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HELPFUL VOTES
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  • Down London Road

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Samantha Young
    • Narrated By Elle Newlands
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (771)
    Performance
    (712)
    Story
    (715)

    Johanna Walker is used to taking charge. But she’s about to meet someone who will make her lose control....

    It has always been up to Johanna to care for her family, particularly her younger brother, Cole. With an absent father and a useless mother, she’s been making decisions based on what’s best for Cole for as long as she can remember. She even determines what men to date by how much they can provide for her brother and her, not on whatever sparks may - or may not - fly. But with Cameron MacCabe, the attraction is undeniable....

    SIMARA says: "Magnificent!"
    "Well Developed Characters Make this Work"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I enjoyed the first book in this series, On Dublin Street, a great deal. I was impressed with the depth of the characters, the layers of problems that made the main character a complex, difficult yet compelling, woman to love. I bought Down London Road as soon as it came out, but for some reason I put off reading it. I think I put it off because the main character in Down London Road was a secondary character in On Dublin Street, and not a particularly interesting or sympathetic character at that.

    When I finally did read this book, I was very glad I did. Like On Dublin Street, it is at its core a contemporary romance. But again the depth of the character makes it much more than that. The aspects of Jo I found unsympathetic and uninteresting in On Dublin Street were explained and she suddenly became a very strong, brave and sympathetic person. I think the open animosity against her expressed by her eventual love interest made the reader defensive and protective of Jo and suddenly she was a character worth knowing. The character of her younger brother matured throughout the book and the closeness between the two main characters was portrayed realistically but felt very genuine.

    I thought the narrator did a very good job with the book.

    I highly recommend this.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Pollyanna Plan

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By Talli Roland
    • Narrated By Heather Wilds
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (15)
    Performance
    (13)
    Story
    (12)

    Thirty-something Emma Beckett has always looked down on 'the glass is half full' optimists, believing it's better to be realistic than delusional. But when she loses her high-powered job and fiancé in the same week, even Emma has difficulty keeping calm and carrying on. With her world spinning out of control, and bolstered by a challenge from her best friend, Emma makes a radical decision. From here on in, she'll behave like Pollyanna: Attempting to always see the upside, no matter how dire the situation.

    "Never Capitalized on Potential"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is one of those books that was almost very good. Not great, but it almost deserved a "very" in front of the good. What kept me from adding the "very" is a little difficult to express.

    On the one hand, the author presents two interesting central characters. Both have excessive baggage, both are trying to live a narrowly defined life that no longer works for them, both live with tragedy. And when the book focuses on the evolution of those characters it deserves the "very good". You feel the female character's painful awkwardness and the male character's fear of further rejection.

    She looses it though with the way the plot is hurried. The two characters don't have sufficient time or history to build a relationship which is born out with the impractical and unrealistic way she finally gets them together. I felt like the last quarter of the book was the most important, but got the least amount of time or attention from the author.

    One other complaint is that the male character's issues arose from a very serious health problem. I don't doubt that someone could fall in love with a person they recently met, even knowing that the person suffered from a debilitating illness with a very poor prognosis. But I do doubt that they could fall in love and totally ignore the issue. The fact that this was so lightly glossed over really bothered me.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Winthrop Woman

    • UNABRIDGED (27 hrs and 33 mins)
    • By Anya Seton
    • Narrated By Corrie James
    Overall
    (9)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (9)

    In 1631 Elizabeth Winthrop, newly widowed with an infant daughter, set sail for the New World. Against a background of rigidity and conformity she dared to befriend Anne Hutchinson at the moment of her banishment from the Massachusetts Bay Colony; dared to challenge a determined army captain bent on the massacre of her friends, the Siwanoy Indians; and, above all, dared to love a man as her heart and her whole being commanded.

    "Historical Fiction that Aged Very Well"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Anya Seton's historical fiction seems to age very well. I read Green Darkness many years ago and it remains one of my all time favorites, in my favorite genre. I listened to Katherine several years back and became impressed with Ms. Seton's talent once again.

    The Winthrop woman tells the story of Elizabeth Winthrop, the daughter-in-law/niece of John Winthrop, a strict Puritan and a founding governor of the Massachusetts Colony in the first half of the 17th Century. While Elizabeth actually existed, and due to her relationship to John Winthrop whose life was well documented, we know many of the "facts" of her life - her parentage, her move to the new world, her marriages - we don't have the knowledge of the details of her life like we do Elizabeth I or Marie Antoinette. In many ways she was a "nobody" and the details of their lives seldom survive. But somehow, in a time when women were definitely "background" and men made history, there are a few incidences in her life that stood out at the time and have survived. These set her apart from the thousands of faceless women who lived her same life.

    Ms. Seton took the few facts at hand and built a readable romance novel. If that is all it was, I would say this was an adequate book. But she then added layers of facts about the time Elizabeth lived and the larger than life historical figures she knew and created a strong work of historical fiction. She breathed life and sympathy into historical figures that are typically seen as caricatures or cardboard cutouts of real people. Especially John Winthrop. She made a man historically portrayed as cold and unlikeable, into a man with flaws who constantly doubted himself and struggled to live the life he preached. We will never know how accurate her interpretation of the man was, but by making him more human, it mad me more curious to learn more of the truth about the man. This is what elevated my overall rating of the book.

    Elizabeth Winthrop lived and survived in a critical period of history. The mere fact that she survived and thrived an adventure that most who attempted it did not, makes her worthy of remembering. The fact that as a woman of the time, she was visible and vocal enough that her name was written down and her life remembered at all, makes this book worth reading.

    The narrator did an excellent job.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Shifting Dreams

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Elizabeth Hunter
    • Narrated By Liisa Ivary
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    Somedays Jena Crowe just can't get a break. Work at her diner never ends, her two boys are bundles of energy, and she's pretty sure her oldest is about to shift into something furry or feathery. Added to that, changes seem to be coming to the tiny town of Cambio Springs, big changes that not everyone in the isolated town of shapeshifters is thrilled about. Caleb Gilbert was looking for change, and the quiet desert town seemed just the ticket for a more peaceful life.

    Lulu says: "Once Again, Hunter's UniqueTalent Shines"
    "Once Again, Hunter's UniqueTalent Shines"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It is difficult for me to be objective about Elizabeth Hunter's books. I am not a huge fan of her primary genre - sci-fi fantasy. But the genre is the last thing I am thinking about when I am buried in the midst of one of her books. I can become so engrossed and wrapped up in them, it is difficult for me to point to the one thing that sets her books apart. Her characters are always well developed and sympathetic (even the bad guys), her plot is logically laid out, but not overly predictable, her prose flows smoothly and her books are always well-edited.

    Shifting Dreams was no exception. I read this in ebook format several months ago, before it became available on Audible. I was so impressed with her Elemental World series I wanted to read everything she had ever written. I liked it so much the first time I was eager to listen to it as soon as the audiobook was available. The plot revolves around a quirky little southwestern town with a "magical" spring - drinking from it gives some people and their offspring the ability to shape-shift. Rather than focusing on the mechanics of how that actually works, she focuses on the inter-relationships in a town that is full of eccentric and unique characters, with the least of their eccentricities being the ability to shift into another creature. And by allowing her characters to shift into several different species, many of which don't co-exist well in the wild, she adds another layer of complexity to the inter-relationship difficulties. She doesn't capitalize on this aspect too much in the first book, but seems to be laying a foundation.

    The characters at the center of the story are sympathetic, each coming to the relationship slightly damaged with considerable baggage. The kids weren't too cute or too annoying, but seemed pretty realistic - at least as realistic as the plot would allow.

    The narrator did a good job. My only criticism is that she wasn't Dina Pearlman. Just like the voice of Molly Harper will always be Amanda Ronconi to my ears, Elizabeth Hunter now speaks to me in Dina Pearlman's voice.

    There are a couple of ebook novellas that provide some background to the series that I recommend reading. If they become audiobooks, I will reread them. The sequel to Shifting Dreams is now out in ebook format. I am going to try to wait until it is in audio format to listen to it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Spanish Bride

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Georgette Heyer
    • Narrated By David Collins
    Overall
    (10)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (9)

    When Brigade-Major Harry Smith met the beautiful Juana María, an instant spark formed between the two fiery, energetic souls. The two fell deeply in love with one another from the first moment and the Spanish bride accompanied him throughout all his campaigns, where she rode freely among the troops. The intensity of their marriage is made all the more gripping as it is played out against the Peninsular War of Napoleon versus Wellington.

    Lulu says: "Reliable Historical Fiction Heavy on Facts"
    "Reliable Historical Fiction Heavy on Facts"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I knew going in that this was not a light Regency like so many of Heyer's best books. But I found Heyer's account of the Battle of Waterloo in An Infamous Army not only entertaining but educational, so thought I would give this a try as well. And if you like your historical fiction heavy on history and light on plot, you will like this book.

    Interestingly, unlike An Infamous Army, where the main characters were fictional but surrounded by real historical figures, in this book, even the main characters were real people. And it sounds like they were fascinating people, or at least they led a fascinating life together. Sir Harry Smith seems to be a real life Forest Gump or Zelig. He somehow managed to be on every continent and just in time to be in every major battle over the course of 30 years. He must have spent half his life on ships. And while I am sure Heyer embellished Lady Smith's character somewhat, the fact that she was a 14 year old war orphan just out of a Spanish convent when she met and married Harry Smith, that she followed Harry throughout his soldier's career and that there are so many towns named after her in Africa makes her a fascinating creature.

    It gets a little dry as we slog through battle after battle in Portugal, Spain and France during the Peninsula war, but Heyer infused the journey with humor and graphic descriptions of the conditions.

    I did not enjoy this as much as my favorite Heyer novels, but I found it very readable. I recommend.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Lost Recipe for Happiness

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Barbara O'Neal
    • Narrated By Bernadette Dunne
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (55)
    Performance
    (29)
    Story
    (30)

    It's the opportunity Elena Alvarez has been waiting for; the challenge of running her own kitchen in a world-class restaurant. Haunted by an accident of which she was the lone survivor, Elena knows better than anyone how to defy the odds. With her faithful dog, Alvin, and her grandmother's recipes, Elena arrives in Colorado to find a restaurant in as desperate need of a fresh start as she is and a man whose passionate approach to food and life rivals her own.

    Regina says: "Dealing with Guilt is a very hard road"
    "Engaging Story of Damaged Soul"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Barbara O'Neal (Samuel) does a great job of telling relate-able stories of women with very damaged souls. All of her heroines are sympathetic and Elena Alverez may be her most damaged, both physically and emotionally.

    There is definitely a romantic aspect to this story and it takes up quite a bit of the book. But all of her relationships are important and we learn as much about Elena and her demons from her relationships with her co-workers and friends as we do from her relationship with the man she ultimately falls in love with. One of the aspects about Elena that made her seem more human to me was her coldness to an old friend who disappointed her. It was an unattractive quality that made her more endearing.

    By making these secondary relationships important, the author needs to make the secondary characters interesting in their own right. She does that in this book.

    There are always animals in this author's books and they usually play a very important part. I think the dog in this book, probably the most empathetic dog ever, is my favorite. There is also always just a little bit of magic in her books. Not enough to make them too silly. That aspect of the book was handled well. Finally this book, like most of her books , also addresses subjects of importance to the people who live and work in this part of the country. She is sympathetic to both the native and imported ethnic groups that co-exist in this part of the country.

    The narration was perfect. I highly recommend this book.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • A Piece of Heaven

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Barbara Samuel
    • Narrated By Bernadette Dunne
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (14)
    Performance
    (6)
    Story
    (6)

    In the sun-baked hills of New Mexico, Luna McGraw has lived a lifetime of regrets, struggling to conquer the demons that destroyed her marriage and caused her to lose custody of her beloved daughter. But as Luna fights to rebuild a relationship with the troubled teenager, she remains haunted by images of her own childhood and the father she barely knew.

    Lulu says: "Very Enjoyable Book, Excellent Narration"
    "Very Enjoyable Book, Excellent Narration"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    First let me say that Barbara Samuel places most of her books in the same part of the country as this - New Mexico or Colorado and it is evident that she knows the area and the different ethnic groups native to the area very well. She is able to bring a distinct voice to each group of very distinct people that inhabit this area in a way that brings the people and the region alive.

    The plot of this novel, an alcoholic mother who lost her marriage, her child and her career and is slowly rebuilding her life could have become maudlin and melodramatic. But the author doesn't focus on the tragedies of Luna's life, she focuses on her rebuilding of her life and that makes a big difference.

    If I understand Ms. Samuel and all of her pseudonyms, this book is more of a romance than a women's fiction book, but I actually thought that the romance, while it does take up considerable space in the plot, isn't the main focus of the book. Emphasis is placed on all of her primary relationships, both the good ones and the bad ones, so we get to know Luna as a well rounded character, not just a woman falling in love. There is also considerable attention paid to the relationships of secondary characters in the book, some that Luna has no direct connection to. And yet, even if they are only on the periphery of Luna's life, they also help explain a part of her complex past.

    I found this book very compelling. I loved watching all of the characters, if not grow, at least gain in their understanding of themselves. I thought parts of it were terribly poignant and parts had universal applicability. It was essentially a novel of growth and acceptance. It had no highly dramatic climax. It seemed much more like the course of real life.

    Bernadette Dunne is one of my favorite narrators. She voices Samuel's characters beautifully.

    I highly recommend this book.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Dead Spots

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs)
    • By Melissa F. Olson
    • Narrated By Amy McFadden
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (475)
    Performance
    (432)
    Story
    (433)

    When LA’s vampires, witches, and werewolves make a mess, they call Scarlett Bernard to clean it up. Her ability as a null erases all magical traces from anything — or anyone — that comes within ten feet of her, and keeps humans in the dark about the city’s paranormal activity. One night when she’s called to a grisly crime scene, Scarlett is spied by the all-too-human LAPD cop Jesse Cruz, who strikes up a deal with her: he’ll keep quiet about the supernatural underworld if she helps him crack the case. She agrees, but the city’s chief vampire, Dash, starts to suspect Scarlett is behind the murders and will reveal all she knows of his shadowy empire. Now it’ll take more than Scarlett’s unique abilities to clear her name, keep the underworld underground, and track down the real killer.

    Aryn says: "It's different"
    "Unique Twist on an Overdone Genre"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am really tired of books where the entire plot is based upon the fact that the characters are vampires, werewolves and witches. If the book has an interesting premise, well developed characters, a plot that actually requires you to think or introduces you to new ideas and pulls you in emotionally either through humor, sympathy or in some other way AND some of the characters just happen to be vampires, werewolves or witches, then that is fine.

    I liked this book because while the plot focuses on the beings themselves, rather than on some larger worldly issue or event, the author introduces a new being that made this book different from the 900,000 other books covering the exact same plot. The main character is a Null, and when otherworldly characters are in her range, they loose all of their power and become human. I don't know if this plot device is enough to sustain multiple books, but it is enough to set at least this first book apart.

    One of the pluses of this new character is by her very nature, she is kind of a non-entity. Her importance isn't in what she does, it is in what she makes others "not" do. As a non-entity, then the author doesn't have to spend a lot of time developing Scarlett's character and personality. In fact most of this book seems to reenforce that she has very little character or personality beyond her ability to cancel others out just by her presence. She is certainly not emotionally connected to other characters.

    This was obviously an introduction to a series. When I read it, I realized that there were the beginnings of some interesting characters and some interesting story-lines waiting to be developed down the road. For the first book in a series, I think the author did a good job of piquing our interest to learn more. It remains to be seen if she can keep that interest as the series progresses.

    The narrator was OK. Occasionally slipping into the annoying category.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • When in Doubt, Add Butter

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Beth Harbison
    • Narrated By Orlagh Cassidy
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (136)
    Performance
    (122)
    Story
    (121)

    As far as Gemma is concerned, her days of dating are over. In fact, it’s her job to cater other peoples’ dates, and that’s just fine by her. At 37, she has her own business, working as a private chef, and her life feels full. She’s got six steady clients that keep her hands full. For Gemma, cooking is predictable. Recipes are certain. Use good ingredients, follow the directions, and you are assured success. Life, on the other hand, is full of variables. So when Gemma’s takes an unexpected turn on a road she always thought was straight and narrow, she must face her past.

    Erin DeAnjou says: "Predictable but Very Enjoyable"
    "Frustrating Read"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is my first Beth Harbison book. I am not sure I will try her other books. Ms. Harbison creates very interesting characters and the dialog is often witty and humorous. Several critical components necessary to a good book are there. But the interesting characters were unfortunately the secondary characters and they were not utilized fully. This was one of those books that when you finished it, you had no interest in learning what happened next to the main characters, but felt a mild curiosity about some of the secondary ones' futures.

    There were three critical flaws with the plot. First, the first half of the book meanders along with basically no plot. She introduces eccentric characters, has some funny dialog, but there is really no story there. Then once she gets to the main relationship of the book, she rushes through it so rapidly, it makes absolutely no sense. She spends so little time on the budding relationship between Gemma and Mac it is hard for the reader to accept that in the last 30 minutes of the audiobook they realize they are madly in love, willing to make major changes in their lives and he accepts what she has been hiding as if it is no big deal. They were virtual strangers. There was no relationship there one minute and the next, they were soul mates who lived happily ever after.

    The second flaw was that she did create sympathetic secondary characters and Gemma makes some pretty strong commitments to some of them. Commitments that she evidently abandons, based on the epilogue. That makes Gemma unsympathetic and dislike-able to me. Other characters you become interested in either just disappear or you get a rushed update on them in the epilogue that doesn't bring closure to the characters, and actually seem so out of character you wonder if she forgot what she had written about them previously.

    Finally, plots based on coincidences, poor timing, and a characters inability to clear things up when they first get the chance are almost always weak. This was no exception. It was so obvious who the mysterious Mac was it was hard to accept that Gemma really couldn't figure it out. This book would have been much more entertaining if the focus was on building the relationship between the two characters, not on the number of times they "almost" figured it out. It all seemed artificial and contrived.

    I finished this book with a sense that the author sat down to write a book that could be narrated in 7 hours and 55 minutes. Shed dilly dallied along with her characters until she looked at the clock, realized she had already written 7 hours and 25 minutes of content and spent the remaining 30 minutes developing and adding an actual plot, bringing it to a conclusion and writing an epilogue.

    I've read enough "Chick Lit" to know that they often spend more time on the main characters "inner thoughts" than an actual plot. That can work if the main character's "inner thoughts" are remotely interesting. In this book, they weren't.

    The narration was very good. If it had not been I would not have finished this book.





    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Last Chance Ranch

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Ruth Wind, Barbara Samuel
    • Narrated By Larry Oliver
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    Fans of Barbara Freethy and Susan Wiggs will devour this full length contemporary romantic tale of food and dogs, redemption and second chances by RITA award winner Barbara Samuel. As a romantic teen, Tanya Bishop married a passionate, intense man who ultimately ended up nearly killing her more than once. When she finally killed him to save herself and her son, Tonio, she was sent to prison, and her son went into the custory of her husband's cousin, Ramon Quezada, who runs a ranch for troubled boys.

    Lulu says: "Terrible Narration, Mediocre Book"
    "Terrible Narration, Mediocre Book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I will start by saying this is a Category Romance written by Barbara Samuel about 20 years ago, so the fact that is sounds terribly dated isn't surprising. When I read historical fiction I expect it to not include modern conveniences, but it is difficult for me to listen to something considered "contemporary" fiction that sounds like it might as well have been set 200 years ago.

    I have recently become a fan of Barbara Samuel/Barbara O'Neal's books, so thought I should at least try some of her early works when she wrote under the name Ruth Wind. And if I get past the "dated" issue and the obvious traditional format for books in this genre, the plot itself was fairly interesting.

    However, the narration was so poor I barely made it through the book. Mr. Oliver had a pleasant speaking voice and would probably be fine reading a book that didn't require he speak with any type of accent or dialect or include any children characters. But his "Spanish" accent was terrible and his kids' voices were worse. His female voice wasn't great, but probably no worse than most male narrators, and it didn't bother me as much.

    The problem went beyond that however. This book was edited terribly. There were at least 10 instances where words or phrases were repeated and you could tell that the editor had inserted the word or phrase without deleting the original.

    I am still a Barbara Samuel/Barbara O'Neal fan. And my expectations of her earlier work weren't all that high, so this disappointment won't put me off of her work. But I cannot recommend listening to this audiobook. If you insist on reading this author's early works, read the e-book or paperback instead.





    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Crazy Little Thing Called Love

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Molly Cannon
    • Narrated By Susan Bennett
    Overall
    (9)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (8)

    Etta Green kissed Everson, Texas, goodbye years ago. A big city chef, she intends to return only long enough to settle her beloved grandmother's estate and then hightail it back to Chicago. But Grammy Hazel had other plans. In her will, she left Etta part-ownership of a B&B that's about to go bankrupt before it even opens. And what's worse - Etta's partner is Donny Joe Ledbetter, a handsome devil with some serious bad-boy charm.

    Lulu says: "Disappointed"
    "Disappointed"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This was not a bad book. Parts of it were enjoyable. It just didn't last. The narration was very good. But I listened to this author's debut book Ain't Misbehavin and thought it was an incredibly well written, entertaining, unique book. The characters were all well developed and quite eccentric. While they were easily recognizable as a certain type of character - a proud, native Texan from a small town, they weren't stereotypical or a caricature of the species.

    I don't usually like books that focus on characters from a specific region or heritage. The author usually goes into overkill making the characters the epitome of the obnoxious Texan, or New Jerseyian or Italian, or whatever. That just makes the characters sound stupid and should be insulting to someone who comes from that region or shares that heritage. The author avoided this in Ain't Misbehavin. She doesn't in Crazy Little Thing Called Love.

    I felt the characters in this book were not nearly as well developed. And when their actions seemed unbelievable, they weren't just quirky - they really were unbelievable. And they were just too Texan, from good ole boy name of the hero to the fact that every other scene takes place in the same honky tonk. Even the narrator, who is a favorite of mine seemed to spread the Texas a little too thickly. I never understood why Donny Joe was a partner with Etta's grandmother in the B&B. And I certainly didn't understand why everyone seemed to think of Etta's sister's desertion of her only child as only irritating. It went beyond irritating. It not only made Etta's sister Belle a completely unlikeable character with no redeeming qualities, it made Etta less likeable. Her reaction to her sister's actions was so mild it made me think almost as poorly of Etta as it did Belle.

    Finally, this book lacked the humor and warmth of Ain't MIsbehavin. I didn't find the characters funny, engaging or particularly likeable. It is hard to like a book if you don't like the characters.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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