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Joshua

Spring Mills, PA, United States | Member Since 2010

14
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 16 reviews
  • 57 ratings
  • 255 titles in library
  • 59 purchased in 2014
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  • Masaryk Station: A John Russell Thriller, Book 6

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By David Downing
    • Narrated By Michael Healy
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (23)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (20)

    Berlin, early 1948: The city, still occupied by the four Allied powers, still largely in ruins, has become the cockpit of a new Cold War, and as spring unfolds its German inhabitants live in fear of the Soviets enforcing a Western withdrawal. Here, as elsewhere in Europe, the legacies of the War have become entangled in the new Soviet-American conflict, creating a world of bizarre and fleeting loyalties, a paradise for spies. John Russell works for both Stalin’s NKVD and the newly-created CIA. He does as little for either as he can safely get away with.

    joyce says: "What a disappointment...and it's all the narrator"
    "A nice completion to a good series, nearly ruined."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I've worked my way through the John Russel series, by David Downing, and enjoyed all of them. I don't understand why the whole series isn't available. I bought the paperback of the missing book so I could maintain the story line. I suppose the series can be read out of order, but it is really more of a single long novel and more enjoyable to read in order. This book did a nice job of summing up and closing the series. If you've enjoyed the story and characters in these somewhat slow paced, but well written books, I think you could enjoy this one.

    But,,,,(and it's a significant but), the reader is nearly awful. The book is full of mispronunciations. I can ignore a lot of that, but the reader sometimes pronounces the proper name "Thomas" in the ordinary way, (tomas), but then, inexplicably will pronounce the Th, (thomas, as in Thermos), Again and again. It's really annoying.

    So, if you can find this book performed by another reader, buy that version. If you can't, well, the story is a good solid David Downing story and important for closure to those of us who follow a series, so you'll just have to try to turn a deaf ear to the narrator, and do your best to enjoy the writing.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Keeper of Lost Causes: Department Q, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Jussi Adler-Olsen
    • Narrated By Erik Davies
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1694)
    Performance
    (1471)
    Story
    (1470)

    Jussi Adler-Olsen is Denmark's premier crime writer. His books routinely top the bestseller lists in northern Europe, and he's won just about every Nordic crime-writing award, including the prestigious Glass Key Award-also won by Henning Mankell, Stieg Larsson, and Jo Nesbo. Now, Dutton is thrilled to introduce him to America.

    Ted says: "Dark, Cold, and Danish"
    "What a terrible idea."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This was an uninspired book, listenable, but not very gripping. Well, actually, it really was only just barely listenable. I don't know who directed the audio, but having all the dialog read with a Danish accent was almost, very nearly, just about insufferable. I knew the book was Scandinavian since I couldn't pronounce the author's first name and Adler-Olsen doesn't sound like anything else but, and I read the blurb, so I didn't need to be reminded by the reader's (perhaps) pretty good version of a Danish accent all the way through! Except that all of the characters internal dialogues were in perfect, unaccented English. Huh?? It made a weak story very tiresome, but luckily for this book, I was listening while doing some work that required enough concentration that I wasn't totally focused on the book. I'd have never made it through if I hadn't had something else to occupy my mind.

    As far as the story goes, it was pretty mediocre. I want a hero who has some quality I like. "Corl", (as pronounced by the performer), is a sexist, racist misanthrope. That can be OK, as long as he's an interesting sexist, racist, misanthrope, who maybe expresses a streak of dark humor, or unintentional selflessness, or has some redeeming quality, but "Corl" doesn't. The major plot device is impractical and unbelievable, and if you're write a story where a major plot point involves someone being held in total isolation for many years, perhaps a little research about the effect of solitary confinement on an individual is in order.

    I can't recommend this one. I reserve one star for books I can't finish, but if a fraction of a star could be assigned this book wouldn't get two.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Snowman

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Jo Nesbø
    • Narrated By Robin Sachs
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2127)
    Performance
    (1453)
    Story
    (1455)

    Oslo in November. The first snow of the season has fallen. A boy named Jonas wakes in the night to find his mother gone. Out his window, in the cold moonlight, he sees the snowman that inexplicably appeared in the yard earlier in the day. Around its neck is his mother’s pink scarf. Hole suspects a link between a menacing letter he’s received and the disappearance of Jonas’s mother - and of perhaps a dozen other women, all of whom went missing on the day of a first snowfall. As his investigation deepens, something else emerges: he is becoming a pawn....

    Anita says: "many layered thriller"
    "I have one question"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Ok, I really like this series and this author. Great writing, fun, suspenseful plot, really engaging character development.

    But, I have one question, and I'd almost downrate the story another star because of this, it seems such a blatant error in such a well crafted story. In what is the penultimate scene, when the villain has set his diabolical trap, how does he get out of the room?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Woodcutter

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Reginald Hill
    • Narrated By Jonathan Keeble
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1207)
    Performance
    (900)
    Story
    (896)

    Wolf Hadda's life was a fairytale - successful businessman and adored husband. But a knock on the door one morning ends it all. Universally reviled, thrown into prison, Wolf retreats into silence. Seven years later Wolf begins to talk to the prison psychiatrist and receives parole to return home. But there's a mysterious period in Wolf's past when he was known as the Woodcutter. Now the Woodcutter is back, looking for truth and revenge...

    Diana says: "One of my favorite Reginald Hill books!"
    "A nice surprise"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I really enjoyed this book and give a it solid four star rating. I hadn't listened to any of Hill's work and between the sample and the publisher's blurb expected less from this.

    Hill has an engaging style, sometimes writing quite brilliantly. He delivers a real gem in his portrayal of the supporting character, "Johnathan Nutbrown", creating a genuinely amusing man, perhaps a gentle savant, who sees the world with a morality free psyche. A wonderful detail. His other characters are well drawn and nicely likable, or hateful, with plenty of emotional and physical depth for this sort of genre.

    I give a solid four stars to the story and no more, because I found the whole ax thing a little difficult to swallow. I'm older than the hero, and have spent a fair amount of time in the woods, and it's really unusual to find anyone using an ax in a traditional way. The idea that the lead character was brought up a master axman needed to be fleshed out in some way to explain this, because without that, it seems a little contrived.

    In addition the denouement seemed weak and a little hurried, not as craftfully sculpted as much of the rest the story. Some elements of the scene didn't have much to do with the rest of the story and some of it seemed, well, awkward. It wasn't bad, but, judging from the quality of other sections of the book, it could have been better. That scene is the culmination of the story; for a five star rating it must be exceptional. And, I'm not sure that the opening scene was particularly pertinent, or very necessary.

    Five full stars to Johnathan Keeble. He does a beautiful job, one of the rare male readers who, when voicing women, doesn't create a world full of six foot tall transvestites sporting 5 o'clock shadow. A rare talent. His other voices are very good. They must still teach elocution somewhere in the British Isles.

    This is a good one.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Floor of Heaven: A True Tale of the Last Frontier and the Yukon Gold Rush

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Howard Blum
    • Narrated By John H. Mayer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (65)
    Performance
    (44)
    Story
    (45)

    It is the last decade of the 19th century. The Wild West has been tamed and its fierce, independent and often violent larger-than-life figures – gun-toting wanderers, trappers, prospectors, Indian fighters, cowboys, and lawmen –are now victims of their own success. They are heroes who’ve outlived their usefulness.

    Lynn says: "An Entertaining History"
    "A major disappointment"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was really excited about buying this title. Charles Siringo is a fascinating character, and because all my knowledge of the Yukon gold rush comes from Jack London, I was eagerly looking forward to learning about the actual history and people involved. I bought the book without listening to the sample, a mistake I won't make again.

    I will admit I couldn't finish this book, made it through 3/4s of it and gave up. I found Blum's style excruciating. I can only say that he nearly rivals Franklin W. Dixon's powers of description and character development, but not quite. In fact, my history teacher wife overheard some of the book and thought I was listening to a badly written young adult thriller. It's that bad. I'd give some examples of the horribly awkward analogies, but I can't stand to go back and listen again. (I picked up on the "walrus locomotives" one of the other critical reviewers caught, though I thought it just bad writing and the other reviewer points out it's a bad fact, that walruses don't even live in that area). There's stuff that's just wrong. The author states that after the first frost the ground will be iron hard. If you've ever lived with winter, there's quite a long period between the first frost and the ground freezing solidly, and unless you're in permafrost, the ground only will freeze a few feet deep, so you won't need to build a fire at the bottom of a deep shaft to thaw the earth there. I could go on and on, but several Alaskans have reviewed the book and done a fine job of pointing out some of the many mistakes and factual errors in the book. Their reviews are well worth reading before you buy.

    I am intensely offended by a book which claims to be a true story and isn't! We're dumb enough as a society without being misled by lazy, slapdash writers. If you're writing about the Yukon gold rush, or a fascinating character like Siringo and you aren't imaginative enough tell an exciting story without using distortions and fabrications, you should be writing some vacuous potboiler. Plenty of people will enjoy it, and no one will mistakenly think they are learning anything.

    This book does a real and inexcusable disservice to the legacy of Charles Siringo. Inexcusable, because even the smallest amount of research shows him to be a far more intelligent, complex, and interesting character than can be imagined by his portrayal in the "Floor of Heaven". Prior to joining the Pinkerton agency, Siringo had already written an extremely popular book about his experiences as a cowboy. He joined the Pinkertons out of his deeply held political concerns with the growing Anarchist movement, spent undercover time with the Hole in the Wall gang, defended Clarance Darrow from a mob, was present at much of the terrible anti-union strife in the western mines, and ended up writing several more books, one of which was a scathing condemnation of the tactics of both the Pinkerton agency and the union organizations. In Blum's book he comes across as a drunken, whale shooting dolt, casually selling liquor to the Native tribes when it forwards his own narrow ends. I'm not saying I think Siringo was a good guy, (I don't know, and can't trust any facts in this book), but he is a character who should be easy to mine for literary gold, and all Blum manages to pan from the such rich history is a little gravel and horse manure. And that's not even addressing the other two main characters.

    I gave the reader an extra star. He was laboring under a heavy burden and I respect him for getting all the way through.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Bridge of Sighs

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 18 mins)
    • By Olen Steinhauer
    • Narrated By Ned Schmidtke
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (70)
    Performance
    (30)
    Story
    (29)

    In the volatile and shifting political atmosphere of Eastern Europe after World War II, an inexperienced homicide detective fresh out of the academy is assigned a crime that no one wants to solve. Set in a bombed-out city in an unnamed country formerly occupied by the Germans and now by the Russians, the story follows Emil Brod as he unravels the threads of the cover-up of a brutal murder, while supporting his grandparents, his only family, in the equally brutal city.

    Stevon says: "an interesting listen"
    "A satisfactory noir thriller"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I listened to Steinhauer's "Milo Weaver" series a few months ago. I can't say I enjoyed "The Bridge of Sighs" as much, but it was still a good listen. If you want fast paced action, or steamy sex scenes, this isn't a book for you, but if you enjoy escaping into post WW2 central Europe and a grim noir, early cold war setting this book may do that. For me, Steinhauer has not mastered the genre as well as Alan Furst, but he is in the running with David Downing or Phillip Kerr.

    The book suffers from being set in an unnamed country. I suppose that takes pressure off the author, who is not forced to work within a set of historic events as a novelist working in a real setting must. And, the characters were a bit thin, but had enough personality to keep me interested. Still, if there were a little more back story included for the main characters it might have been a much richer listen.

    I give the performance a qualified four stars. When I come across a male reader who can interpret a woman's voice in a way that doesn't grate, they will be lauded with five stars and a rave review. Ned Schmidtke, unfortunately is not that reader, and his voices for the various characters are somewhat limited, and I found it a little hard to distinguish between the characters, sometimes.

    Altogether, not a bad job, but if you like this genre, and haven't experienced them, I'd recomment Alan Furst's work, or for that matter Martin Cruz Smith's "Arkady Renko" series over this book.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Winterkill: Joe Pickett, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By C. J. Box
    • Narrated By David Chandler
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (227)
    Performance
    (208)
    Story
    (207)

    In the third adventure in C. J. Box’s engrossing series, Joe Pickett finds himself at the center of a confrontation between a special investigative team and a group of government-hating survivalists camped out on federal land. With the help of a mysterious stranger, Joe lays his life on the line to protect an innocent girl before a wave of violence surges over the Bighorn Mountains.

    Vickie Oakley says: "I can not seem to put it down!"
    "You might want to save your credit."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I can't really believe I made it through this book. If I hadn't had a long day of mind numbing, tedious chores it wouldn't have happened.

    So what's wrong with "Winterkill"? Shallow characters, a scattershot plot line, unbelievable technical details, descriptive phrases that made me cringe, and a marginal reader.

    The book seems to start out OK, an interesting premise, a beautiful location and steps in a big pile before the first scene is even over. I mean, if a character is so drunk he can't tell cigarets from bullets it isn't likely he can shoot well enough drop seven fleeing elk, but maybe...and I'd really like to see someone remove a steering wheel with just a leatherman tool, but still..., and then, our intrepid hero tracks the escaped bad guy through the snow, realizes the villain must be hiding behind a tree because the tracks stop at the tree, then, lo and behold, finds the fellow pinned to the other side of the tree by two arrows with..... his throat cut, (by the longest armed murderer in the history of crime literature?). No.

    Add to this a description of the rugged, silent, tortured, sidekick's enormous revolver that is nearly pornographic, then later in the, just in case you missed it, he describes it again in the same orgasmic tones. Ugh.

    Now include a well stereotyped, bitchy female victim, a schizophrenic attitude toward a group of separatists, (They're worth admiring- they can escape from a shootout in a fleet of old motorhomes and campers, down a forest road which the authorities could only navigate in snowcats and on snowmobiles, Wish I could drive like that), and a host of characters who are only memorable because they aren't.

    To be fair to the narrator, he didn't have a lot to work with, but it would have been easier to keep track of the players if he didn't use the same voice for the stalwart sidekick and the evil FBI agent. And, while this is unfair, I just didn't like his voice, he sounded like an extremely "untough" character trying hard to sound tough. Not really something he could help, but it was distracting.

    I admire anyone who can write well enough that other people want to read his work, (I certainly can't), and a lot of people like to read Mr. Box's work, so I realize that my opinion is likely to be challenged. If you like this style, go for it, but if you're looking for an intelligent, well crafted, western mystery, approach this book with caution.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Captain's Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy SEALs, and Dangerous Days at Sea

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Richard Phillips, Stephan Talty
    • Narrated By George K. Wilson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (344)
    Performance
    (302)
    Story
    (300)

    It was just another day on the job for 53-year-old Richard Phillips, captain of the Maersk Alabama, a United States-flagged cargo ship that was carrying, among other things, food and agricultural materials for the World Food Program. That all changed when armed Somali pirates boarded the ship.

    AudioAddict says: "Pirates of the ... Gulf of Aden"
    "This book could have been so much more."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I bought this book through a 2 for 1 deal, and it is worth half its list price, but not more. It's a very topical treatment of the piracy incident; I'm sure there's some way to make a good nautical pun about it being shallow, for it is.

    Captain Phillips, his life, and his family are mildly interesting, so this is a mildly interesting book. An examination of the modern merchant marine: the sailors, their culture, and their lives; the ships: their cargoes, machinery, the dangers of the sea: piracy, modern and historic, the extremity of the culture which creates and tolerates piracy, the lives and families of the pirates; the Navy: its mission regarding piracy, its tactics, the lives and training of the sailors; and finally the economics and politics of modern day piracy; any or all of these topics could be covered in light of this particular incident and would make fascinating reading. Unfortunately, none of these issues are covered, other than in a very shallow, cursory fashion.

    I found myself bored, skipping through the book. It's an OK true story about a fascinating incident and if you're focused on Captain Phillips, it does a good job of telling you who he is, where he was, and what he did. But that story is just not all that engrossing, at least not 8 hours worth of engrossing, and I find myself frustrated, deeply curious, and disappointed by this book.

    The reading is very adequate, but not inspired. It complements the book well.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Brown Dog: Novellas

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 10 mins)
    • By Jim Harrison
    • Narrated By Bronson Pinchot, Ray Porter, Lloyd James
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (57)
    Performance
    (52)
    Story
    (52)

    New York Times best-selling author Jim Harrison is one of America's most beloved writers, and of all his creations, Brown Dog - a bawdy, reckless, down-on-his-luck Michigan Indian - has earned cult status with readers in the more than two decades since his first appearance. For the first time, Brown Dog gathers all the Brown Dog novellas, including one never before published, into one volume - the ideal introduction (or reintroduction) to Harrison's irresistible Everyman.

    Dr. says: "What a Hoot!"
    "A pleasant read....for guys"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Well, the performers were pretty marginal. The first reader either couldn't read, or was trying to give the impression that Brown Dog, the main character was learning disabled, (BD certainly is not!) One of the later readers was so ignorant of rural life that he pronounced "mow", as in "The hay mow in the barn" as "moe", like "mow the grass". Are there no editors?

    I enjoyed the sedately paced story of a free man dealing with the modern world. It is set in the same country, rivers and woods as Hemingway's "Nick Adams" short stories, but several generations later and from a very different, but oddly sympathetic viewpoint. The stories did nice job of taking me to the deep woods of the Upper Peninsula, with their natural beauty and the idiosyncratic characters who inhabit them, and showing me the world through the eyes of a man with far fewer inhibitions than I. Because I found Brown Dog"s view rather appealing, I'd be a little wary of recommending this as a good read to my very feminist wife. I might well get in trouble for even identifying with, much less, rather liking Brown Dog. A good, if not great book. Well worth the time and money.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Waterloo

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Bernard Cornwell
    • Narrated By Frederick Davidson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (419)
    Performance
    (219)
    Story
    (216)

    With the emperor Napoleon at its head, an enormous French army is marching toward Brussels. The British and their allies are also converging on Brussels - in preparation for a grand society ball. And it is up to Richard Sharpe to convince the Prince of Orange to act before it is too late. In this, the culmination of Sharpe's long and arduous career, Bernard Cornwell brings to life all the horror and all the exhilaration of one of the greatest military triumphs of all time.

    Michael Cox says: "Spell binding"
    "Good old Sharpe"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    In the Sharpe series, Bernard Cornwell sort of writes one book again and again and does it very, very well. Even if the plot line is predictable, I find these stories, with their charismatic heroes and evil villains very enjoyable and I really appreciate Cornwell's research and attention to historical detail.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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