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GP

amboise

Member Since 2011

ratings
209
REVIEWS
30
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
3
HELPFUL VOTES
47

  • The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By Robert A. Heinlein
    • Narrated By Lloyd James
    Overall
    (2974)
    Performance
    (1789)
    Story
    (1813)

    In what is considered one of Heinlein's most hair-raising, thought-provoking, and outrageous adventures, the master of modern science fiction tells the strange story of an even stranger world. It is 21st-century Luna, a harsh penal colony where a revolt is plotted between a bashful computer and a ragtag collection of maverick humans, a revolt that goes beautifully until the inevitable happens. But that's the problem with the inevitable: it always happens.

    Peter says: "Heinlein's Masterpiece"
    "Wears very well with time"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Often when I've picked up a science fiction novel that I enjoyed in the past, I find it's just too dated both in technology and in character that it no longer works for me. I've read this book before, but probably at least 30 years ago. I loved it then, and I was pleased to find that I love it just as much now, if not more.
    Lloyd James performs the narration narration extremely well, with just the right tone for all the characters. Although written in 1966, it wears time well. You can understand the references to nation states and political thought of the time, but it's also as easy to just go with the story without reference to the past. Of course, even the expectations of technology weren't on the mark, it doesn't matter to the story, in spite of one of the main characters actually being a computer.
    Well written, wonderful characters and story.
    Stranger in a Strange Land, also written by Heinlein, has long been one of my favorite books. I think Moon has climbed up that list after this listening.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs)
    • By Jonas Jonasson
    • Narrated By Steven Crossley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1718)
    Performance
    (1534)
    Story
    (1553)

    After a long and eventful life, Allan Karlsson ends up in a nursing home, believing it to be his last stop. The only problem is that he's still in good health, and in one day, he turns 100. A big celebration is in the works, but Allan really isn't interested (and he'd like a bit more control over his vodka consumption). So he decides to escape. He climbs out the window in his slippers and embarks on a hilarious and entirely unexpected journey, involving, among other surprises, a suitcase stuffed with cash.

    Sylvia says: "Full of Surprises and Unexpected Events"
    "Forest Gump without the heart"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I know this is a lightweight piece of work, and as such it's okay. But I would have liked to care something about the characters and understood why they were doing what they did.

    The main character seems to have been everywhere and met everyone, but other than just blindly going with the flow, even though he was central, he didn't really play much of a role in his own story. I think a garden gnome might have worked as well.

    Not bad, but I didn't feel it was worth all the high marks.
    The reader though was excellent! I think what I enjoyed about the book was made possible by Crossley's reading of the story.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (26 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Haruki Murakami
    • Narrated By Rupert Degas
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (183)
    Performance
    (167)
    Story
    (168)

    In a Tokyo suburb a young man named Toru Okada searches for his wife's missing cat.... Soon he finds himself looking for his wife as well in a netherworld that lies beneath the placid surface of Tokyo. As these searches intersect, Okada encounters a bizarre group of allies and antagonists: a psychic prostitute; a malevolent yet mediagenic politician; a cheerfully morbid 16-year-old-girl; and an aging war veteran who has been permanently changed by the hideous things he witnessed during Japan's forgotten campaign in Manchuria.

    Darwin8u says: "A Huge, Heavy, Creepy, Cool Murakami"
    "The scenic tour"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I'm terrible at literary criticism. I think I read more from my emotional side than analytic side. So having said that...

    The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle was like taking a long, leisurely drive on a windy and scenic road with someone else in the driver's seat. Here and there the scenery transfixes, and you slow down to take a more careful look. Other places the curves are tight and you look over the edge to the abyss, and thankfully have confidence that the driver will keep to the road.

    This is my second Haruki Murakami novel, the first being IQ84. I had no idea what I was getting into with the IQ84. With The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle I was more prepared. The story is part absolutely mundane and part completely surreal with words that make it all flow together.

    I don't know why I like these books, but I do. In a way I enjoyed this more than IQ84. In both there is violence, however surreal and fictional (in both senses of the word). But The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle is more of a journey, like a road, that leads you from one place to the next. There is clearly a hero and a villain. Well, clearly in the Haruki Murakami sense of the world.

    The story's narrator Toru Okada is also an observer, but he has faith in the outcome and his intentions are clear. He's willing to take whatever path is shown to him, and finds a few of his own making. Those around him share their stories while paving the way, or create diversions that may or may not help him on his way. Sometimes The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, made me feel like Alice in Wonderland, in more ways than just the disappearing cats.

    The reader did a wonderful job.

    If you can go along for the ride, the journey is quite lovely.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Vows of Silence: Simon Serrailler 4

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Susan Hill
    • Narrated By Steven Pacey
    Overall
    (111)
    Performance
    (78)
    Story
    (79)

    Gunmen are terrorising young women in the Cathedral town of Lafferton. What - if anything - links the apparently random murders? Is the marksman with a rifle the same person as the killer with a handgun? Detective Chief Superintendent Simon Serrailler falls back on well tried police methods such as questioning neighbours and house-to-house searches.

    Ruth says: "taut writing, narrator perfect - read in order!!!"
    "No one is safe with Susan Hill"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    First, I have to say I love the Simon Serrailler series. I've read them all and even make myself wait a while between books so that there is still another left to read. I hope she continues to write them. This review is less a review of a single book than a review up to the point in the series to which I have read (#5).

    The actual crime and workings of the police are the primary subject of the stories, but the various characters that Hill introduces play large roles and are not simply peripheral to this or future stories. Simon's family is also a large part each book, and they go about their lives sharing moments and thoughts with you even when they are only on the perimeter of a particular book.

    Yet, unlike most novelists, no character is sacred to the story or the series. Characters that one would expect to endure, simply because of their proximity to and importance to the main character, drop like flies leaving pain, anguish and general unhappiness in their wake. In fiction it seems no one is left but the main character, or everyone the main character holds dear is safe with few exceptions. Not so Susan Hill. Don't get too attached to any of the series regular characters, there is no safety. Danger and illness lurk at every corner.

    In spite of this lack of security, there is joy and normality in every novel. Evil does not lurk in every nook and cranny. General day to day activities and troubles come up. No one is perfect. No one is unredeemable (excepting possibly the criminal in the case).

    The narrator reads perfectly and brings the story to life.

    I love these books, even though I love happy endings. I suppose because they are so much like real life in the disappointment of events, yet the continuity of day to day life continues to move on and past the tragedy.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Sara Gran
    • Narrated By Carol Monda
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (401)
    Performance
    (339)
    Story
    (337)

    Claire DeWitt is not your average private investigator. She has brilliant skills of deduction and is an ace at discovering evidence. But Claire also uses her dreams, omens, and mind-expanding herbs to help her solve mysteries, and relies on Détection—the only book published by the great and mysterious French detective Jacques Silette before his death.

    A. D. Mcrae says: "Mostly Disappointed but it was Quick"
    "The narrator makes this book enjoyable"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I think if I'd read this story, instead of listening, I probably wouldn't have made it more than half way. The main character is seriously flawed, egocentric, and enjoys her drugs a little too much. Although in this story a little recreational drug use actually helped the story along. Go figure.

    Claire's method of deduction is basically if you stumble about enough, and jump to enough conclusions, the truth will appear. Probably in a dream helped along by a lot of really good weed.

    It's hard to like Claire, but she is an interesting character, and can speak a witty phrase. She's also got a surprise or two along the way.

    I don't know if I'll pick up another by this author, but definitely would enjoy something else read by this narrator.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Windup Girl

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Paolo Bacigalupi
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3536)
    Performance
    (1923)
    Story
    (1934)

    Anderson Lake is a company man, AgriGen's Calorie Man in Thailand. Under cover as a factory manager, Anderson combs Bangkok's street markets in search of foodstuffs thought to be extinct, hoping to reap the bounty of history's lost calories. There, he encounters Emiko...Emiko is the Windup Girl, a strange and beautiful creature. One of the New People, Emiko is not human; instead, she is an engineered being, creche-grown and programmed to satisfy the decadent whims of a Kyoto businessman.

    Marius says: "Al Gore nightmare meets Blade Runner."
    "It took a while to draw me in..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I wasn't sure what to expect when I began The Windup Girl, and it took a while to get into the story. The novel takes place in the future, at a point in time in which the planet has been ravaged by global warming, and bio-engineering and the resultant plagues and famines have made the world a hellish place. The world is torn between those who are simply trying to eke out some sort of existence, those who are pawns of the corporate world trying to squeeze money out of anything that will bleed, and those that are hungry for power. In the middle of all this are the various factions who believe in what they are doing, for better or worse, and of course, the windup girl.

    It's hard to like any of the characters in this book. As soon as one seemed to attempt to do something decent, their next move destroyed that idea. The Windup Girl is buffeted about by those around her, but towards the end does begin to determine her own fate.

    I don't want to give any more spoilers than I have, which I admit aren't much of a spoiler anyway. The story feels a lot like Margaret Atwood's MaddAddam Trilogy, but really they are world's apart other than the devastation left over from drastic bio-engineering and few characters to place your hopes upon.

    In spite of this lukewarm description I did enjoy the book. There was never going to be a happy ending, but perhaps one that was better than the present state. The story is told from the point of view of many of the characters, so there are few illusions to hold onto. But in spite of it all, there is a glimmer of hope at the end. At least that's what I'm telling myself.

    The narration was very well done, although the various accents seem to be misplaced at times.

    If you want a cheery happy ending in which all the flowers bloom, the skies clear, and the world is a happy place then this definitely isn't for you. But it's a story well told albeit from the point of view of the underbelly.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Ghost Road, The Regeneration Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Pat Barker
    • Narrated By Peter Firth
    Overall
    (77)
    Performance
    (41)
    Story
    (39)

    This novel challenges our assumptions about relationships between the classes, doctors and patients, men and women, and men and men. It completes the author's exploration of the First World War, and is a timeless depiction of humanity in extremis. Winner of the 1995 Booker Prize.

    Cariola says: "Most Accaimed . . .?"
    "A big disappointment"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I loved the first in this series. The second in the series left a lot to be desired. The third and final, having been raved about and won awards, was highly anticipated. Sadly a disappointment.

    The book feels like a number of random remembrances by the central characters. They join up now and then, but basically their lives and stories are independent. The story line, and the characters, seem to lack emotion and substance, ambling from one scene to the next.

    I'm following, but it's an apathetic journey.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Breakdown: A Love Story

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Katherine Amt Hanna
    • Narrated By Ralph Lister
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (36)
    Performance
    (32)
    Story
    (33)

    In a world ravaged by a deadly pandemic, former rock star Chris Price leaves New York and sets out on a long journey home to England. It’s been six years of devastation since the plague killed his wife and daughter, and Chris is determined to find out if any of his family has survived. His passage leaves him scarred, in body and mind, by exposure to humankind at its most desperate and dangerous. But the greatest ordeal awaits him beyond the urban ruins, in an idyllic country refuge where Chris meets a woman, Pauline, who is largely untouched by the world’s horrors.

    Patricia says: "Not what expected."
    "Rich and Memorable"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I'm a fan of post-apocalyptic novels, and have read a lot of them. I'm not a fan of what seems to be the current state of the genre, in which most of the story is spent detailing the worst of humanity, which seems to triumph and lay waste to what remains. Worlds in which only the selfish, greedy and vicious seem to survive.

    Breakdown tells the story of a man who has been scarred by his experience of loss and how he's endured what the world has thrown at him. Most of it things he'd rather forget. He's looking for his family, but takes a detour which offers him a chance to begin to heal.

    I loved it. The characters were rich, the world was believable, and the ever present human spirit and general goodness of most people seems to triumph. Maybe I'm unrealistic, but I tend to think this is a more accurate reflection of the world "after" than the gun-toting survivalists that spend their time decimating the population and laying waste. At least I hope so.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Martian

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By Andy Weir
    • Narrated By R. C. Bray
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (8677)
    Performance
    (8253)
    Story
    (8268)

    Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars. Now, he's sure he'll be the first person to die there. After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth that he’s alive—and even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone long before a rescue could arrive. Chances are, though, he won't have time to starve to death. The damaged machinery, unforgiving environment, or plain old "human error" are much more likely to kill him first. But Mark isn't ready to give up yet. Drawing on his ingenuity, his engineering skills—and a relentless, dogged refusal to quit—he steadfastly confronts one seemingly insurmountable obstacle after the next. Will his resourcefulness be enough to overcome the impossible odds against him?"

    Brian says: "Duct tape is magic and should be worshiped"
    "Great read"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The Martian is an unexpected delight. I love science fiction with real science. I'm not particularly scientific, but things have to make sense for me. The Martian fills the bill and has some really likeable characters, great pacing, and instead of evil people providing the challenges, space and the planet Mars have all the diabolical consequences anyone needs for plenty of suspense.

    The story begins when a Martian exploration team is caught in a serious dust storm and has to evacuate the planet. Unfortunately, one of the crew is battered by flying debris and, when his space suit shows no sign of life and his body is lost in the storm, the remaining crew has to leave the body behind to evacuate before they are all killed in the storm.

    When the lost crewman turns out to be alive, and learns he has been left behind, he decides to find a way to survive until the next exploration team arrives. Unfortunately the time to their arrival exceeds the amount of supplies he has, and there is no way for him to communicate with the departing ship or earth, to let them know he's alive. The Martian is his story, as well as the story of the other crew members and the team on earth, and how they try to bring him back home.

    Mark Watney, the stranded astronaut, is witty, inventive and would be a really fun guy to hang out with, which I did for almost 11 hours in the audiobook. Highly recommended for an enjoyable read with minimal whining and a lot of optimism. Plus a lot of invention from creating arable soil for the Thanksgiving potatoes to creating oxygen from hydrogen while not being incinerated.

    This book sits alongside one of my all time favorite books about the inventiveness and goodness of mankind, Neville Shute's "Trustee from the Toolroom". The Martian is a modern story with great characters, a lot of suspense, optimism and ingenuity making for an entertaining read.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Abandon

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 23 mins)
    • By Blake Crouch
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (230)
    Performance
    (188)
    Story
    (197)

    On Christmas Day in 1893, every man, woman and child in a remote mining town will disappear, belongings forsaken, meals left to freeze in vacant cabins, and not a single bone will be found - not even the gold that was rumored to have been the pride of this town. One hundred and thirteen years later, two backcountry guides are hired by a leading history professor and his journalist daughter to lead them into the abandoned mining town so they can learn what happened.

    Janet says: "Disturbing"
    "Really? I mean really? Spoilers."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book hit most of my hot/dislike buttons. Everything goes wrong for the protagonist, even if it's completely unlikely. People you think are dead reappear, when it's really implausible, the bad guys reappear like the terminator robots. The main characters make one stupid move after another. I could have taken both of those flaws and set them aside if it wasn't for the ending. Once again more bad guys come along and try to do in our heroine. And of course nothing turns out well.
    If this was a book written about a period 50 years ago I'd go along with it, but basic forensic evidence would have cleared the woman. There were enough bodies and bullets, along with a main character that was suffering from dehydration and exhaustion. Oh come on.
    I would have given it a one overall, but the reader did a good job in spite of the story.
    But I still hated it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Fault in Our Stars

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By John Green
    • Narrated By Kate Rudd
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (11988)
    Performance
    (10987)
    Story
    (11051)

    Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten. Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars is award-winning-author John Green’s most ambitious and heartbreaking work yet, brilliantly exploring the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love.

    FanB14 says: "Sad Premise, Fantastic Story"
    "Sweet, Sweet Sorrow"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I don't know why it is, but it often seems that the YA genre is able to express the poignancy of human experience and emotion in ways that adult fiction rarely seems to grasp. That is definitely true for "The Fault in Our Stars." It doesn't take much to make a story of teens with terminal cancer sad and miserable, but in John Green's book there is joy, happiness, love, friendship and more for the taking.

    In the story teens meet at a counseling session at a church that seems to be of much greater benefit to the parents sending them there than for the kids. But relationships form, and they all seem to know the score, and take their losses as well as their illnesses as a part of life.

    Adventures happen, relationships are formed, love happens and throughout there is honesty, sincerity and just plain humanity. I've got a few favorite quotes by the characters that are well worth remembering and sharing such as "We are all just barnacles on the container ship of consciousness." Much wisdom from the mouth of teens.

    Much to love, laugh and cry for in this story both well written and well read.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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