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L. A. Loman

Tony

St. Louis, MO | Member Since 2001

46
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 13 reviews
  • 17 ratings
  • 1283 titles in library
  • 56 purchased in 2014
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FOLLOWERS
4

  • Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Richard Rhodes
    • Narrated By Bernadette Dunne
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (68)
    Performance
    (60)
    Story
    (61)

    What do Hedy Lamarr, avant-garde composer George Antheil, and your cell phone have in common? The answer is spread-spectrum radio: a revolutionary inven­tion based on the rapid switching of communications sig­nals among a spread of different frequencies. Without this technology, we would not have the digital comforts that we take for granted today. Only a writer of Richard Rhodes’s caliber could do justice to this remarkable story. Unhappily married to a Nazi arms dealer, Lamarr fled to America at the start of World War II; she brought with her not only her theatrical talent....

    Darryl says: "fascinating short bio"
    "Engaging history"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Practically everything in this book was a revelation to me. Rhode's presentation of Hedy's life and personality was wonderful. The book is about equally a biography of Hedy and George Antheil. Learned later about the recent revival of his music which is very interesting. Bernadette's reading is also very good.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Fifty Degrees Below: Science in the Capital, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (20 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Kim Stanley Robinson
    • Narrated By Peter Ganim, Kim Stanley Robinson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (55)
    Performance
    (25)
    Story
    (25)

    Best-selling, award-winning, author Kim Stanley Robinson continues his groundbreaking trilogy of eco-thrillers - and propels us deeper into the awesome whirlwind of climatic change. Set in our nation's capital, here is a chillingly realistic tale of people caught in the collision of science, technology, and the consequences of global warming - which could trigger another phenomenon: abrupt climate change, resulting in temperatures. BONUS AUDIO: Includes an exclusive introduction by author Kim Stanley Robinson.

    Grant says: "Avoid this narrator!"
    "Domestic comedy, serious underlying climate theme"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you listen to Fifty Degrees Below again? Why?

    Yes, in a year or two because I enjoyed so many of the scenes. Robinson's affection for his fictitious characters is contagious. And so much of the book rings true, at least in my experience with children, scientists and academics.


    Which character – as performed by Peter Ganim and Kim Stanley Robinson – was your favorite?

    Liked several but would have to say Charlie.


    Any additional comments?

    Several have commented on the reader Ganim. He narrates very deliberately and I know this irritates some people who want the narration to be very dramatic. I just focused on the content rather than the slow reading style. I think he did a great job on the dialogue, though, using different voices, inflections and accents. As to the underlying theme of the book, Robinson is able to insert important little treatises on climate change and on the role of scientists in society without coming across as pedantic. I liked that.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Joseph E. Stiglitz
    • Narrated By Paul Boehmer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (434)
    Performance
    (365)
    Story
    (367)

    The top 1 percent of Americans control 40 percent of the nation's wealth. And, as Joseph E. Stiglitz explains, while those at the top enjoy the best health care, education, and benefits of wealth, they fail to realize that "their fate is bound up with how the other 99 percent live." Stiglitz draws on his deep understanding of economics to show that growing inequality is not inevitable. He examines our current state, then teases out its implications for democracy, for monetary and budgetary policy, and for globalization. He closes with a plan for a more just and prosperous future.

    Grant says: "Dense, but important."
    "Convincing arguments"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you consider the audio edition of The Price of Inequality to be better than the print version?

    I think it is easier to listen but the print or Kindle (which I have) version helps with tables, charts, and statistics provided in the text. In order to recall it later I find that it helps to read as well as hear that type of material. Also, the book contained detailed footnotes and references. By having the print version, I was able to look up reference materials and read it myself.


    What did you like best about this story?

    This is nonfiction but there is nonetheless a story line tracing the development of inequality over the 20th Century. The most important message is that inequality hurts everyone including those at the top and that a certain amount of income and wealth leveling is good for everyone.


    0 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Winner Take All: China's Race for Resources and What It Means for the World

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Dambisa Moyo
    • Narrated By Ken Perlstein
    Overall
    (21)
    Performance
    (20)
    Story
    (20)

    Winner Take All is about the commodity dynamics that the world will face over the next several decades. In particular, it is about the implications of China’s rush for resources across all regions of the world. The scale of China’s resource campaign for hard commodities (metals and minerals) and soft commodities (timber and food) is among the largest in history.

    Barton Berg says: "Reader is Terrible"
    "Great book, poor reader"
    Overall
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    Story
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    I agree with most of the other reviewers that Ken was not the best choice for narrator. He seems to read words rather than sentences, and often emphasizes the wrong words. In some cases I had to restate the sentences in my head before they made sense. Pronunciation is generally good but he sometimes skips articles, like "a" and "the" when he comes to a word that is going to be difficult. This distracts from an otherwise excellent book. Nonetheless, I think it was well worth my time in spite of the reader. I was gratified to discover that the book is about much more than China. Moyo sets each resource in its international context before telling us how China is reacting. The book evidently has many charts and graphs and it would have been nice to have those available while I listened, andI think I am going to buy the print version so that I can go back and look at the graphics. I will put it next to Gilding's, The Great Disruption, another book worth listening to.


    Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Ken Perlstein?

    The great Grover Gardner would have been better.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Revelations: Visions, Prophecy, and Politics in the Book of Revelation

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Elaine Pagels
    • Narrated By Lorna Raver
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (224)
    Performance
    (182)
    Story
    (181)

    Elaine Pagels explores the surprising history of the most controversial book of the Bible. In the waning days of the Roman Empire, militant Jews in Jerusalem had waged anall-out war against Rome’s occupation of Judea, and their defeat resulted in the desecration of the Great Temple in Jerusalem. In the aftermath of that war, John of Patmos, a Jewish prophet and follower of Jesus, wrote the Book of Revelation, prophesying God’s judgment on the pagan empire that devastated and dominated his people.

    Diane says: "Revealing "Revelations""
    "Historical view of Revelations"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    In this book, Pagels puts Revelations in its historical context and shows how it lies in the tradition of Jewish prophetic/apocalyptic literature and how it may be related to gnostic-Christian literature. She described, correctly in my opinion, how it was really a rather close thing that the book came to be included in the New Testament--still being debated in the 3rd and 4th centuries, as the canon was solidified. Pagel's book is required reading for anyone who thinks the New Testament and particularly the book of Revelations was simply dropped out of the sky by God one day. She devotes a good deal of space in the book to Athanasius, the bishop of Alexandria. Was he a saint, a villain, or both? Fascinating account--how he co-opted the monasteries, how his Life of Anthony, the book that so influenced later Christians, is likely rather pure fiction to promote Church control of monasteries. Athanasius was responsible for suppressing gnostic writings (and, of course, Arius) and may have been the ultimate cause of the gnostic books being hidden at Nag Hammadi. Since this was the time of Emperor Constantine, Athanasius had to reinterpret the beast in Revelations to refer to Christian heretics rather than its rather obvious original 1st century reference to the Roman Empire. This is but one example, as she points out, of the continuing reinterpretation of the symbolism in this book over subsequent centuries to explain present calamities or to predict future ones. Lots more to the book than I can cover here. I thoroughly enjoyed the it. I also liked the reader--strong female voice for a strong writer.

    8 of 10 people found this review helpful
  • Peak Everything: Waking Up to the Century of Declines

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Richard Heinberg
    • Narrated By Edward Dalmas
    Overall
    (29)
    Performance
    (19)
    Story
    (18)

    Peak Everything addresses many of the cultural, psychological and practical changes we will have to make as nature rapidly dictates our new limits. This latest book from Richard Heinberg, author of three of the most important books on Peak Oil, touches on the most important aspects of the human condition at this unique moment in time.

    A combination of wry commentary and sober forecasting on subjects as diverse as farming and industrial design, this book tells how we might make the transition from The Age of Excess to the Era of Modesty with grace and satisfaction....

    L. A. Loman says: "Okay for those new to peak resources"
    "Okay for those new to peak resources"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I found myself skipping over chapters in this book. Its not that I think that Heinberg is completely wrong but that many of the topics of the essays that make up the chapters are rehashes of ideas that Heinberg himself and others have written about while other chapters seem to be tangential to the theme of the book's title. If you are new to the idea of peak oil or more generally the depletion of environmental capital then this might be a good book for you, but I suggest two others below that are better to start. Be warned that some of the essays, such as Chapter 10's A Letter from the Future, suggest a completely collapsed future world, a la Kunstler's The Long Emergency. If you agree with such simplistic thinking you will like that Chapter, but you may find yourself asking whether running out of resources might lead to more complex outcomes. In this context, I want to plug a much better read, the Great Disruption by Paul Gilding, also available from Audible. If you want to be educated about depletion, that is the book to read, with its references to studies (such as those of the Global Footprint Network and the follow-up analyses of Limits to Growth). Gilding is able to be optimistic and to end the book with suggestions for what we can do now. If you want to read Heinberg, I suggest his The End of Growth, also available from Audible. A focused book rather than rambling essays.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Earthbound

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By Joe Haldeman
    • Narrated By Annie Henk
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (20)
    Performance
    (19)
    Story
    (19)

    Hugo and Nebula Award winner Joe Haldeman ranks among the greatest science fiction authors to ever live. This thrilling entry from his Marsbound saga finds the mysterious alien Others prohibiting humans from space travel by destroying Earth’s fleet of starships in a display of unimaginable power. But Carmen Dula, the first human to encounter the Others, is determined to find a way to reclaim the future that has been stolen from humankind.

    Eric says: "Do yourself a favor and skip this conclusion"
    "An interlude before the final book?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a followup to Haldeman's earlier books: Marsbound and Starbound. However, there is no resolution to the dilemma set up in the earlier books. The description of the book here at Audible hinted that there would be a solution but we are left hanging. Carmen does not "find a way to reclaim the future that has been stolen from humankind." Perhaps Haldeman is writing a fourth book. Hope so. His writing and ideas are superior as always. Good reader also.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress - and a Plan to Stop It

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By Lawrence Lessig
    • Narrated By Lawrence Lessig
    Overall
    (276)
    Performance
    (245)
    Story
    (234)

    In an era of ballooning corporate campaign expenditures, unleashed by the Supreme Court in Citizens United, trust in our government is at an all time low. More than ever before, Americans believe that money buys results in Congress - and that our Republic has been lost.Using examples that resonate as powerfully on the Right as on the Left, Republic, Lost not only makes clear how the economy of influence defeats the will of the people, but offers cogent strategies to correct our course....

    kevmoo says: "A profoundly important book. A must read."
    "Required Listening"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book should be required reading (listening) for all Americans of all political persuasions. It is at the top of my list of nonfiction books read or listened to in 2011. Lessig's reading is passionate. His arguments and examples are convincing. You do not have to agree with every argument to be convinced of the basic conclusion of the book--that our government has been corrupted and stolen from the people by large corporate financial interests. Listen to the book and then join and become active in Rootstrikers or one of the several other organizations he lists.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Minority Report and Other Stories (Unabridged Stories)

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Philip K. Dick
    • Narrated By Keir Dullea
    Overall
    (651)
    Performance
    (253)
    Story
    (259)

    Viewed by many as the greatest science fiction writer on any planet, Philip K. Dick has written some of the most intriguing, original, and thought-provoking fiction of our time. This collection includes "The Minority Report," "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale," "Paycheck," "Second Variety," and "The Eyes Have It."

    Travis says: "Nice Collection of Four P.D.K. Short Stories"
    "Minority Report"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I had read some of these many years ago. I never really liked the way the Dick developed his characters but his ideas--his IDEAS--were and are amazing. That is why so many movies have been made of these stories, sometimes changing the story lines significantly (as in Minority Report) but retaining the central ideas. So, I think the book is a good listen for that reason, plus Dullea does a good job.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The God Engines

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By John Scalzi
    • Narrated By Christopher Lane
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (179)
    Performance
    (140)
    Story
    (140)

    Captain Ean Tephe is a man of faith, whose allegiance to his lord and to his ship is uncontested. The Bishopry Militant knows this — and so, when it needs a ship and crew to undertake a secret, sacred mission to a hidden land, Tephe is the captain to whom the task is given....

    L. A. Loman says: "I love Scalzi's writing but not this book"
    "I love Scalzi's writing but not this book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The reader is good but the book has a depressing and cynical ending. I have read most of Scalzi's other works and several have been excellent--wonderful characters, funny and sometime hilarious dialog, good story development and good endings for those of us that like morality tales. Not so this book. Some good ideas but a disappointing story. However, I realize that some readers/listeners might like the book. Just be prepared for a black black conclusion.

    10 of 11 people found this review helpful

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