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Doug D. Eigsti

Increasing my ops tempo by allowing storytellers to whisper in my ear(buds).

Colorado Springs, Colorado United States | Member Since 2011

100
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 114 reviews
  • 124 ratings
  • 554 titles in library
  • 112 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
25
FOLLOWERS
4

  • The Night Land: A Love Tale

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By William Hope Hodgson
    • Narrated By Drew Ariana
    Overall
    (11)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    In the far future, an unnamed narrator, who along with what remains of the human race dwells uneasily in an underground fortress-city surrounded by brooding, chaotic, relentless Watching Things, Silent Ones, Hounds, Giants, "Ab-humans," Brutes, and enormous slugs and spiders, follows a telepathic distress signal into the unfathomable darkness. The Earth's surface is frozen....

    Christopher says: "Tough read, but rewarding"
    "Monstrous Meandering Unfathomable Obscurity"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I have never come across a book of this sort. It is essentially a meandering account of one man’s quest to recover a lost love set in an incomprehensible future where the sun has been extinguished. Told in a sing-song prose and using language evocative of Shakespeare it sounds like an epic poem. Personally I did not find this to be a successful attempt at relating a quasi-Science Fiction tale is the format of an Elizabethan love poem. The repetition of many terms takes on the quality of poetic meter at times but to me revealed the lack of imagination of the author in selecting more descriptive words.

    The narrator, Drew Ariana, is well suited to this material. He has a quaint accent that is not quite English in character but resonates with the echoes of a past era and is the sole reason that I persevered until the end. In whole, this is a bizarre listening experience that I can find none else with which to compare.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy: The Primary Phase (Dramatised)

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Douglas Adams
    • Narrated By Peter Jones, Simon Jones, Geoffrey McGivern, and others
    Overall
    (1401)
    Performance
    (1108)
    Story
    (1112)

    A Special Edition of the original radio series The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1978 and recently voted the Nation's Favourite Audiobook in a Guardian poll. Starring Peter Jones, Simon Jones, Geoffrey McGivern, Mark Wing-Davey, Susan Sheridan and Stephen Moore, these six episodes (Fit the First to Fit the Sixth) have been remastered to modern-day standards by Dirk Maggs, and for the first time feature Philip Pope's arrangement of the familiar theme tune.

    Thomas says: "Difficult to listen to in the car!"
    "…..Welcome to the Loonie Bin….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The books I read years ago and wanted to revisit the series. Unbeknownst to me as it turns out, the Hitchhiker’s Guide first appeared in the form of a radio play and so this does not sound like an adaptation. It is clear that this is the original version. It is fresh and brand new.

    My one criticism is not with the material but with the sound effects. I found the various echoes and reverbs to be an obstruction to understanding the material. At times, the listener has to put up with sound effects that are as loud as the dialog. This becomes more of a deterrent to understanding, not an enhancement.

    The full cast performance is wonderful and strikes precisely the right tone for the material.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Timebound

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By Rysa Walker
    • Narrated By Kate Rudd
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (743)
    Performance
    (681)
    Story
    (682)

    When Kate Pierce-Keller’s grandmother gives her a strange blue medallion and speaks of time travel, sixteen-year-old Kate assumes the old woman is delusional. But it all becomes horrifyingly real when a murder in the past destroys the foundation of Kate’s present-day life. Suddenly, that medallion is the only thing protecting Kate from blinking out of existence. Kate learns that the 1893 killing is part of something much more sinister, and her genetic ability to time travel makes Kate the only one who can fix the future.

    Lessa says: "Completely Enjoyed It"
    "This is true love. Think this happens every day?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was hoping this novel would be a good one for my young daughters but I enjoyed it myself. I am a sucker for Time-Travel so this book did have a hook in me from the start. The TT in this book is marginally of the Science-Fiction classification, having a basis in technology. But really this is a teenage romance novel. I was glad to find that the intimacy is strictly PG-13. This novel’s strong suit is that it is tightly plotted with a good sense of story. The main characters are quite likable and not overly precocious as is typical with most Young Adult fiction. True, they do try to save the world but then this is standard fare for any novel of most any genre. This is a fine book and not just for children.

    Kate Rudd has a nice voice with plenty of passion and great variety of pacing that is just right for this story. She has great range in female character voicings and relates a lot of emotion. My only criticism is in her rendition of the male voices who—to my very male ear—sounds like the vocal cords of rather gruff women and not men. As a result, this seems like an all-female cast production.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Brothers in Battle, Best of Friends

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By William 'Wild Bill' Guarnere, Edward 'Babe' Heffron, Robyn Post
    • Narrated By Dick Hill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (309)
    Performance
    (217)
    Story
    (218)

    William "Wild Bill" Guarnere and Edward "Babe" Heffron were among the first paratroopers of the U.S. Army - members of an elite unit of the 101st Airborne Division called Easy Company. Arguably the bravest, most efficient, physically fit, and tight-knit group of soldiers the Army has ever produced, the unit was called upon for every high-risk operation of the war, including D-Day, Operation Market Garden in Holland, the Battle of the Bulge, and the capture of Hitler's Eagle's Nest in Berchtesgaden.

    danny lawrence says: "An instant favorite"
    ".....an Appointment with Destiny....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    We have no history but we have an appointment with destiny

    This is a very engaging dual first-person account of the exploits of Easy Company. Narrator Dick Hill portrays the two paratroopers with Philadelphia accents perfectly and the text is written in a conversational style that lends it an air of authenticity. These two guys pull no punches in relating their saga. On the field of battle they were cold-blooded killers out for revenge and on leave they were hot-blooded party boys chasing women. Apparently the girls in war time will go for any soldier with a paycheck. I wonder what their wives think of their fondly remembered war time tales of fornication and debauchery?

    For those whom WWII has a particular fascination this is a refreshingly honest memoir. The veil of secrecy is lifted and all the full war experience is related. I usually gravitate toward grand sweeping histories of the war, telling the wide world-wide impact. This helped me—more than any other historical record—gain a better understanding of what the war was like for the soldiers on the ground, and why they are so reluctant to talk about it.

    Dick Hill is fantastic. His South Philly accent is spot on he is so precise that it is easy to distinguish between Wild Bill and Babe even though they are from the same neighborhood and use the same lingo. I really appreciated the way Hill introduced emotion into his performance. It is as if Wild Bill and Babe are doing the reading themselves.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 23 mins)
    • By Alfred Lansing
    • Narrated By Simon Prebble
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2335)
    Performance
    (1654)
    Story
    (1663)

    In August of 1914, the British ship Endurance set sail for the South Atlantic. In October, 1915, still half a continent away from its intended base, the ship was trapped, then crushed in the ice. For five months, Sir Ernest Shackleton and his men, drifting on ice packs, were castaways in one of the most savage regions of the world.

    Theresa says: "Amazing story, well written & well read"
    "…..Grace Under Pressure….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Here we have an example of life imitating art. Having recently finished listening to Jules Verne’s MYSTERIOUS ISLAND, and finding it to be exciting but unrealistically optimistic and gung-ho, I found that this book proved to be so similar as to be remarkable. The difference is that ENDURANCE is a factual account, and one written years after Verne’s fictional story. Both tales feature noble adventurous men lead by audacious swashbuckling visionaries. I recommend listening to these two books together for the comparison value.

    Simon Prebble performs an excellent rendition of men pushed to the limits of human ability.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Higher Call: An Incredible True Story of Combat and Chivalry in the War-Torn Skies of World War II

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Adam Makos
    • Narrated By Robertson Dean
    Overall
    (1010)
    Performance
    (923)
    Story
    (933)

    Four days before Christmas in 1943, a badly damaged American bomber struggled to fly over wartime Germany. At its controls was a 21-year-old pilot. Half his crew lay wounded or dead. It was their first mission. Suddenly a sleek, dark shape pulled up on the bomber’s tail - a German Messerschmitt fighter. Worse, the German pilot was an ace, a man able to destroy the American bomber with the squeeze of a trigger.

    JerryL says: "An Absolutely Incredcredible Audiobook!"
    "…..The Eagles Know Where the Good Air is….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I have rarely encountered a book with sections so disparate in quality. At first the book is dispassionate; a mere assemblage of biographical anecdotes with all the insight and passion of a High School research paper. Then something happens. The people to whom we have been introduced—and who seem like so many stick figures for all the humanity that had been associated with their early exploits—come vibrantly to life. When the air war heats up for these pilots, the writers suddenly gain empathy for them and the scenes in the air take of the feeling of grand drama. The book continues in this fashion, flip-flopping between lackluster factual accounts and gripping high drama; sometimes it is brilliant and engaging then it degenerates into a description of the sad state of Germany under the Nazi regime. Later it again will become immediate, personal and exciting, and even rises into moments of insight and poignancy. One constant theme of the book is the sense of honor that inhabits the pilots on both sides of the conflict embodied in the statement, “A man must only answer to God and our comrades.”

    Robertson Dean is wonderful in this non-fiction account. When the account requires drama Dean pulls out his repertoire of character voices and can hold the tension during the battle scenes masterfully.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Old Man's War

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By John Scalzi
    • Narrated By William Dufris
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3918)
    Performance
    (2871)
    Story
    (2894)

    John Perry did two things on his 75th birthday. First, he visited his wife's grave. Then he joined the army. The good news is that humanity finally made it into interstellar space. The bad news is that planets fit to live on are scarce - and alien races willing to fight us for them are common. So, we fight, to defend Earth and to stake our own claim to planetary real estate. Far from Earth, the war has been going on for decades: brutal, bloody, unyielding.

    Michael says: "As good as Heinlein"
    "…..You don’t have the math for it….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The early sections of this novel are of one nature and that latter parts are of another. It begins with a character study of some aged people choosing to sign up for military service and going through basic training. These sections are interesting and often humorous, typical of a John Scalzi book; but then the book transitions into rather standard combat Science Fiction fare; taking us through a series of alien bug hunts. By this time some of the fundamental conceits of the book begin to wear on you. I began to think of the unrealistic suppositions such as the idea that the technologically advanced human colonists do not share their advanced, and life-extending, technologies with their ancestors back on earth. Also, since no one on earth knows anything about the colonies how can one of the characters—who admittedly does not have the math for it—understand the theory of Skip Drive? I have listened to three other Scalzi books and liked this one the least. His trademark humor seemed muted here. He is better when he doesn’t take himself too seriously. So, at about the time that my willing suspension of disbelief was wearing thin, the plot twists yet again in a dues ex machine fashion and the sense of wonder returns as an element of time-travel is introduced. This saved the book from an early abandonment for me and made me consider continuing with the sequels.

    William Dufris is very good, as always. He delivers a competent rendering of the various characters in the book. The problem is that when the characters become pedantic and overbearing he faithfully tracks along with them. He is very good at trying to impart emotion into the character voices he does. I like it when the narrator goes over the top in his performance; this is an all too infrequent occurrence in the realm of audiobooks. This is a shame, because it is one of the elements that help to distinguish it as an art form separate and distinct from the literature upon with it depends.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Redshirts: A Novel with Three Codas

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By John Scalzi
    • Narrated By Wil Wheaton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (5800)
    Performance
    (5405)
    Story
    (5403)

    Ensign Andrew Dahl has just been assigned to the Universal Union Capital Ship Intrepid, flagship of the Universal Union since the year 2456. Life couldn’t be better…until Andrew begins to pick up on the facts that (1) every Away Mission involves some kind of lethal confrontation with alien forces; (2) the ship’s captain, its chief science officer, and the handsome Lieutenant Kerensky always survive these confrontations; and (3) at least one low-ranked crew member is, sadly, always killed.

    Paige says: "Not his Wheal-house"
    "…..The Narrative Exists….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Being a Treker from way back I found many great inside jokes to be appreciated in this book. It is clear that Scalzi is a SF fan. This is a book that many of us fans have always wanted to have; to find someone else who loves the genre as much as we do and can write a pastiche containing many tributes to Star Trek, and to do it with humor. I like the show enough that I even smile when Scalzi points out the flaws in the show.

    I found the connections between the Intrepid and the Enterprise to be a useful plot device. And the method that Scalzi uses to make the characters aware of their situation and especially the convoluted manner in which they extract themselves to be quite ingenious. This is a light-hearted book that tries to satisfy the fans and even introduces some serious themes. It is a good time.

    The codas elevate a witty pastiche into an introspective piece of speculative fiction that is concerned with the effects of events that would be labeled throw-away in a typical novel. I like novels that make me think, even think about things that are impossible. This is interesting for that reason.

    The choice to make Wil Wheaton the narrator of this Star Trek spoof is just another layer of complexity to the punch line. Wheaton clearly is well-versed in Trek and has just the right inflection to pull off all the tongue-in-cheek jokes and yet still remain serious because he knows that there are guys out there like me that eat this stuff up.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Heft

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Liz Moore
    • Narrated By Kirby Heyborne, Keith Szarabajka
    Overall
    (1536)
    Performance
    (1388)
    Story
    (1391)

    Forrmer academic Arthur Opp weighs 550 pounds and hasn’t left his rambling Brooklyn home in a decade. Twenty miles away in Yonkers, seventeen-year-old Kel Keller navigates life as the poor kid in a rich school and pins his hopes on what seems like a promising baseball career - if he can untangle himself from his family drama.

    Deborah says: "Mesmerizing Performance"
    "…..Unhappy in its Own Way….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This novel is real. Life is hard and this book is hard and discouraging—and real. If you just finished watching Schindler’s List and still feel a little too buoyant, then give this book a try. It will surely succeed in reacquainting you will life’s harsh reality.

    This book follows two very different characters. Both are portrayed realistically. I found the depiction of Arthur Opp to be insightfully tragic and well fleshed-out. I feel now as if I have a better understanding of the plight of the morbidly obese: what it must be like to be so corpulent that going out in public is a burden too massive to bear. Arthur Opp is a sympathetic character; a man who has given into his one besetting sin. Not so far from any one of us if we were to cease resisting the temptation to do the same. He is not beyond redemption, but it has taken him many years to get into his present state, and no quick remedy is possible. This was a human being and this was a man with a story.

    Kel Keller the high-school Baseball phenom seems to be everything that is wrong with the younger generation: Secret home life with an alcoholic mother. Popular athlete who is encouraged to be the hero by day and subverted by his very popularity into becoming the promiscuous party boy by night—you know, normal high school life. Kel is so out of touch with the reality of his own situation that he can’t bring himself to tell the girl he loves his true feelings but then has casual sex with another girl he hardly knows—and thinks nothing of it! His only regret is that his real love finds out: something that any right thinking person would surely expect, but that never even crosses his mind. His story is a spiral out of control that is, if anything, more sad than Arthur Opp eating his way into oblivion. I found it a very alienating experience getting inside the head of such a youth so intent on being misspent. I hated the scenes with Kel Keller, dreaded them when they appeared, not because they were trite or cliché, but because they seemed so true that it caused me to lose any hope for this present generation. If they are like Kel Keller, then we are doomed.


    The narration, by two different performers, is first-rate. It is fitting that the two main characters should have separate narrators since they are so very different people. This contributes to the reality of the story.

    Kirby Heyborne is Kel Keller. He gives an authentic portrayal of a confused teenager stumbling through life with no guidance and no moral compass. Kirby Heyborne earns praise for imparting what seem to me to be authentic inflections of a young boy who doesn't know how to think like a man.

    Keith Szarabajka is Arthur Opp. He gives a sensitive reading of the man who wants to be different but is pulled by his irresistible urges. Keith Szarabajka is so talented that he can give an authentic portrayal of not only an obese middlegaed man but also the young Latina housemaid Yolanda. His portions of the book steal the show, chiefly because he is doing the Arthur Opp sections which are the most engaging portions of the story.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Stainless Steel Rat

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By Harry Harrison
    • Narrated By Phil Gigante
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (938)
    Performance
    (727)
    Story
    (726)

    DiGriz is caught during one of his crimes and recruited into the Special Corps. Boring, routine desk work during his probationary period results in his discovering that someone is building a battleship, thinly disguised as an industrial vessel. In the peaceful League no one has battleships anymore, so the builder of this one would be unstoppable. DiGriz' hunt for the guilty becomes a personal battle between himself and the beautiful but deadly Angelina, who his planning a coup on one of the feudal worlds.

    SFF11C says: "Awesome"
    "…..Crime is a Matter of Degrees….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Master criminal Jim Degriz discovers that, even though crime does pay—very lucratively thank you—that his true calling is catching bad guys. This book is sarcastically witty and tongue-in-cheeky fun. It has a tight plot but that is not the attraction. Listen to this for the shear entertainment. I wish the book wasn't so short, but there are many more in this series. I will put them on my list.

    Phil Gigante works well with this material. He has a well-honed sense of smug sarcasm, and his character voicings are spot on and supremely entertaining.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Unwind

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 10 mins)
    • By Neal Shusterman
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    Overall
    (1011)
    Performance
    (862)
    Story
    (866)

    Conner's parents want to be rid of him because he's a troublemaker. Risa has no parents and is being unwound to cut orphanage costs. Lev's unwinding has been planned since his birth, as part of his family's strict religion. Brought together by chance, and kept together by desperation, these three unlikely companions make a harrowing cross-country journey, knowing their lives hang in the balance.

    SoCalBonnie says: "It won me over completely"
    "…..Put Humphrey Dumphy Back Together Again….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Entering into the political arena of the abortion debate, author Neal Shusterman offers a new twist: The opening sequence gives us the background information on this future political landscape where a compromise has been struck between the Pro-lifer and Pro-Choice factions. This compromise defines human life as beginning at conception and makes pre-birth abortion illegal, but provides for a chance to eliminate a child between the ages of 13 and 18 years. This may seem like a preposterous idea divorced from reality, but it does provide for a set of natural enemies between society and those slated for “harvest,” and gives justification for the characters to rebel and fight for their lives.

    This artificial tension reminds me of movies like The Hunger Games, Logan’s Run and even The Running Man. I am also reminded of another significant fictional entry into the abortion debate: Philip K. Dick wrote a short story called “The Pre-persons” where an abortion could be performed up until the age of 12 years old. This novel UNWIND represents a serious attempt to use speculative fiction to make a social statement. It is a novel with a strong plot line and a moral conscience.

    Luke Daniels presents the text with a solemn voice for the third person narration. He does offer good individual intonations making it easy to distinguish the different characters.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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