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Dubi

People say I resemble my dog (and vice-versa). He can hear sounds I can't hear, but I'm the one who listens to audiobooks.

New York, NY, United States

ratings
128
REVIEWS
127
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
6
HELPFUL VOTES
198

  • Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex-Drugs-Rock 'N' Roll Generation Saved Hollywood

    • UNABRIDGED (23 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Peter Biskind
    • Narrated By Dick Hill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (235)
    Performance
    (132)
    Story
    (134)

    Easy Rider, Raging Bulls follows the wild ride that was Hollywood in the 70s - an unabashed celebration of sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll (both on screen and off) and a climate where innovation and experimentation reigned supreme.

    Celia says: "If you studied film in the '70's..."
    "Great Dish, Sketchy Analysis"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about Easy Riders, Raging Bulls? What did you like least?

    This book is chock full of great inside baseball on the making of many of the great classic movies of the late 60s and 70s and juicy gossip about the directors, actors and other Hollywood figures who made them. That alone is worth the price of admission.

    On the other hand, the analysis from the point of view of film history left me feeling like something was missing -- the audience. So many of these now-classic films were made under protest or fraught with production problems or in some cases even total accidents, and by contrast, so many of the labors of love and pet projects and can't-miss efforts were failures, yet the analysis never looks at the vagaries of public tastes, opinions and reactions and the overriding determinant of what works and what doesn't.


    Would you recommend Easy Riders, Raging Bulls to your friends? Why or why not?

    I would recommend the book to friends because of all the salacious detail and the many forgotten facts (e.g. Raging Bull was critical and commercial flop when it was first released). But I would warn them that beyond that, the analysis was less than rigorous.


    Which character – as performed by Dick Hill – was your favorite?

    Not really relevant in a non-fiction work that touched on many, many different real-life characters and quoted scores of people. But Hill does a good job of narrating those many quotes.


    Was Easy Riders, Raging Bulls worth the listening time?

    Because the analysis was suspect, it can be argued that at 24 hours, it was overlong. It would have worked better as an inside look at the making of these movies without the analysis, in which case it would have probably come in at a more manageable 16-18 hours.


    Any additional comments?

    In addition to overlooking the impact of audiences and lionizing some questionable characters who often stumbled into their success, the history of 70s cinema as presented here is myopic. First of all, to draw a straight line from Bonnie and Clyde through Heaven's Gate is a mistake, because there is one line that goes up to Jaws and Star Wars and another than emerges from the impact of those two blockbusters (the book does not overlook that impact, but it doesn't treat it as the watershed it truly was).

    But more than that, there is no more than token mention of the groundbreaking Hollywood filmmaking of the post-war era that set the stage for the "New Hollywood" and the independent cinema that emerged from the ashes of Heaven's Gate. Kudos to the author for giving so much attention to the often forgotten Hal Ashby, but others that emerged from the live TV dramas of the 50s are barely mentioned (e.g. Lumet) or not mentioned at all (most egregiously, George Roy Hill), even though they were responsible for some of the seminal films of the era.

    Likewise, the ruination of Hollywood that we are left with at the conclusion makes no mention of the fact that The Return of the Secaucus Seven had already launched indie film, to be followed by the likes of Jarmusch, the Coens, Spike Lee, Soderbergh, et.al. in the 80s, that Hollywood still had some tricks up its sleeve (John Hughes, Barry Levinson, Rob Reiner, Ridley Scott, Oliver Stone, James Cameron -- how many people remember that The Terminator was an independent film that was a total sleeper when it first came out?), that Miramax was already founded before the end of the 80s, that the midnight movie phenomenon had already launched auteurs like David Lynch and John Waters, and that there were still a lot of good imports coming from other countries (despite this book's assertion that foreign film became irrelevant once Hollywood films were allowed to show nudity and sex).

    And newsflash for the author: Woody Allen has directed 45 movies since the only one that is mentioned in this book (What's New Pussycat, which he didn't even direct), many of the most important of those during the New Hollywood era and immediately thereafter.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • WWW: Wake

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Robert J. Sawyer
    • Narrated By Jessica Almasy, Jennifer Van Dyck, A. C. Fellner, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1730)
    Performance
    (984)
    Story
    (988)

    Caitlin Decter is young, pretty, feisty, a genius at math - and blind. Still, she can surf the net with the best of them, following its complex paths clearly in her mind. But Caitlin's brain long ago co-opted her primary visual cortex to help her navigate online. So when she receives an implant to restore her sight, instead of seeing reality, the landscape of the World Wide Web explodes into her consciousness, spreading out all around her in a riot of colors and shapes.

    'Nathan says: "Fantastic."
    "Somnolent Awakenings"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A blind teemager has her vision restored, a monkey learns to paint portraits, the Chinese president does some nefarious megalomaniacal Chinese president stuff, and the internet comes to life in time to send the formerly blind girl birthday wishes in Robert Sawyer's Wake, the first installment in his WWW trilogy.

    What Sawyer does best here, as he does in his other books, is to choose a theme (or two), research it pretty well, and present a technically satisfying fictional portrait of that theme (or two). In WWW, the main theme is consciousness -- how it may have developed in humans during earlier stages of evolution, how it could morph within an intelligent modern day human when her primary senses are altered, how it might develop in non-human entities such as lower primates and (artificially) in machines.

    Where Sawyer stumbles is in plot and character development. The operative weaknesses are a) it all unfolds too slowly, no doubt a function of originally being published in serialized form, as well as being stretched out into a trilogy, and b) it is all too familiar, too stock, despite taking so much extra time to work it all out. The confluence of those two factors is that there is too much time spent explaining the technicalities behind the plot and themes (although, as I said previously, those technicalities become the saving grace).

    I realize that seems contradictory -- what I like best about the book is, so I claim, fluff that detracts from plot and character development. To get five stars and a rave review from me, Sawyer would have had to come up with a better story and more complex characters while retaining the great background material. Perhaps that happens later in the trilogy. I'm not sure yet whether I will take the time to find that out for myself.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Clockwork

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 31 mins)
    • By Philip Pullman
    • Narrated By Anton Lesser
    Overall
    (519)
    Performance
    (457)
    Story
    (460)

    A tormented apprentice clock-maker - and a deadly knight in armour. A mechanical prince - and the sinister Dr Kalmenius, who some say is the devil... Wind up these characters, fit them into a story on a cold winter's evening and suddenly life and the story begin to merge - almost like clockwork...

    David says: "A modern clockwork fairy tale"
    "Fractured Fairy Tale"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Like many readers, I only ever read Philip Pullman's Dark Materials series, starting with The Golden Compass. Clockwork provided an opportunity to sample another of his works, also a children's book, like most of his books. Now, I'm not sure if I want to try that again -- this just did not work for me.

    I never think it's a good idea for a writer to explain his central metaphor, even to children who may otherwise not understand it. But to explain how clocks worked in a pre-electronic age, then tell us that stories can work the same way, then having one character write a story within the story called Clockwork, having another character make clockworks, and having a third who has clockwork instead of a heart, well, it's all just too much, and doesn't make all that much sense. I'm not sure how children can be expected to understand this when it is too convoluted for this adult, even with all the preamble about clockwork and metaphor.

    The print edition is heavily illustrated, but I don't think the absence of illustration makes any difference. I could see how it might enhance the printed word, but the spoken word should hold water on its own. I don't see how pictures would make this tale any less nonsensical.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Mayor of MacDougal Street: A Memoir

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Dave Van Ronk, Elijah Wald
    • Narrated By Sean Runnette
    Overall
    (45)
    Performance
    (44)
    Story
    (45)

    Dave Van Ronk was one of the founding figures of the 1960s folk revival, but he was far more than that. A pioneer of modern acoustic blues, a fine songwriter and arranger, a powerful singer, and one of the most influential guitarists of the ’60s, he was also a marvelous storyteller, a peerless musical historian, and one of the most quotable figures on the Village scene. The Mayor of MacDougal Street is a firsthand account by a major player in the social and musical history of the ’50s and ’60s.

    MidwestGeek says: "Overview of NYC folk music scene of '50's & 60's."
    "Inside Dave Van Ronk"
    Overall
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    Dave Van Ronk told co-author Elijah Wald that he did not want to write an autobiography. He wanted to capture the spirit of Greenwich Village during the 60s folk revival (the "folk scare" as he fondly dubbed it). He wanted to capture it as he saw it, having been a central figure for its duration, longer than anyone else, from its earliest sparks to his untimely death many decades later in 2002. To his credit, Van Ronk succeeded in his express intention and wrote a compelling musical and personal memoir in the process.

    Van Ronk always seemed miss out on everything. He was too late for the trad jazz revival, his first musical love. He was too early to find fame and fortune in the folk revival that took off in the wake of Peter, Paul and Mary (he turned down an offer to complete the trio, which then went to Paul Stookey) and Bob Dylan, who recorded Dave's version of House of the Rising Sun before Dave had a chance to do so himself. And by his own preference, he stayed clear of rock'n'roll and the singer-songwriter wave started by contemporaries like Dylan, Phil Ochs and Tom Paxton.

    But Van Ronk was not only there when a seminal music scene developed and blossomed, he was a pivotal figure in its development, even if he never became a star himself. These days, Dave's birthplace, Brooklyn, is home to a nascent folk scene (that Dave himself would not categorize as folk but as singer-songwriter), so there is renewed interest in the Village folk revival of the late 50s and 60s. Dave's own memoir of that era covers every aspect of that scene in an entertaining and opinionated first person narrative, the highlights of which are his chapters on Reverend Gary Davis, Dylan, and the complicated taxonomy of Village social, political and musical movements of the era.

    I admit that I cannot be an objective reviewer. Not that I was a big Van Ronk fan in the day -- I did see him (and enjoy him) at the Bitter End in the 80s and I did have one or two of his records (though I didn't listen to them often, not at all in the past 25 years). But he is not one of my major influences. We play the same style, share many of the same influences (Rev. Davis, Jelly Roll Morton), and I too was a busker in Washington Square (albeit twenty years later, being that much younger than him). But I too have lived my entire adult life in and around the Village and have always aspired toward the same musical ends, so to me, this book is manna from heaven.

    Still, I think anyone with an interest in the music and the era will enjoy it as well. Certainly more so than the recent movie Inside Llewyn Davis, based on this book but taking so many liberties with the character of Van Ronk and the Village music scene that figures from that era, including Van Ronk's first wife, have taken issue with it. But the music is spot on, which is probably the most important thing (although the primary song used in the movie, Hang Me, is never once mentioned in the book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Syrup

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Maxx Barry
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (136)
    Performance
    (74)
    Story
    (74)

    When Scat comes up with an idea for the hottest new soda ever, he's sure he'll retire as the next savvy marketing success story. But in the treacherous waters of corporate America, there are no sure things. Suddenly Scat finds himself scrambling to save not only his idea, but his yet-to-be-realized career. With the help of a scarily beautiful and brainy girl called 6, he sets out on a mission to reclaim the fame and fortune that, time and again, elude him.

    Kris says: "Perfect Satire"
    "Things Don't Necessarily Go Better At Coke"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is the third book by Max Barry that I've read (the prior two in print), and as a former participant in the corporate work force as both employee and executive, I have enjoyed his biting satires of that world. Jennifer Government imagines a world in which corporations operate with minimal governmental regulation and go so far as killing people as part of their marketing campaigns. Company imagines a corporation in which employees don't actually know what their company produces, and what happens when one of them tries to find out.

    Syrup, Barry's first novel, examines marketing techniques and internal corporate politics set inside the Coco-Cola Company. Like its successors, it starts with a smart but naive young man just trying to do his job and get ahead, a strong and sexy woman who has the power to make his personal and professional dreams come true, a cold-blooded nemesis who lies and cheats his way to the top, and a spectrum of corporate drones, mindless media types, inept executives, and hip outsiders.

    All three books had the same effect on me: I loved their initial premise, liked the characters, bought into the parody for the most part, but ultimately felt that the satire, following a vicious course of logic, strayed a little too far into surrealism. They are all good in the end, all good overall, but there is something unsettling about a strict devotion to the internal logic of the premise taking the story to illogical conclusions. In Syrup, the primary result is repetition in the final act, which costs Barry one star in my estimation.

    I got this audiobook when I saw Barry's name, based on past experience with him, and never even looked at the narrator. I wasn't more than three minutes in when I felt the need to increase the playback speed to 1.25, and as soon as I did so, I thought -- this must be Scott Brick. Sure enough. I didn't recognize him at first because this is not as plodding as his normal pace of narration, but it still needed that little bit of speed to pick things up.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Spell or High Water: Magic 2.0

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Scott Meyer
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2226)
    Performance
    (2047)
    Story
    (2049)

    A month has passed since Martin helped to defeat the evil programmer Jimmy, and things couldn't be going better. Except for his love life, that is. Feeling distant and lost, Gwen has journeyed to Atlantis, a tolerant and benevolent kingdom governed by the Sorceresses, and a place known to be a safe haven to all female time-travelers.

    Charles says: "Fantastic: 2.0"
    "A Higher Water Mark for Meyer"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Scott Meyer's Magic 2.0 series builds on an interesting premise: present-day computer geeks, using their programming power to travel through time and create other advantages for themselves, appear to be wizards to the people in the past. In Off to Be the Wizard (OTBTW), the first entry in the series, that location was medieval England. In the follow-up, Spell or High Water (SOHW), the primary locale is Atlantis.

    For me, SOHW is one star better than OTBTW in every respect. In my review of the first book, I started by noting that it was as fun and funny as I had hoped, but that it was flawed, and I concluded by noting that I hoped Meyer could improve on those flaws in the sequel that obviously on the way. And indeed he has, addressing exactly the two main problems I had, making this a better book and a better listen (narrator Luke Daniels also improves on my problem with his reading of OTBTW, toning down the voices a little, though not enough).

    The main thing on the author's end is that is primarily a time travel story, but one in which nothing anyone does in the past changes the future. While it remains true in SOHW that present day outcomes cannot be altered, SOHW allows for a) a possible explanation somewhere down the road of why that is, and more importantly b) possible changes in the timeline of the past they now inhabit, which influences their actions.

    In addition, we are no longer confined to medieval England as our setting. We now also have Atlantis, even though it is a mythical setting rather than an historical one. We also have "wizards" and "sorceresses" in Atlantis for a summit who have come from many times and places in the past and present, and while I still yearned for more of that kind of variety, it was an improvement to have even a little of it.

    Now, if Meyer can also work in more variation in the present day places the so-called wizards come from, in addition to more locales in the past (mythical or real), that would be even better. And we don't have to wait to find out -- the third volume in the series, and Unwelcome Quest, just came out.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Plagiarist: A Novella

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 29 mins)
    • By Hugh Howey
    • Narrated By Alexander J. Masters
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (306)
    Performance
    (265)
    Story
    (264)

    Adam Griffey is living two lives. By day, he teaches literature. At night, he steals it. Adam is a plagiarist, an expert reader with an eye for great works. He prowls simulated worlds perusing virtual texts, looking for the next big thing. And when he finds it, he memorizes it page by page, line by line, word for word. And then he brings it back to his world, the real world, and he sells it. But what happens when these virtual worlds begin to seem more real than his own? What happens when the people within them mean more to him than flesh and blood?

    Katherine says: "PKD could have written this story"
    "The Wages of Sim"
    Overall
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    Story

    In Hugh Howey's novella, some people go into the many worlds available via simulators to conduct scientific research, some to have some fun, some, as in the case of the main title character, to find works of literary art, memorize them, and publish them in the real world as their own. The nature of creativity is but one of several themes explored in this very short work, along with happiness in the world of fantasy vs. reality.

    I prefer longer audiobooks to short ones. Nevertheless, I've listened to a number of short works recently. To be honest, that's because they are less expensive. I don't understand why the 17-hour, 242 MB Wool Omnibus is four times as costly as the 90-minute, 42MB Plagiarist -- yes, that's more storage, and a costlier audio production, but these are not variable costs. But that's the way audiobooks are priced, based on value no doubt.

    I've come to a simple conclusion: A good novella makes you wish it was a full length novel, makes you long for more. A lesser work of lesser length makes you see why it could not have been longer -- there's just not enough there to begin with. The Plagiarist, for me, falls squarely in the former category -- it's a neat little novella, with a nice twist at the end (fairly predictable), but I would have loved to learn more about these worlds, real and simulated, and the characters that inhabit them.

    I did have a bit a problem with the narration. Too slow, too ponderous, a bit depressing. I sped up the playback to 1.25, which helped, but made it even shorter. Is it possible that this is the first entry in what will eventually be a full length omnibus, as Howey has created in the past? I hope so -- if so, I hope a new narrator is utilized.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The President's Pilot

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Robert Gandt
    • Narrated By Thomas Block
    Overall
    (524)
    Performance
    (476)
    Story
    (467)

    A year and a half into her first term as President of the United States, Libby Paulsen is in a world of trouble. Her controversial agenda has placed her in a doomsday clash with a right wing cabal led by an enigmatic Air Force general. The conspirators will stop at nothing - including assassination - to remove Libby Paulsen from office. When the cabal targets Air Force One, Libby's Presidency - and her life - rest in the hands of a maverick pilot named Pete Brand, a man with whom the President shares a long-smoldering secret.

    Matthew says: "Gives a whole new meaning to Snakes on a Plane!"
    "What Happens When You Hire Friends"
    Overall
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    No one understands why President Libby Paulsen hired Pete Brand to pilot Air Force One, circumventing normal chains of seniority. They don't know that she once had a longstanding personal relationship with him. But when a right wing conspiracy launches a military coup to overthrow her administration, assassinating her VP and trying to knock AF1 from the sky, Brand steps in to attempt to save the day, even as things regress from bad to worse to ludicrous.

    Robert Gandt, a former air force and airline pilot turned writer, has crafted a decent political thriller around this concept, a straight-ahead, action-packed, made-for-TV page turner. His characters may be straight from central casting and his plot may require a huge suspension of disbelief -- the conventional wisdom against conspiracy theories is that people can't keep secrets, and there are a lot of conspirators here, a LOT, all of them willing to kill at the drop of a hat. Still, it comes together quickly and stays together despite its loose fabric.

    But as an audiobook, it suffers from one fatal flaw. President Paulsen may have benefited in the end by hiring her friend as pilot. But Gandt does not benefit from hiring his friend and fellow aviation author Tom Block as narrator. To describe his reading as amateurish would be an insult to amateurs. To describe his voice as growly would be an insult to growlers. To describe his character voicings as ... well, those are just an insult to our ears.

    I would have at least wanted to give this book 3 1/2 stars -- four overall and three for story because of how far it stretches credulity -- but I have to round down to three because of this horrific performance. I want to read more of Gandt's fiction, but all of his audio novels are narrated by Block, so I would have to turn to his print editions.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Human Division

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By John Scalzi
    • Narrated By William Dufris
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1142)
    Performance
    (1022)
    Story
    (1034)

    The people of Earth now know that the human Colonial Union has kept them ignorant of the dangerous universe around them. For generations the CU had defended humanity against hostile aliens, deliberately keeping Earth an ignorant backwater and a source of military recruits. Now the CU’s secrets are known to all. Other alien races have come on the scene and formed a new alliance - an alliance against the Colonial Union. And they’ve invited the people of Earth to join them. For a shaken and betrayed Earth, the choice isn't obvious or easy.

    linda says: "A Middling Position"
    "Structured Like a TV Series"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I haven't read Old Man's War, so I'm approaching The Human Division as a new series, a spin-off set in the OMW universe. In fact, the way the book was written -- chapters called episodes published weekly -- this omnibus volume has the feel of a TV series. For me, this is a good thing.

    But it's more than just the publication schedule (13 episodes, the standard for a cable drama). The way the episodes and the overall story are plotted are key to the feel of a TV series. The episodes stand up on their own, for the most part, as complete stories, and they also figure into the overall story arc -- attempts by various forces to either divide the human race scattered across the galaxy from Earth or keep them united.

    Every other episode centers on the main characters -- Colonial Union officer Harry Wilson, diplomatic aide Hart Schmidt, and ambassador Ode Obumwe (there are several other major recurring characters). In between, the stories follow other characters, some of whom figure more or less as the overall story unfolds. The emphasis on characterization over plotting is highly successful, as it would be on the best TV series.

    The book ends with a cliffhanger that leaves the central mystery unresolved, anticipating the next entry in the series, due out this year (2015) -- indeed, in announcing the next entry, John Scalzi said "The Human Division has been renewed for a second season".

    Having previously listened to all of Scalzi's novels except any of the OMW series, I was worried about having a narrator other than Wil Wheaton, who is my favorite. But William Dufris, who reads most of the OMW series, is excellent as well. Maybe not as funny as WW, but maybe this series is not supposed to be as funny (though Harry Wilson is a bit of sarcastic Scalzi cut-up, and Dufris does him justice).

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • What Einstein Told His Cook: Kitchen Science Explained

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By Robert L. Wolke
    • Narrated By Sean Runnette
    Overall
    (1088)
    Performance
    (918)
    Story
    (912)

    Why is red meat red? How do they decaffeinate coffee? Do you wish you understood the science of food but don't want to plow through dry, technical books? In What Einstein Told His Cook, University of Pittsburgh chemistry professor emeritus and award-winning Washington Post food columnist Robert L. Wolke provides reliable and witty explanations for your most burning food questions, while debunking misconceptions and helping you interpret confusing advertising and labeling.

    Teddy says: "Everything you want to know about Kitchen Science"
    "This Book Will Save You Money!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Award winning chemistry professor Robert Wolke answers myriad questions on the subject of food and food preparation, all from the point of view of the science of where food comes from, how to best store it, how to cook it, etc. etc. His explanations are so good, they will more than pay back the price of buying this audiobook. For example, you will never again spend more for sea salt or a salt grinder than you will for a box of regular table salt, and you will understand why from a simple scientific point of view.

    As you might expect from a non-fiction book that doesn't have a defined narrative flow (each section stands on its own), the best comes first. The opening sections on sugar, salt, and fat -- basic ingredients with significant health factors -- are outstanding. The middle sections on proteins, chemicals, and drinks are still excellent, but a bit scattershot in terms of relevance (do I really care if light cream is technically heavier than heavy cream or whether an egg can really fry on a hot sidewalk?).

    The penultimate chapter on microwaves is essential and will change the way you use yours -- understanding how microwaves defrost frozen food vs. the alternatives will, once again, save you lots of money, or at least improve your culinary results. But the closing section seriously starts to sag, which is a shame since it focuses on kitchen tools -- still, it could save you serious bucks when it comes to buying tools since you will be that much more knowledgeable about what they do and what they can't do for you.

    The lively narration helps. I look forward to reading the follow-up, although I worry that, like the last chapter of this volume, there will be a natural downtrend in interest level. My only other caveat is that, unlike another science book I recently listened to (Neil DeGrasse Tyson's Great Courses lectures on physics), it does seriously help to have a foundational understanding of some scientific principles in order to understand this book -- nothing more than high school level, though, which is the highest level of science I ever studied.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Overdraft: The Orion Offensive

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By John Jackson Miller
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (125)
    Performance
    (108)
    Story
    (112)

    In the twenty-second century, humanity has journeyed to the stars, and found them open for business. And when it comes to protecting that business, Chief Bridget Yang and Surge Team Sigma - her squad of heavily armed space marines - are up to the task. Unfortunately, Jamie Sturm is one problem they can’t just vaporize. When Jamie’s financial schemes bankrupt their expedition, Bridget and her crew refuse to let the rogue stock trader walk away.

    Brian says: "Fairly well done"
    "Over It Before It's Over"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I rarely give up on a book, neither in print nor in audio. I tried to stick with this one, intending to plow through, resisting the urge to pull the plug at the one-hour mark, at two hours, three, and various other points along the way. Finally, at four, I just couldn't stand it any more. I kept hearing the voice of Michael Bunker in his afterword to Legendarium advising readers to sample as many independently published books as possible, but if one doesn't work, put it down and start another. So that's what I am going to do.

    I got Overdraft as an Audible sale book because of its interesting premise and good reviews -- a stock trader of the type we'd encounter today is drawn into a 22nd century space opera, in a galaxy that capitalist humans are pleased to discover "is open for business". It was also supposed to be fun and funny, my favorite description for any type of audiobook, especially science fiction.

    But Overdraft does not deliver on its premise nor its promise. It is just a bunch of people constantly yelling at each other while battling predictably bizarre aliens. Especially annoying is the stockbroker, voiced as a nerd. I don't blame Luke Daniels for the over-the-top voices -- he is usually good at performing different characters. The material is the primary problem, and one would also have to hold the director accountable for the misguided performance.

    I usually go back and try again when I give up on a book, but I don't foresee doing that this time, not unless I totally run out of audiobooks, and that is not happening any time soon.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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