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Janice

Rating scale: 5=Loved it, 4=Liked it, 3=Ok, 2=Disappointed, 1=Hated it. I look for well developed characters, compelling stories.

Sugar Land, TX, United States | Member Since 2010

ratings
231
REVIEWS
180
FOLLOWING
4
FOLLOWERS
405
HELPFUL VOTES
1536

  • Run: A Thriller

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Blake Crouch
    • Narrated By Phil Gigante
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (349)
    Performance
    (324)
    Story
    (320)

    Five days ago a rash of bizarre murders swept the country. Senseless. Brutal. Seemingly unconnected. A cop walked into a nursing home and unloaded his weapons on elderly and staff alike. A mass of school shootings. Prison riots of unprecedented brutality. Mind-boggling acts of violence in every state. Four Days Ago the murders increased ten-fold. Three days ago the President addressed the nation and begged for calm and peace. Two days ago the killers began to mobilize. Yesterday all the power went out. Tonight....

    Jacqueline says: "Violent, Depressing, Mostly Sci Fi"
    "Who are those guys. . ."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    At one point as the Colclough family are driving as fast as they can but unable to shake the headlights behind them, I thought of the immortal words of Butch Cassidy - Who ARE those guys?

    This is a breakneck speed thriller that is nearly impossible to put down as this family runs nonstop from the relentless pursuit of who-knows-who. I devoured it almost in one sitting. But it's not for everybody - I had to wonder more than once why I was sticking with it. It is extraordinarily violent, far more than I would usually tolerate. But I just had to find out how the family could possibly escape and what the hell was causing all of the mayhem.

    I can't give it 5 stars for reasons others have already pointed out: the wife's annoying complaints at her husband which blessedly subsided once she had to be the one making the decisions for a while. The daughter could also be a bit of a pill instead of just keeping her head down and doing what she was told. The narrator was just ok, with not so ok voicing of women and kids, and strange accents (Irish sounded Australian, north westerners sounded like bad imitations of deep south). I will give the overall score a 4 for keeping me on the edge of my seat, but for some missteps in the story just a 3. The final chapter offers what explanation we will ever get for the chaos. Each will have to decide if it's enough.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • The Haunting of Hill House

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By Shirley Jackson
    • Narrated By Bernadette Dunne
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (385)
    Performance
    (327)
    Story
    (333)

    Four seekers have come to the ugly, abandoned old mansion: Dr. Montague, an occult scholar looking for solid evidence of the psychic phenomenon called haunting; Theodora, his lovely and lighthearted assistant; Eleanor, a lonely, homeless girl well acquainted with poltergeists; and Luke, the adventurous future heir of Hill House.

    Mark says: "Superb Reading of Horror Classic"
    "A Disappointment"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I really wanted to like this story. I enjoy a good ghost story that is more on the psychologically spooky side (as opposed to the slasher, gory side), and thought this would fit the bill nicely. But the handling of the characters consistently got in the way of the atmosphere. The problems:

    • None of the subjects participating in this expedition to the haunted house seemed to be serious about actually trying to discover its secrets. They moved in, experienced the strange phenomena, but afterwards never even discussed among themselves what had happened or even seemed terribly surprised or concerned. We were told they wrote copious notes, but they never seemed to go anywhere.

    • The too-clever, ironic conversations felt contrived and out of place. Perhaps the wry humor was meant to be a sort of whistling-in-the-dark, but it didn't work for me.

    • The crazy bangings and door slammings, voices and wall writings are all sensory events that are difficult to convey in writing with the impact they deserve. Perhaps the impact would have been heightened if the characters themselves had seemed to be more viscerally affected. But they all just got over it a few minutes later, looked for the brandy and made more jokes. I have seen the 1963 film version, and found it satisfyingly spooky, largely because the actors were able to convince me that they were scared themselves.

    • I found Dr. Montague’s wife to be one of the single most irritating characters I have ever read. Worse, her nearly comical militant spiritualist crusade further weakened Dr. Montague’s already weak character, undermining any pretense of scientific authority he held.

    I wish I could recommend this classic, but for me it did not live up to its billing.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Freeze Frame: The Enzo Files, Book 4

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Peter May
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    Overall
    (47)
    Performance
    (32)
    Story
    (32)

    A promise made to a dying man leads forensics ace Enzo Macleod (a Scot who's been teaching in France for many years) to the study—a place the man's heir has preserved for nearly 20 years. The dead man left several clues there designed to reveal his killer's identity to the man's son, but ironically the son died soon after the father.

    adrienne says: "Another cold case solved!"
    "Solid writing, reliable series"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This was another reliable entry in the Enzo series. The mystery is interesting and well strung together. I found the handling of the clues creative and intriguing, allowing me to play along with Enzo’s problem solving process, and even though I had figured out who-dunnit, I didn't mind because the scavenger hunt to get there was worth the trip. Enzo remains an engaging and full-blooded character, in this outing working without the entourage of his daughters and their boyfriends, but that was ok. I enjoyed the atmospheric Breton island location and the people he met there. My only complaint is the subplot involving sometime love interest, Charlotte, who was uncharacteristically surly, leaving a relationship cliffhanger that left a bad taste in my mouth. I’m sure there will be a resolution of sorts in future volumes, but I just didn't like the way this one faded out, but not so much as to lose the recommendation.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Son

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Philipp Meyer
    • Narrated By Will Patton, Kate Mulgrew, Scott Shepherd, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1237)
    Performance
    (1105)
    Story
    (1125)

    Part epic of Texas, part classic coming-of-age story, part unflinching portrait of the bloody price of power, The Son is an utterly transporting novel that maps the legacy of violence in the American West through the lives of the McCulloughs, an ambitious family as resilient and dangerous as the land they claim. Spring, 1849: Eli McCullough is 13 years old when a marauding band of Comanches takes him captive. Brave and clever, Eli quickly adapts to life among the Comanches, learning their ways and waging war against their enemies, including white men - which complicates his sense of loyalty and understanding of who he is.

    Melinda says: "Five Stars for the Lone Star, The Son, & Meyer"
    "Morally bankrupt dynasty"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    “There were people who ate the earth and those that stood around and watched them do it.”

    So said Lillian Hellman in “The Little Foxes”, and the quote is apt for the McCullough dynasty in “The Son”. For all of its ambition to present a sweeping epic of Texas history through the eyes of three generational representatives, these three characters came across as soulless and selfish, with no clear motivations for their lives, simply grasping for what they could acquire no matter the cost or who had to pay it – generally the Mexicans and other family members.

    Eli’s story is admittedly the most colorful, with his abduction by the Comanches, his life with them, and afterwards in the Texas Rangers and the Confederate Army. But none of it ever felt as adventurous as expected. Much of it was just gruesome and murderous, but quite emotionless, even for the victims. The ease with which he changed allegiances, killing without conscience the enemy of the moment, spoke of a man with no soul or direction. Love was just as empty, expressed almost exclusively in sophomoric sexual terms (and too often with barnyard vocabulary).

    Peter (Eli’s son) and Jeannie (Eli’s great granddaughter) each eventually inherit to various degrees the empire, but exist only through the prism of Eli’s life – Peter hating him and Jeannie mythologizing him. Neither ever feel adequate with themselves, so they are weak and inadequate characters, and I found them essentially sterile. Lacking heartfelt emotions, I felt nothing for them. All background characters were just that: background and generally one-dimensional, too often stereotyped.

    Narration – 2/3’s good. Patton and Shepherd did well with Eli and Peter. Kate Mulgrew to my ears was grating and rough, trying too hard to portray a tough Texas gal, which just came across as a whiskey roughened broad, often indistinguishable from the male voices.

    I know this is a dissenting vote – most reviewers loved the book. I felt it was cynical and spoke to the futility of life spent only on building dynasties and not relationships. I'll give it three stars for ambition and many of the well written passages, but I found little inspiring or uplifting to recommend it.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 22 mins)
    • By Neil Gaiman
    • Narrated By Neil Gaiman
    Overall
    (26)
    Performance
    (26)
    Story
    (25)

    You ask me if I can forgive myself? I can forgive myself. And so begins The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains, a haunting story of family, the otherworld, and a search for hidden treasure. This audiobook is brought to vivid life by the characters and landscape of Gaiman’s award-winning story. In this volume, the talents and vision of two great creative geniuses come together in a glorious explosion of color and shadow, memory and regret, vengeance and, ultimately, love.

    Melinda says: "Just for the experience"
    "Dark Quest"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a dark short story told in first person by an un-named man going on a quest to the Black Mountains. He hires a guide to take him there, disclosing little of himself or his reason for the journey. His tale unfolds slowly, bit by bit as the two travelors encounter challenges along the way, not fully trusting each other, but needing to rely on each other anyway. This slow buildup initially felt like nothing was really going on, but have patience. As pieces of each man's stories are revealed, the tension begins to mount right up to the opening of the mountain cave which is their destination. And then, as the title suggests, there is the truth.

    It pains me to give anyting less than 5 stars to a Gaiman recording, but in this case it's not because of his narration, which is perfection as always. There is a musical score that plays throughout the story that often becomes more than just background. The listener's sample gives you some idea of the music. There are some parts that are more intrusive, but also many parts where the music benefits the atmosphere. But the fact that the score made itself so obvious lost one star.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • The Graveyard Book

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Neil Gaiman
    • Narrated By Neil Gaiman
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (6415)
    Performance
    (3198)
    Story
    (3218)

    Why we think it’s a great listen: Gaiman’s not just an award-winning author, but a narrator who earns rave reviews – and fields requests from other authors to perform their books, too! Nobody Owens, known to his friends as Bod, is a normal boy. He would be completely normal if he didn't live in a sprawling graveyard, being raised and educated by ghosts, with a solitary guardian who belongs to neither the world of the living nor of the dead....

    Guillermo says: "Masterful Fantasy for the Jaded Heart"
    "The other Boy Who Lived"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    What a wonderful story. Something for everyone – adventure, mystery, humor, creepiness. Enjoyable for adults in the way of the best literature for young people such as Peter Pan, Harry Potter and (not surprisingly) The Jungle Book. Good coming-of-age stories remind us grown-ups of who we once were and of the dreams and hopes we once had for ourselves and our belief that we could accomplish anything - before the "real world" teaches us not to believe in magic anymore. Gaiman is a Pied Piper of storytelling for all ages, and as always gives voice to his creations as no one else could. The added musical interludes enhanced the atmosphere. I long to know what Bod’s life became, but suspect that a sequel would not really be in order. Better to let us imagine.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Pontoon: A Novel of Lake Wobegon

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Garrison Keillor
    • Narrated By Garrison Keillor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (643)
    Performance
    (386)
    Story
    (387)

    Garrison Keillor's latest book is about the wedding of a girl named Dede Ingebretson, who comes home from California with a guy named Brent. Dede has made a fortune in veterinary aromatherapy; Brent bears a strong resemblance to a man wanted for extortion who's pictured on a poster in the town's post office. Then there's the memorial service for Dede's aunt Evelyn, who led a footloose and adventurous life after the death of her husband 17 years previously.

    A User says: "Brillliant but not lighthearted"
    "Geezer-Lit . . . in a good way"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Is there such a category as “geezer-lit”? If not, this book could start a new literary genre as I expect only those over the age of 50 have sufficient life experience to appreciate the humor and insights that make this wonderful tale hilarious, poignant, wise and affectionate all at the same time.

    Introduced to Evelyn on the last evening of her life, enjoying a somewhat raucous dinner with her best friends, I was laughing so hard I had to pee. Then she was gone and her daughter Barbara had to pick up the pieces and plan Evelyn’s unique memorial according to instructions left in a wonderful letter that actually begins Barbara’s awakening (and ours too if we have the ears to hear).

    There are other story lines that are outrageous and revealing in their own ways, but it’s Evelyn’s spirit winding through the tale that keeps some grounded, some inspired, and often both at the same time. As one rapidly reaching geezer-hood, I enjoyed the connection to family and community, and the message of living life to its fullest on your own terms. Life has no dress rehearsal and once the curtain comes down the play is over and regrets are wasted time. That message was Evelyn’s best gift to Barbara.

    GK’s reading has his usual quirky pauses and breaths, and it took at bit to get used to. But really, there is no other voice that can tell a Lake Wobegon tale. It was a perfect match.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Legends of the Fall

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 23 mins)
    • By Jim Harrison
    • Narrated By Mark Bramhall
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (11)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    Set in the Rocky Mountains, Legends of the Fall is the epic tale of three brothers and their lives of passion, madness, exploration, and danger at the beginning of World War I. In Revenge, love causes the course of a man's life to be savagely and irrevocably altered. And in The Man Who Gave Up His Name, a man named Nordstrom is unable to relinquish his consuming obsessions with women, dancing, and food.

    Janice says: "Cello music"
    "Cello music"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I chose this book because I have watched “Legends of the Fall” movie countless times, and because Mark Bramhall is one of my favorite narrators. Ranking the three novellas, I thought “Legends” was the best overall story, “Revenge” the one that affected me the deepest, and “The Man Who Gave Up His Name” the least relatable (making it 4 stars instead of 5). If you are already familiar with “Legends” and “Revenge” from their movies, know that the source stories told here are not straight repeats, but still wonderfully written. “Revenge” in particular provided strong characters in Cochran and Tibby.

    Strongly masculine tales, there is a common thread of midlife self-doubt and sense of loss that could become depressing if Harrison’s writing was less masterful. If the stories had a soundtrack, it would be the beautiful but melancholy music of the cello – expressing a soulful yearning that communicates to the reader. Bramhall's reading ensures the cello is pitch perfect. I loved the stories, admired the writing, and will likely look for more of Harrison’s offerings.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Watching You

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Michael Robotham
    • Narrated By Sean Barrett
    Overall
    (355)
    Performance
    (321)
    Story
    (322)

    Marnie Logan often feels like she's being watched: A warm breath on the back of her neck, or a shadow in the corner of her eye that vanishes when she turns her head. She has reason to be frightened. Her husband Daniel has inexplicably vanished, and the police have no leads in the case. Without proof of death or evidence of foul play, she can't access his bank accounts or his life insurance. Depressed and increasingly desperate, she seeks the help of clinical psychologist Joe O'Loughlin.

    bernadette says: "Wow!"
    "Something missing"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The mystery/thriller genre can be fairly forgiving as long as the characters have dimension and the plot is suspenseful with twists that play fair with readers willing to suspend disbelief. “Watching You” does pretty well with the plot end of the bargain, but not so well with the characters.

    On the positive side, there is plenty of suspense, the solution to the mystery not being obvious. In the interest of no spoilers, I can’t say much about the plot points, but thought and creativity have been put into the story structure. Don’t assume that your first impressions will hold up to the end. I like a story that can surprise me.

    Oddly, in spite of the suspense I felt more curiosity than urgency about solving the mystery. Perhaps because this is my first outing with the O’Laughlin series I have missed the character build-up of Joe and Ruiz, who were not well defined. Regarding Joe, for a psychologist concerned about sharing confidential patient information, he sure spilled it out easily enough to Ruiz. And I found his Parkinson’s disease to be a gimmick that added nothing to who he is or to this story. As for the rest of the cast, often personality felt more governed by plot needs than by realistic responses.

    So bottom line, this was a credible mystery with twists that were interesting if not edge-of-my-seat compelling. I just felt the characters were kept too far at a distance to get my adrenaline running for them.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Lillian and Dash: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Sam Toperoff
    • Narrated By Mark Bramhall, Lorna Raver, Bernadette Dunne
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    This exciting novel about Dashiell Hammett, author of The Maltese Falcon and The Thin Man, and Lillian Hellman, author of The Children’s Hour, reintroduces their larger-than-life personalities and the vicissitudes of their affair that spanned three decades.

    Janice says: "Talented but flawed"
    "Talented but flawed"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I chose this book to get some insight into the creative minds behind stories I know best through the Hollywood renditions of their best works – Watch on the Rhine, The Little Foxes, The Thin Man, The Maltese Falcon. I got background stories, but for most of the book there was an unexpected distance that kept the writers from becoming flesh and blood. Part of the problem was that for much of the book they remained apart from each other, their stories told in parallel. That may have been unavoidable since their relationship did have long separations, but life was not well infused even when they came together. The other part of the problem had to do with the narration.

    I have enjoyed all three of these readers in previous selections, and their presence influenced me to download this book. But the producers made a curious choice about the narration assignments. The wonderful Mark Bramhall gave Hammett his voice and was by far the best part of the listening. But Bernadette Dunn as Lillian, and Lorna Raver as the overall narrator sounded too much alike to let Hellman sound distinctive. And because Raver narrated the largely third person voice, the sections dealing with Hammett’s life were read in the voice of an elderly woman. Raver is a very talented reader, and I have loved her in other outings, but her voice made it impossible to hear Lillian as a young woman in her 20’s and 30’s, and Hammett was just lost until Bramhall read his own words. It has been hard to choose a rating for the narration because all three read extremely well. The problems were in the production choices.

    The very end of the book, the final years of their devotion to each other finally brought Dash and Lily to life for me. The voices finally matched their ages, and the lovers were finally together. It raised the book from being mediocre to good if a bit flawed.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Those Who Wish Me Dead

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Michael Koryta
    • Narrated By Robert Petkoff
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (163)
    Performance
    (150)
    Story
    (150)

    When 13-year-old Jace Wilson witnesses a brutal murder, he's plunged into a new life, issued a false identity and hidden in a wilderness skills program for troubled teens. The plan is to get Jace off the grid while police find the two killers. The result is the start of a nightmare. The killers, known as the Blackwell Brothers, are slaughtering anyone who gets in their way in a methodical quest to reach him.

    Jen says: "Best Bad Guys EVER!"
    "Fire on the Mountain"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As a genre thrillers too often favor action and plot over character development, resulting in a library full of books populated by cardboard heroes and villains. Koryta consistently defies that norm and creates characters that we can invest in emotionally, simultaneously placing them in nail-biting situations. “Those Who Wish Me Dead” is one of his finest with an opening scene that informs us immediately of the deadly seriousness of young Jace’s situation. From that scene forward, the rest of the cast is introduced, and every one of them, good or bad, are drawn with a fine touch. My stomach clenched every time the Blackwell brothers appeared, knowing the cold blooded violence they brought with them. The wilderness instructor and his wife are very good but very human and vulnerable because, in spite of knowing of Jace’s danger, they underestimated the level of evil they faced. Fire on the mountain both compounds their problems and offers unforeseen hope.

    The pace is non-stop, and I actually didn’t stop, listening in one long sitting. Koryta never shies away from letting some bad things happen to some of his characters, disdaining improbably coincidental saves. So you never know what’s coming, the tension never lets up. In true Koryta fashion, the ultimate hero of the story will hold your heart. A strong place to start for readers who have not read this author before.

    8 of 9 people found this review helpful

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