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Keith

Brooklyn, NY, United States

7
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 1 reviews
  • 16 ratings
  • 67 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
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  • The Question of God: C. S. Lewis and Sigmund Freud Debate God, Love, Sex, and the Meaning of Life

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Armand M. Nicholi
    • Narrated By Robert Whitfield
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (48)
    Performance
    (26)
    Story
    (25)

    Renowned psychiatrist and educator Armand Nicholi here presents a fascinating comparison of the beliefs of Sigmund Freud and C. S. Lewis. In the 20th century, no spokesman was more prominent for nonbelief than Sigmund Freud, and no one argued for belief more successfully than C. S. Lewis. From pain and suffering to love and sex, from God to morality, Lewis and Freud carefully argued opposing positions and even considered the chief objections to their positions.

    Glenda says: "Excellent rivals!"
    "A Question of "Who is More Likable?""
    Overall

    Maybe the title is somewhat misleading as I think it set my expectations for something slightly different. The subtitle is more accurate.
    Much of the book was a just a comparison of the way they lived their lives: which had very little to do with whether god exists or not. Lewis, was a more likable guy.... so? He believed in a god, a plan, eternal life.... it made him happy to do so: it eased his anxieties, made him feel like he had a purpose.
    The effect is profound, but it has nothing to do with the existence of any gods.

    Still, it was an interesting comparison of the two. Very slanted towards portraying Lewis in a positive light after his conversion. Nicholi continually analyzed Freud's rationale - but never Lewis. This was frustrating in contrast to the critique of Freud, because there are many instances where Lewis' actions should be critiqued and underlying motives dissected. Lewis was also severel depressed (more than Freud?), before his conversion..did god magically alter his brain chemistry? The depression just disappeared.... What were his sub-conscious motives for converting? The author never discussed though seemingly apparent.
    I enjoyed it, but I wished it went one level deeper with its analysis of actions and motives and wasnt so pro-Lewis.

    7 of 16 people found this review helpful

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