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George

New Orleans, LA, United States | Member Since 2012

5
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 3 reviews
  • 18 ratings
  • 107 titles in library
  • 1 purchased in 2015
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  • The Elephant and the Dragon: The Rise of India and China, and What It Means for All of Us

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Robyn Meredith
    • Narrated By Laural Merlington
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (296)
    Performance
    (63)
    Story
    (63)

    Exotic India is as near as the voice answering an 800 number for one dollar an hour. Communist China is as close as the nearest Wal-Mart, its shelves full of goods made in Chinese factories. But India and China are vastly different nations, with opposing economic and political strategies - strategies we must understand to survive in the new global economy. The Elephant and the Dragon explains how these nations have spurred a new "gold rush", and what this will mean for the rest of the world.

    R. Reed says: "Confused and not scholarly"
    "Some interesting discussion"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

    This book had some interesting portions.
    The summary of the industrialization of India is concise, solid, and compelling in a fact-y way. In addition, the discussion of the supply chains of modern goods is interesting and vivid.

    The rest of the book is fairly forgettable. There is little original research nor are any interesting theses proposed. The writing is competent but not terribly engaging.

    I recommend it if you are very interested in one of the above subjects. Otherwise take a pass.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20: A Crash Course on Making Your Place in the World

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Tina Seelig
    • Narrated By Chris Fogg
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (29)
    Performance
    (25)
    Story
    (25)

    As executive director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, Tina Seelig guides her students as they make the difficult transition from the academic environment to the professional world, providing tangible skills and insights that will last a lifetime. Seelig is an entrepreneur, neuroscientist, and popular teacher, and in What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20 she shares with us what she offers her students' - provocative stories, inspiring advice, and a big dose of humility and humor.

    Babak says: "Not worth it for most"
    "Great first chapter. Stop there"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What disappointed you about What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20?

    The first chapter had some interesting allegories that are both inspiring and thought provoking, then Ms Seelig seems to run out of steam.

    At one point she actually brags that she is not qualified to write a book but is doing it anyways.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Why the West Rules - for Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future

    • UNABRIDGED (24 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Ian Morris
    • Narrated By Antony Ferguson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (98)
    Performance
    (67)
    Story
    (67)

    Sometime around 1750, English entrepreneurs unleashed the astounding energies of steam and coal, and the world was forever changed. The emergence of factories, railroads, and gunboats propelled the West’s rise to power in the nineteenth century, and the development of computers and nuclear weapons in the 20th century secured its global supremacy.

    George says: "I bought it hardcopy"
    "I bought it hardcopy"
    Overall

    I was so impressed with Ian Morris' viewpoint and breadth that I purchased the hardcopy to re-read and share with friends. As the cover says, this is possibly the closest we'll ever come to a grand unified theory of history. Even more enjoyable if you're familiar with the basics of complexity theory as his arguments (seemingly unintentionally) flow very much along those lines.

    The only quibble - and this is a minor one - is that there is significant discussion of various diagrams throughout the book This of course doesn't come across in the audio-format however they are generally explained well enough to be not completely lost.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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