explains, in detail, that using your own brain and mind means to check the facts and not just play along. A fair approach.


    What other book might you compare Your Deceptive Mind: A Scientific Guide to Critical Thinking Skills to and why?

    M. Shermer's "The Believing Brain" is quite similar in general approach, but concentrates too much on personal vendetta of the author and/or believe system. There are more comparable titles, but most, in my eyes (ears), suffer from the same basic problem: Scientists that want to make you BELIEVE that they do not need to believe, because they know all the facts for fact, are ... wretched(?).
    Most comparable books start of with or repeat sentences like "well, we know for a fact that ..." - and that, exactly, is not scientific thinking. It's religion.
    Novella does not fall for this.


    What does Professor Steven Novella bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Most books that cover the same topic come up with the ever repeating "experiments" that "scientists" have done, some of which date back to the 1930s or whatever. These experiments as well as the conclusions drawn from them are not that convincing, in setup, target and evidence. Yet, "science" seems unable to come up with new studies, new experiments and new approaches, so most books chew through the same data over and over again, almost in religious circles.
    Novella gets around this quite well by just shortly pointing towards those experiments, but explaining thought processes and prejudices in more "today's" contexts, seemingly being still in contact with the real world and not lost in "scientist's drinking clubs". His narration, wit, pointyness (does that word exist?) and personal involvement make you believe he actually means what he says, yet has the distance to always remember you: He might be wrong.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    There are a few "funny" side notes that are funny enough to make you giggle or even laugh for a moment, but overall the pace (30 minute lectures) and dedication is just about right to not NEED jokes or horror stories.


    Any additional comments?

    Can you expect "new insights"? No, if you have ever read anything about modern brain science or mind theory. Are you looking for a sumup of the current "believe" in why we believe and how we err in making up our minds: This is a great approach that won't even harm a religious listener (and those are often the targets of pity for so many other authors/teachers).
    Not that I am of that kind anyway :-)

    12 of 12 people found this review helpful
  • Still Foolin' 'Em: Where I've Been, Where I'm Going, and Where the Hell Are My Keys

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Billy Crystal
    • Narrated By Billy Crystal
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1802)
    Performance
    (1643)
    Story
    (1637)

    Billy Crystal is 65, and he's not happy about it. With his trademark wit and heart, he outlines the absurdities and challenges that come with growing old, from insomnia to memory loss to leaving dinners with half your meal on your shirt. In humorous chapters like ""Buying the Plot"" and ""Nodding Off,"" Crystal not only catalogues his physical gripes, but offers a road map to his 77 million fellow baby boomers who are arriving at this milestone age with him. He also looks back at the most powerful and memorable moments of his long and storied life, from entertaining his relatives as a kid in Long Beach, Long Island, and his years doing stand-up in the Village, up through his legendary stint at Saturday Night Live, When Harry Met Sally, and his long run as host of the Academy Awards. Listeners get a front-row seat to his one-day career with the New York Yankees (he was the first player to ever ""test positive for Maalox""), his love affair with Sophia Loren, and his enduring friendships with several of his idols, including Mickey Mantle and Muhammad Ali. He lends a light touch to more serious topics like religion (""the aging friends I know have turned to the Holy Trinity: Advil, bourbon, and Prozac""); grandparenting; and, of course, dentistry. As wise and poignant as they are funny, Crystal's reflections are an unforgettable look at an extraordinary life well lived.

    Pamela J says: "Growing up with Billy Crystal"
    "Don't feel guilty, Mr. Crystal, not your fault"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about Still Foolin' 'Em? What did you like least?

    My headline above should make sense if you read or listened to this book/performance. Mr. Crystal gives some good performances (and some not so great), demonstrating what his success is based on. The live performance parts indeed are the better ones, the studio-read ones ... not so much (and the changing quality of recording at times is distracting).

    But.

    A good book lives on a a good story. You may think that what better story could there be than the life of the author telling it himself? Unfortunately Mr. Crystal cannot make up his mind whether to bring up an anecdote to present a punch line OR to tell you something about himself, his life, "where he's been and where he's going to". When in doubt, he'll always choose the laugh.
    That may be what his FANs are after.
    I personally love the films I saw him working in, so I admire Mr. Crystal's work. I see how great he is as a stand up comedian. I get a glimpse of how he may be as a family man (although this somehow slips through my fingers in this book). But what do I REMEMBER of the story after I finished listening to the book?
    Not much. In fact, I only remember a few good one liners.

    For a biography that isn't enough, be it presented as congenially as it is.


    If you’ve listened to books by Billy Crystal before, how does this one compare?

    I would actually like to listen to Mr. Crystal reading good books that tell a great story. Are there any? Please let me know.


    What about Billy Crystal’s performance did you like?

    As I said above: Mr. Crystal is a great stand up comedian. So the life performances recorded here live and breath, his interaction with the audience, the TIMING you get there, are just great.


    If this book were a movie would you go see it?

    Well, if Mr. Crystal was plaid by, let's say, Mr. Crystal, I surely would love to see a move starring Mr. Crystal performing as Mr. Crystal. I fear it would need a good screen writer to work at the dramatics :)


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Story of Human Language

    • ORIGINAL (18 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By The Great Courses, John McWhorter
    • Narrated By Professor John McWhorter
    Overall
    (254)
    Performance
    (235)
    Story
    (232)

    Language defines us as a species, placing humans head and shoulders above even the most proficient animal communicators. But it also beguiles us with its endless mysteries, allowing us to ponder why different languages emerged, why there isn't simply a single language, how languages change over time and whether that's good or bad, and how languages die out and become extinct.

    Saud says: "You'll Never Look at Languages the Same Way Again"
    "Theories on language development (+ dog tortures)"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about The Story of Human Language? What did you like least?

    The good thing about Great-Courses audio versions is that most of the tutors are able to show their own enthusiasm about the topic they talk about. This is true for this course as well, for sure Mr. McWhorter loves his theories and his perspective on the history of language.
    There is a lot I would discuss in depth in terms of "believability" (or call it "proof") when Mr. McWhorter just states that something "is". Where other scientists understand that seeing flaws in a theory or simply expressing doubts, these lectures have a touch of "religion" to them. I really missed the more open minded approach of other Great-Courses I listened to.

    Performance-wise I have had some problems following the narration. This is the first course that made me wish that the next break would come so that I could CONCENTRATE on something. Mr. McWhorter loves to stray from a line of thoughts (many times just in order to laugh about jokes on torturing dogs, which he finds quite funny - being a "cat person") and the way the lectures have been recorded (with him obviously just loosely following notes and vividly interacting with an audience) were distracting me. There are some sound issues when Mr. McWhorter turned his mouth away from the mike, but these weren't that hard to ignore.

    What was talked about (and I said I would like to DISCUSS rather than just "believe") basically is the "standard introduction" into the one-language-theory (that has never really convinced me and this course didn't succeed in doing so either). "How have different language evolved", "why do languages change", "how can we trace back languages to common ancestors". I don't think there was much missing from the "rough overview" and Mr. McWhorter had quite some anecdotes to tell (although his humor isn't mine, so he had to laugh on his jokes without me - that's ok). But anyone having read anything about language history won't find much "new" in here.
    Other "Great Courses" did better in giving glimpses of "there is more to this, if you liked this, you might want to look into ..."


    Would you be willing to try another book from The Great Courses and John McWhorter ? Why or why not?

    I love The Great Courses, but I doubt that I would like to passively listen to another McWhorter-Lecture. I would rather have a good cup of coffee with him and talk about some of the principles of his language-religion :-D


    What three words best describe Professor John McWhorter’s voice?

    vivid, understandable, friendly


    Was The Story of Human Language worth the listening time?

    As said above: If you have never ever heard anything about how language develops and changes (and dies), this is a GOOD overview (just don't think that those linguists have the final knowledge - they just pretend). If you actively read newspapers, magazines and have a somewhat normal connection to the world you live in (and didn't sleep all the time in history at school) the bits of this course that are "new" are some anecdotes, semi-funny incidents with dogs being kicked from a ship and the repeated fact that a 38years-old man (this course is VERY old, it must have been recorded in 2003/2004) cannot tell a 1-year old child from a 9-year old one (and finds that quite normal).
    Sorry - Mr. McWhorter started that, I am just quoting.


    Any additional comments?

    It is STILL worth the money, because WHAT is told is interesting, good to know and MAY help understanding people better.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • How to Listen to and Understand Great Music, 3rd Edition

    • ORIGINAL (36 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Robert Greenberg
    Overall
    (393)
    Performance
    (354)
    Story
    (347)

    Great music is a language unto its own, a means of communication of unmatched beauty and genius. And it has an undeniable power to move us in ways that enrich our lives-provided it is understood.If you have ever longed to appreciate great concert music, to learn its glorious language and share in its sublime pleasures, the way is now open to you, through this series of 48 wonderful lectures designed to make music accessible to everyone who yearns to know it, regardless of prior training or knowledge.

    Lee the reader says: "Wonderful, I've wanted this for so long...but..."
    "Yes. Do. Listen. To. This! But get some Baldrian."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    If you could sum up How to Listen to and Understand Great Music, 3rd Edition in three words, what would they be?

    That's great music?

    (does that count as three?)

    When I was a very young being (yes, before the war ...) I was convinced that, one day, within the span of my lifetime, I would be able to understand why "that guy in the orchestra is threatening the girl with a stick - and if he is not, why the heck she doesn't stop screaming".

    This course has fulfilled one of my great wishes: To understand what some people consider "great" with that "old" music. For this I am grateful. Really, deeply, honestly grateful. I found an approach to Mozart (and more important composers) that I would not have considered possible (since I don't find Mozart's music that impressive - although I LOVE orchestral music).

    What I still do not get is: Why this music types should be considered "greater" than any (and I mean: ANY) other type of professionally composed, orchestrated, conducted and played music. While I do "understand" now, what some people find interesting in Mozart, Wagner(?!) or Schönberg, the examples provided in the course weren't able to demonstrate the "greatness" of the music (or their composers) to me. Sorry. I like some stuff of it, I dislike others - but I frankly don't care if it is "great" music or just "good" music, if it tells me something and moves me.

    Ok: Just take "great" out of the title and this course is a "no-brainer" (how strange that expression seems ...). Get it. Listen to it. I did - I did not skip a singe minute.


    Would you recommend How to Listen to and Understand Great Music, 3rd Edition to your friends? Why or why not?

    I would, can and already have done several times: Recommend this course to ANYONE who feels even the slightest interest in "understanding that kind of music". The course is approachable, understandable, moving, pulls you with it, gives ideas and inspirations for "further listening" and, not the least point, each lecture ends before it gets too hard to keep up with the enthusiasm of Prof. Greenberg!


    Which scene was your favorite?

    I really loved the ideas about how Mozart might have reacted to later music compositions, although I somewhat doubt he would have done it the way presented here. Still, the idea of how he might have felt is very believable.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    The sheer length of the course doesn't make listening to it in one "tour de force" unlikely. Besides, you need time to think through, iterate over and "try out" what you heard. You have to listen to different (in many cases: better) recordings of the music excerpts presented.
    This book is for people interested in the matter - not for people wanting to get "smart" by listening to a course and "be done".


    Any additional comments?

    A complex course and shortened overview over such a huge matter as it is presented in this course cries for discussion. There are many, many things that I can not agree on with Prof. Greenberg (having some historical education myself). Examples would be the role the (Christian) Church has played according to Mr. Greenberg in regards to preserving art (his point of view) instead of actively destroying it or concentrating it on a minimalistic "mainstream" (mine).
    A point that Prof. Greenberg seems to love is "musical typology is driven by spoken language", which does make sense to some extend. The examples of (German) spoken language he presents don't resemble typical "German" to me, though. One could be mean and counter with "Well, if what Prof. Greenberg says is true, then typical contemporary American music must be ugly, arhythmic, stuttering - because that is the way that I speak American". German does have variations (dialects) and even sub-types. German has not been the "language of art" through all centuries, so basing musical typology on "German" as an American speaks it today is irritating at best.

    Sure - nitpicking I am. These are just examples of topics I would like to discuss, which, unfortunately, does not work in a one-way-communication like this course. There are many hickups begging to be pointed out, yet, none of these render the course any less worthy.

    Get it. Listen to it. Open up a world you did not think interesting or worth examining ever before!

    (Well, if you DID understand classic, romantic and whatsnotic music before, you probably bought the course for the fun of being doped with ecstasy for the topic by the tutor, didn't you?)

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Moral Animal: Why We Are the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Robert Wright
    • Narrated By Greg Thornton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (501)
    Performance
    (358)
    Story
    (363)

    Are men literally born to cheat? Does monogamy actually serve women's interests? These are among the questions that have made The Moral Animal one of the most provocative science books in recent years. Wright unveils the genetic strategies behind everything from our sexual preferences to our office politics - as well as their implications for our moral codes and public policies.

    Darwin8u says: "A Masterpiece of Science Writing"
    "Honest, concise, entertaining view on evolution th"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    This is one of the very few books that take an honest, self-critic point of view on what the Darwin (or Wallace!) theory of evolution puts on the table to explain human (and animal) behavior. By doing so it offers some revealing and quite intriguing ideas about why we love, why we hate and why, the heck, that guy over there is getting away with my coffee.

    Other than religiously colored books - which includes the "New Atheists" pamphlets with their own religion-like uberpowered self-confidence - the author takes a step back and tries to keep perspective: He knows that he is presenting theories and theories can be wrong. He takes the SCIENCE approach by trying to falsify claims, looking for gaps in arguments - and in this brings the matter to the reader/listener in a much more comprehensible way than any "I know what I am talking about, just listen, you dumb-ass"-book.

    Aside from that the books has humor. You have to have some background knowledge to get every joke the author makes, but it _is_ funny.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Moral Animal?

    For me there wasn't a climax, a most memorable moment (mmm), but the whole idea of being able to EXPLAIN emotional behavior and still accepting and even appreciating it (like "love") is something not that easily achievable by a completely scientific view on the emotional world.
    Yes, this book does offer an idea of a religion-free common base for moral. Yet, that approach may not be acceptable to all humans, as it does not place humans at the top of the "moral landscape". In fact, it does not place humans on any top anywhere. It puts us back into a place where we belong. THAT may be an unwanted feeling for some.


    What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

    Unfortunately the reading performance was quite distracting. At times it seemed like the narrator was completely uninterested in what he was reading, as if he just read it from paper and be done with it (which probably was the case). I had to speed playback up to 1.25 or even 1.5 to get SOME dramatic tone into it and not fall asleep (I am listening to audio books when taking my daily walk).
    There are some narrative "gags" in the book which Mr Thornton (the voice actor) didn't seem to get.
    I was tempted to give the performance a 1 star rating, but that would have been unfair. He still did a good job by speaking very clearly, perfectly understandably, easy to follow.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    The content COULD have been stripped down to a 2-hour session without loosing too much of its information. But since the author follows Darwin's life and takes this as an example to illustrate evolution theory, he would have had to delete most of the "aha moments", which make this book so worthwhile.
    So, no, I prefer listening to books like this in turns, even with other books in alternation.


    Any additional comments?

    I hope that what I was able to say what I wanted to in the comments above. This book really is worth some time of your life, either in printed form or as an audio book. One of the very few books I would actually recommend to people. And that's for the upright, honest and fair point of view taken in it, the acceptance of even the most weird (religious or not) perspective as "human" and "understandable" and even explaining why that is.

    Let me put it this way: If someone is able to explain to the point what LOVE is and how it works and leaves you still being able and even wanting to love afterwards, he did a good job.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Up Till Now: The Autobiography

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By William Shatner, David Fisher
    • Narrated By William Shatner
    Overall
    (320)
    Performance
    (280)
    Story
    (280)

    This is the story of William Shatner’s half-century career and private life. It will take listeners from the streets of Montreal to regional theater and describe his early TV work and movies. It also includes stories from four series he's starred in, including T.J. Hooker, Rescue 911, Boston Legal, and, of course, Star Trek.

    Tonja Shelton says: "Outstanding narration"
    "Understanding the Shatman - unexpectedly"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you consider the audio edition of Up Till Now to be better than the print version?

    I haven't read the print edition (otherwise I obviously wouldn't have bought the audio edition), so I cannot compare them. Yet, I believe that I would not have had the issues with the print version that I had with the audio version, so ... maybe I'd preferred the printed book. Again.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Up Till Now?

    What I did not expect from a collection of anecdotes (a "biography" in my understanding would be a bit more "to the point", not just jumping from story to story) is this: I hear a lot of people getting all emotional about whether they hate or adore Mr. Shatner. I never understood this, as for me he was always "just an actor", I never bothered to know anything personal about him. I found it quite nice to see, that to Mr. Shatner Mr. Shatner actually is "just an actor" and that he, Mr. Shatner, never bothered to have the audience know anything personal about him.
    After listening to his - subjective, biased and in many occasions obviously not "well thought through" - stories I kind of sympathize with the man. Both the actor and the human being. It seems that some people expect "role model qualities" from someone, who, at the end of the day, always wanted to be "just an actor".


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    Actually I found the narration the most irritating part of the book. Sure, Shatner has a nice voice to listen to, is easy to follow - but the production allowed him to drop into mumbling and get away with far too many "volume issues" that my listening experience wasn't very positive. More often than not I found it hard to understand his "into the beard"-passages, which, for an audio book you listen to while walking the woods, isn't that cool.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    There's too much jumping from story to story, too much sidekicks, too many "thought-to-be-funny" self-advertisements (I believe those are meant as a running gag, performed in the "Shatner wit" of humor) to listen to the narration for more than 1-2 hours in a sitting. That's for me, naturally. I guess, if you are a ShatFanBoy, you probably would consider this point of view invalid.


    Any additional comments?

    I sometimes think that audio book productions should consider "famous" narrators less god-like (which turns out into letting them "perform" the reading no matter of that performance fits the purpose of the production). Sometimes those "celebrities" are JUST ACTORS and need someone to guide them through a performance, asking them to "speak clearly" and "could you do that part again".
    Sure. Fans want to have all the "funny bits". But funny bits can be handled in ways that make them fun for (nearly) everyone, if production treats actors as actors, not as "he knows what he's doin'"-wonders.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • What Einstein Told His Cook: Kitchen Science Explained

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By Robert L. Wolke
    • Narrated By Sean Runnette
    Overall
    (931)
    Performance
    (780)
    Story
    (775)

    Why is red meat red? How do they decaffeinate coffee? Do you wish you understood the science of food but don't want to plow through dry, technical books? In What Einstein Told His Cook, University of Pittsburgh chemistry professor emeritus and award-winning Washington Post food columnist Robert L. Wolke provides reliable and witty explanations for your most burning food questions, while debunking misconceptions and helping you interpret confusing advertising and labeling.

    Jared says: "Cooking + Basic Chemistry/Science = Great Book"
    "worth listening to: A reminder that we buy BS"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you consider the audio edition of What Einstein Told His Cook to be better than the print version?

    I haven't read the print version, so I am not able to compare.


    What did you like best about this story?

    Wolke does not hide that he falls for sales pitches himself and has to remind himself of simple things from time to time - like salt being generally SALT, not some magic powder that can solve problems or sugar being everywhere, often in disguise ...


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I am a skeptic food buyer, trying to prepare as much as possible on his own, not relying on "convenience food" from the super market. Yet, this book has reminded me to be even more open eyed ...


    Any additional comments?

    The book consists of several, not necessarily connected, articles or columns that deal with separate topics. This makes it a good mix of various topics, but lacks a bit of a "red line".

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Believing Brain: From Ghosts and Gods to Politics and Conspiracies - How We Construct Beliefs and Reinforce Them as Truths

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Michael Shermer
    • Narrated By Michael Shermer
    Overall
    (798)
    Performance
    (577)
    Story
    (574)

    In this, his magnum opus, the world’s best known skeptic and critical thinker Dr. Michael Shermer—founding publisher of Skeptic magazine and perennial monthly columnist (“Skeptic”) for Scientific American—presents his comprehensive theory on how beliefs are born, formed, nourished, reinforced, challenged, changed, and extinguished.

    Leigh says: "Great material. Not-so-great narration."
    "Nice, pointed, rather personally biased "old wine""
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about The Believing Brain? What did you like least?

    Shermer's approach obviously is personal. While during the first half of the book he sums up current brain science/mind theory's point of view quite fascinatingly, in the second half he more or less concentrates on a "kind of vendetta" against personal critics towards his person or position.
    So five stars for about 50-60 percent of the book, 2 stars for the rest. I would rate it four stars, but Shemer only repeats the same old experiments and studies that have been ridden to death by so many other books, articles and discussions before, without bringing anything new to the table, that - even though his performance, his to-the-point style are great to listen to and "do make you think" (if you didn't do so before) - in the end you ask yourself: What's new about it? That's all kind of all day knowledge for an educated grown up.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    I guess this book has been wrongly categorized by Audible, since there is no "character" (except, maybe, for some "Gods" that ever now and then pop up and whom I find to be quite silly).


    What about Michael Shermer’s performance did you like?

    Shermer's performance is good, professional and convincing. If he had left out all those pokes towards his personal issues with readers or colleagues in the "scientific" community, it might have been great.


    Did The Believing Brain inspire you to do anything?

    I am not going to believe in that any scientist who calls himself a scientist knows ANYTHING for sure. Shermer wants me to believe he does, but this book is a good base for being a skeptic :-)


    Any additional comments?

    There are quite a lot of passages that make you go "huh?". It really isn't of much interest to an European reader/listener, what the American politics system looks like, but if the author insists in this (the US system) being the ONLY ONE in the world, it's quite funny to listen to. You even laugh out loud when the author explains that you just cannot take anything for granted that other people just tell you, and in the next sentence states "this and that, of course, is a fact that everyone knows".
    In general you get the most out of this book by listen closely and finding all the moments in which the author directly contradicts himself.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Write Songs Right Now

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Alex Forbes
    • Narrated By Alex Forbes
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (16)
    Performance
    (13)
    Story
    (13)

    Write Songs Right Now is a hands-on, step-by-step guide to creating original pop songs - an approach that been road-tested by thousands of Alex's students and coaching clients in New York City, some of whom have gone on to achieve great success. With insight, enthusiasm, and humor, Alex guides listeners through the process of brainstorming for ideas, crafting effective lyrics, and putting those lyrics to music.

    Marc says: "Kind of old wine in new skins, still good for that"
    "Kind of old wine in new skins, still good for that"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

    I used to fall asleep to this audiobook, since the narrator seems to simply read the text from sheets, repeating the same intonation over and over again (may be, but not necessarily, due to the nature of pop songs that repeat themselves over and over again?). While on some pages she seemed to be alone at home, calling out her words to the mike, in other times she seemed to have to keep quiet to not wake up the kids.
    Well, I found out the Audible player could speed up playback. 1.25 speed made listening not so dry.
    As for content: There's nothing new in here, everyone who ever read or heard about creative writing or anything the like knows all there is in this book (and considerably more, I bet). Also, the perspective is rather limited to mainstream music, mainstream business, mainstream genres, mainstream production and mainstream "how to". Legal advice is applicable to US listeners only, although, with a bit of brain, you can "translate" what little help on rights & cie is there (although it wouldn't help you much if you were, like me, German and had to suffer from the absurd German creative rights system. Ask YouTube about that).
    Ok, too many words from me already: The book is ok for the money spent (much less than for a cheap lunch), but I won't listen to it again.


    What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

    That's it? Erm, ok.


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    The book could benefit (a bit) from a professional narrator, who could bring live, color and dramatic to the content.


    Was Write Songs Right Now worth the listening time?

    If you didn't know that in order to write songs now you have to write songs now, you really should read this book (listen to it), because it basically tells you that in order to write songs now you should write songs now. And not listen to books that tell you to write songs now.


    Any additional comments?

    Sorry for being lame, I guess there are people out there who need the "kick in the butt" the author tries to give the reader/listener (but somewhat fails). I just expected a little more insight into how professionals run their job - I happen to know a few professional song writers who see their job as a 9-5 daytime business with routine, know how and creativity. 30 minutes of chatting with them gives me more than a couple of hours of "Write Songs Right Now".

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, The Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By Edward Dolnick
    • Narrated By Alan Sklar
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1064)
    Performance
    (800)
    Story
    (813)

    The Clockwork Universe is the story of a band of men who lived in a world of dirt and disease but pictured a universe that ran like a perfect machine. A meld of history and science, this book is a group portrait of some of the greatest minds who ever lived as they wrestled with natures most sweeping mysteries. The answers they uncovered still hold the key to how we understand the world.

    Alison says: "The Royal Society comes alive."
    "Good for a long evening ..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you try another book from Edward Dolnick and/or Alan Sklar?

    Having stopped listening several times because my own historical understandings differed from what Mr Dolnick tells and at other times because I just felt dizzy from the narration, I am sure that I won't buy another book from the author, but maybe a fantasy tale narrated by Mr Sklar.


    What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

    There had to be a circle back to the beginning. Somehow it felt really forced.


    Would you be willing to try another one of Alan Sklar’s performances?

    I adore Mr Sklar's educated voice, his timbre and warmth. It just is the wrong-most choice for a historical essay (like this), being much more suited for a tale of elves and orcs and sleepy hollows.


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    If you are completely unfamiliar with the world of the 16hundreds, you may get a glimpse of how science "worked" back then. If you are interested in the philosophical debates of the days or want to learn more about Newton and his time-companions - or if you want to learn anything about physics, mathematics or the likes ... get a good book.


    Any additional comments?

    It isn't BAD. It is just far too long without any "news", any well crafted narration (talking about the author, NOT the narrator), it seemed to have many small flaws in recherche and/or detail (even in the scientific departments).
    The book does make you want to look for better biographies of its subjects, though. And that is NOT the worst one can say about any book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.