Call anytime(888) 283-5051
 

You no longer follow Karen

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Karen

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Karen

Portland, OR, United States

ratings
60
REVIEWS
30
FOLLOWING
4
FOLLOWERS
5
HELPFUL VOTES
50

  • Red Mist

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Patricia Cornwell
    • Narrated By Kate Burton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1118)
    Performance
    (889)
    Story
    (899)

    Determined to find out what happened to her former deputy chief, Jack Fielding, murdered six months earlier, Kay Scarpetta travels to the Georgia Prison for Women, where an inmate has information not only on Fielding, but also on a string of grisly killings. The murder of an Atlanta family years ago, a young woman on death row, and the inexplicable deaths of homeless people as far away as California seem unrelated. But Scarpetta discovers connections that compel her to conclude that what she thought ended with Fielding's death and an attempt on her own life is only the beginning....

    Rene says: "Too much dialog, too little story"
    "Better than average Scarpetta, abysmal narration"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Unlike some of the other reviewers, I found the plot and characterization acceptable, but not outstanding. After reading all of the other Scarpetta novels (but having never listened to one), I can say that there are some redeeming qualities to some of the characters, and the plot was intriguing, although sometimes confusing, as she is concerned with three different cases that span more than a decade.

    The narration, however, is one of the worst I've encountered in any of the dozens, if not hundreds, of audiobooks I've enjoyed. The woman's voice is a monotone, and as another reviewer pointed out, makes Scarpetta sound depressed and cynical, with none of the bright features of her personality. She consistently mispronounces words, suggesting that she is simply reading the text "cold" and has not studied it at all. Barely worth a credit. I'll certainly not buy any more books by this narrator.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • The Silkworm

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Robert Galbraith
    • Narrated By Robert Glenister
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2290)
    Performance
    (2129)
    Story
    (2125)

    When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, Mrs. Quine just thinks her husband has gone off by himself for a few days - as he has done before - and she wants Strike to find him and bring him home. But as Strike investigates, it becomes clear that there is more to Quine's disappearance than his wife realizes. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows.

    H James Lucas says: "A well-worn genre enlivened with fresh characters"
    "Even better than the first installment"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I truly hope that Galbraith/Rowling has outlined several books in advance, the way that Harry Potter was written, so that the wait between books can be shorter. I have become very fond of Cormoran Strike, and Robert Glenister does a keen and clever job of bringing him to life with a unique voice and manner.

    On the heels of his success detailed in The Cuckoo's Calling, Cormoran is slightly more flush than he was in the first book. Without a clear idea of how he will get paid, he sets out to solve the murder of a controversial writer whose wife has been (unjustly, in Cormoran's view) blamed for his grisly murder. Some may object to the graphic details of this crime, and the audible format makes it awkward to skim ahead. These details are central to solving the murder, so grit your teeth and pay attention if you can.

    I enjoyed getting additional information about Cormoran's background and we meet some new and engaging characters, as well. I seldom believe that a book deserves five stars, but this book fully engaged me and I enjoyed every minute. Thanks, JK/Robert!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Little Friend

    • UNABRIDGED (25 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Donna Tartt
    • Narrated By Karen White
    Overall
    (289)
    Performance
    (204)
    Story
    (203)

    From the author of The Secret History comes a dark, suspenseful novel of lost childhood. Harriet Dusfresnes is a child in Mississippi, haunted by the murder of her brother when she was just a baby. He was found hanging from a tree in their backyard; his killer was never identified, nor did the family ever recover. Only Harriet's teenage sister might have seen what happened that day, and she has blocked it out from her memory.

    Sam says: "Couldn't put it down"
    "Just could not listen"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I found this narrator so difficult to listen to; I gave up on this book after about an hour, and cannot give it an honest appraisal. Her dialect/accent seems disingenuous and she often ends her sentences on an interrogatory upwards note, which is usually indicative of someone lacking confidence. I also found her frequent, audible deep breaths to be so distracting that I just couldn't continue. The book sounds worth reading, and I adored Ms. Tartt's The Goldfinch, so I will read the book in print as an alternative.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Joyland

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 33 mins)
    • By Stephen King
    • Narrated By Michael Kelly
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3027)
    Performance
    (2799)
    Story
    (2801)

    Set in a small-town North Carolina amusement park in 1973, Joyland tells the story of the summer in which college student Devin Jones comes to work as a carny and confronts the legacy of a vicious murder, the fate of a dying child, and the ways both will change his life forever. Joyland is a brand-new novel and has never previously been published.

    Cozy Reader says: "The sweest and creepiest coming of age story!"
    "Don't Judge a Book by its Cover"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I bought this book months ago and procrastinated listening to it, primarily because it was billed as a "mystery" and the "cover" seemed to portray a crime noir type novel, and I wasn't sure that was what I was looking for. I was so wrong.

    This is an honest and heartfelt coming of age story, with a mystery as a story device to move things along. I heartily concur with other reviewers who insist that Stephen King has gotten an unfair reputation - usually by people who have never read one of his books.

    I love Stephen King. I love the way he puts so much of himself so generously in each book that he writes. I love the way he writes dialogue and never assumes an omniscient point of view over all characters - the sign of a lazy writer. Writing in the first person is the most challenging task a writer can take on, and he does it to perfection. We learn about the other characters through the eyes of the narrator, not through broad statements like "she was scared," or "he was disappointed." Instead, we learn about his characters through their actions and their dialogue, just like in real life. Tricky business for a writer, and he does it so skillfully that we don't even realize he is doing it.

    Books seldom bring me to tears. This one did. Just listen to it. You'll be so glad you did.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Silent Mercy

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Linda Fairstein
    • Narrated By Barbara Rosenblat
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (235)
    Performance
    (154)
    Story
    (152)

    It's the middle of the night. Prosecutor Alexandra Cooper is called to Harlem's Mount Neboh Baptist Church, a beautiful house of worship originally built as a synagogue. But the crowd gathered there isn't interested in architecture, or even prayer. They've come for the same reason Alex has: to find out why the body of a young woman has been decapitated, set on fire, and left burning on the church steps.

    Beverly says: "Not up to Fairstein's Usual Flair"
    "Good story, but could not handle the narrator..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I realize that Barbara Rosenblat is an esteemed narrator, but this is the second book I have listened to that I did not enjoy, because of her narration. This book is not great literature, and I'm sure it was never intended as such. That said, it IS a good story, with interesting characters. A narrator can surely influence the listener's perception of the characters, and her interpretation led me to see some of the female characters as hysterical whiners, when I am sure that is not how the author meant for them to be portrayed. Granted, there are a number of strong female characters, but it is almost impossible to tell them apart by the narration. This is the first Alexandra Cooper book I have read. I liked the book and will read others in the series, but I will read them in print, not as audio books.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Goldfinch

    • UNABRIDGED (32 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Donna Tartt
    • Narrated By David Pittu
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (8312)
    Performance
    (7620)
    Story
    (7627)

    The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present-day America and a drama of enthralling force and acuity. It begins with a boy. Theo Decker, a 13-year-old New Yorker, miraculously survives an accident that kills his mother. Abandoned by his father, Theo is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. Bewildered by his strange new home on Park Avenue, disturbed by schoolmates who don't know how to talk to him, and tormented above all by his unbearable longing for his mother, he clings to one thing that reminds him of her: a small, mysteriously captivating painting that ultimately draws Theo into the underworld of art.

    B.J. says: "A stunning achievement - for author and narrator"
    "A failure of technique"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I do respect the fact that it took Donna Tartt more than a decade to write this book. It is L-O-N-G, which is not, for me, a deterrent to enjoyment. In fact, I grew so used to the steady rhythm of this book that I was taken aback when the rhythm changed toward the end. I understand that the author felt the need to pontificate a bit, and I may be all alone when I object to this slightly. When Theo expresses his philosophies at the end, this seems (to me) almost a failure of authorship. Generally speaking, an author chooses a character or characters to pronounce the theme(s) of the book, and Boris does quite a good job at this, and so does Hobie. I realize that Theo has something else, something additional, to say, but the clever use of a literary device might make it more palatable than just smacking us over the head with it at the end, thereby compromising the warp and weave of the book's fabric. Maybe she tried doing it a different way, and Theo just had SO MUCH to say that it didn't work through dialogue. Then, I would argue that it is TOO much. It's like a Steven Spielberg movie, when he is so insecure sometimes about the theme that he takes us by the hand and leads us to it, and then yells, "SEE!" He does this, especially, in Empire of the Sun, which I loved. But I felt insulted that he had such little respect for the viewers' intelligence. I feel the same about Donna Tartt. I want to holler, "I get it, I get it, already!"

    Having said all that, I did love the book. I loved what it had to say, and (mostly) I loved how it said it. I think, like all things, what we take away from a book is up to the reader. I refuse to sink into nihilism with Theo, although he does expound at great length about the middle ground where beauty and love exist. I think he has not much partaken of those things, but perhaps he will. Who knows?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Crocodile on the Sandbank: The Amelia Peabody Series, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Elizabeth Peters
    • Narrated By Barbara Rosenblat
    Overall
    (2719)
    Performance
    (1508)
    Story
    (1503)

    Amelia Peabody inherited two things from her father: a considerable fortune and an unbendable will. The first allowed her to indulge in her life's passion. Without the second, the mummy's curse would have made corpses of them all.

    Carrie says: "Nice break from the usual-"
    "I am obviously part of a minority..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    ...in that I did not care for this book. I would not be finishing it if it were not required reading for my book club. I started out with the book as an ebook, realized I would never be able to finish it, and opted for an audible version. I have never been so irritated by a narrator. Why does Barbara Rosenblat take these great gulps of air every few sentences? I never hear other narrators do this. Perhaps she has asthma? Is a heavy smoker? In any event, I find it very unprofessional and highly distracting. And I realize that my ill humor makes me sound like Amelia Peabody herself, who is, in my opinion, unnecessarily arrogant and full of herself. Sorry - I'll content myself being a member of a minority, and pass on the rest of this series, plus any book narrated by Barbara Rosenblat.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Good Omens

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett
    • Narrated By Martin Jarvis
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4161)
    Performance
    (2632)
    Story
    (2664)

    The world will end on Saturday. Next Saturday. Just before dinner, according to The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch, the world's only completely accurate book of prophecies, written in 1655. The armies of Good and Evil are amassing and everything appears to be going according to Divine Plan. Except that a somewhat fussy angel and a fast-living demon are not actually looking forward to the coming Rapture. And someone seems to have misplaced the Antichrist.

    Lauren says: "Great voice adds to already amazing story"
    "I don't have much to add..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    ...to previous reviews. I think it has all been said. Except that, I just do want to put in another word for Martin Jarvis, whose narration of this book is simply brilliant. A few reviewers have mentioned his failure to pause at breaks in the story. I actually did not notice that, but I suppose it could be irritating if one does notice it. There are so many recurring and steady characters; I found it amazing that he was able to find a distinct voice for each one.

    I enjoyed this book immensely. It is a memorable read/listen and I'm sure I will listen to it again and again.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Light of the World: A Dave Robicheaux Novel, Book 20

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By James Lee Burke
    • Narrated By Will Patton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1075)
    Performance
    (954)
    Story
    (944)

    In Light of the World, sadist and serial killer Asa Surrette narrowly escaped the death penalty for the string of heinous murders. But following a series of damning articles written by Dave Robicheaux’s daughter Alafair about possible other crimes committed by Surette, the killer escapes from a prison transport van and heads to Montana - where an unsuspecting Dave happens to have gone to take in the sweet summer air, accompanied by Alafair, his wife Molly, faithful partner Clete, and Clete’s newfound daughter, Gretchen Horowitz.

    Dave says: "Burke is still the best"
    "Sorry, JLB, not my favorite Robicheaux"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I agree that JLB is probably the best American fiction writer alive today. And after I read Creole Belle, the book that preceded this one, I did not think that the series could get any better. Unfortunately, for me, it didn't.

    While listening to an audio book, I find it difficult to separate the writing from the narrator. Will Patton is one of my favorite narrators, and I just finished his masterful performance of Alas, Babylon. So I was surprised to find (as other reviewers have mentioned) that his performance in this book is somewhat lackluster. I agree that his rendering of Gretchen is so poor as to be distracting. And he seems to lose his place from time to time, carrying over in one character's voice into another's, or the narration. I was tempted to simply give up and purchase the print version, and I probably eventually will.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Lacuna

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 18 mins)
    • By Barbara Kingsolver
    • Narrated By Barbara Kingsolver
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (801)
    Performance
    (295)
    Story
    (290)

    Born in the United States, but reared in Mexico, Harrison Shepherd finds precarious shelter but no sense of home on his thrilling odyssey. Life is whatever he learns from housekeepers and, one fateful day, by mixing plaster for famed muralist Diego Rivera. When he goes to work for Rivera, his wife, exotic artist Kahlo, and exiled leader Lev Trotsky, Shepherd inadvertently casts his lot with art and revolution.

    Tricia Stevens says: "Great story!"
    "Give this book a try, despite the narrator"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was also deeply disappointed when I began listening to this book, and still believe that a good listen could become a truly memorable listen if a professional narrator were employed. Nevertheless, this is a remarkable book, and the author's gentle and somewhat tentative voice is especially well-suited to the latter part of the book, which is told by Violet Green.

    As an American expat who has lived almost a decade in Mexico, and who remembers the HUAC hearings when I was a small child, this book was a perfect match for me. I delighted in Harrison's descriptions of Mexico, sharing his love for this country for the same reasons; he expressed it much more articulately than I can. And I remember the fear and consternation on my parents' faces when they were asked, as teachers, to sign loyalty oaths.

    This is a book about two very different cultures, and an extraordinary man who sought comfort in each, but never quite found it. That is a gross oversimplification, because the true wonder of this book lies in the manner in which the author chose to tell it. She never resorts to the "third person omniscient" point of view, but instead lets the readers draw their own conclusions about the characters by observing their behavior and listening to their own voices. Only a very skilled writer is able to do this, and I am grateful to Ms. Kingsolver for having faith in the intelligence and perception of her readers.

    I am a compulsive and eclectic reader, and many of the books I read are for entertainment only. This book is truly an exception. It enriched my spirit and I hope it does the same for yours.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Defending Jacob: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By William Landay
    • Narrated By Grover Gardner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4010)
    Performance
    (3423)
    Story
    (3418)

    Andy Barber has been an assistant district attorney in his suburban Massachusetts county for more than 20 years. He is respected in his community, tenacious in the courtroom, and happy at home with his wife, Laurie, and son, Jacob. But when a shocking crime shatters their New England town, Andy is blindsided by what happens next: his 14-year-old son is charged with the murder of a fellow student.

    Shauna says: "Defending Jacob"
    "Disturbing and compelling"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a plot that could obviously come straight from the newspaper headlines. A teenaged boy is accused of murdering one of his classmates. However, this book is not so much plot-driven as character-driven. When I was about halfway through listening, I remarked to my husband that the book is so disturbing and depressing I was tempted not to finish. But I had to finish, "just in order to find out what happens."

    "What happens" is not what I expected. And the author gets us there in a cunningly skillful manner, alternating between a straight chronology of events and excerpts of grand jury testimony which obviously comes further down the road. It is not until near the end that we learn the identity of the defendant before this grand jury.

    The narrator is similarly skilled, and I am so very pleased that I chose to listen to this book, rather than read it in print. I'm sure I would have enjoyed it, but listening to a book often makes the listener more aware of the writing quality.

    I would definitely recommend the book, despite its dark subject matter.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.