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Doug D. Eigsti

Increasing my ops tempo by allowing storytellers to whisper in my ear(buds).

Colorado Springs, Colorado United States | Member Since 2013

141
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 161 reviews
  • 171 ratings
  • 627 titles in library
  • 10 purchased in 2015
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FOLLOWERS
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  • Neuromancer

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By William Gibson
    • Narrated By Robertson Dean
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1498)
    Performance
    (1337)
    Story
    (1349)

    Twenty years ago, it was as if someone turned on a light. The future blazed into existence with each deliberate word that William Gibson laid down. The winner of Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards, Neuromancer didn't just explode onto the science fiction scene - it permeated into the collective consciousness, culture, science, and technology.Today, there is only one science fiction masterpiece to thank for the term "cyberpunk," for easing the way into the information age and Internet society.

    David says: "5 stars for coolness, 3 stars for give-a-heckness"
    "…I prefer situations to plans…"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book required two listenings for me; not that it is that difficult a book, just that I needed two tries to get myself plugged in to the literary and media gestalt that is audiobook listening. On the first pass I was evaluating it only on the level of the cool lingo and techno-noir dialog. Gibson’s terminology is so ripe that I wish I had a glossary to help me remember it all. If I could talk like his characters do I might even be cool. This is the way I first appraised it reading the paperback version years ago, and this is the only memory I had about the book. For me this book was seen as a sort of prose poem, the words were the thing. I just let them wash over my mind like a babbling brook over a moss covered rock. I never concerned myself with the story. It is the same way I engage with the movie Blade Runner: the visuals and the milieu are so convincing that I don’t mind that the story is thin. This was a mistake, for as cool as Gibson’s lingo is there is a story here. And, as I am intent on listening to the two sequels immediately after this, COUNT ZERO and MONA LISA OVERDRIVE, maybe, I thought, paying attention to what is going on in the first novel will enhance my enjoyment of the other books in the Sprawl series.

    It helps me to know that this is William Gibson’s first book. That explains some of the passages where the action is hard to follow and the characters not fully realized. It does not help me to understand how Gibson could conjure up such a holographic vision of the future. I always hate it when outsiders, looking into the realm of Science Fiction, keep a scorecard on the prognostications made by various writers, as if that was the purpose of writing SF: to predict the future. Sure Gibson manages to foresee the coming internet computer age. It was predictable; many others have done the same. No, Gibson’s contribution is in melding the obvious computer age with cool techno-crime operators and the noir street sub-culture, and giving the resulting mélange a vocabulary that at once defines the culture and allows no room to question its validity. Gibson’s cyber-land has many of the technological advances we are now experiencing, but our world is nothing like the Sprawl. In NEUROMANCER we are presented with the gritty underbelly of the clean-room silicon-enabled technological culture that sometimes seems indistinguishable from magic. The Sprawl is populated with the criminal element that naturally would opportunistically arise to take advantage of the weak links in the system. Organized crime is fascinating if for nothing else its ability to capitalize on the weakness in any system. That, I believe, is Gibson’s great contribution to SF. He has extrapolated the advances technology would make like any good SF writer, then layered that future with a culture that is nothing like the modern actual cyber-culture, but one that seems far more interesting and strange while all the while maintaining a sense of inevitability, almost as if it were a sort of alternate parallel universe. If this is his first book, let’s discover how much clearer his vision has improved in his subsequent works.

    The main reason I decided to listen to NEUROMANCER is that the two sequels are narrated by one of my favorites, Jonathan Davis and I wanted to review the first before tackling the others, having read it nearly twenty-five years ago. Robertson Dean’s reading of NEUROMANCER is conducive to appreciating the beautiful cyber-space prose in this novel. He has a wonderful somnambulistic voice; deeply intoned and well articulated, but with scant variation between the different characters. The female characters are particularly hard to make out sometimes. When this happens I know that I have not managed to fully see through the narrator and get inside the text. That is another reason I first approached this book on only the word level. His is not the most emotional rendering, but then the emotions of the book are below the surface level as well, so it is appropriate. On the second listening I decided to pay closer attention and extract all that I could from Dean’s voice. I still found myself drifting away from the plot unless I was able to focus on the story. But I did enjoy the second pass more than the first. Robertson Dean reminds me of another similar narrator, John Lee, who has a voice that I find so soothing that I tend to tune out the actual words and need to make an extra effort to stay tuned into the story. This audiobook can be experienced on purely the word level, but do strive to stay engaged to the plot; there’s a story in there somewhere.

    This presentation features an introduction by William Gibson written in 2004, and an excellent afterward titled “Some Dark Holler” by Jack Womack. Both help give historical context to this very influential novel.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Jack Weatherford
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis, Jack Weatherford
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4373)
    Performance
    (2885)
    Story
    (2909)

    The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in 25 years than the Romans did in 400. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization.

    Peter says: "Brilliant, insightful, intriguing."
    "…..The Civilized Savage….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It is amazing what Genghis Khan was able to accomplish from the steppes of Asia. The empire he established would eventually reign over all of what are now Chinese lands and extended to the realms of Europe. Most interesting was the high level of organization the great Khan instilled in his government without a dominant centralized capitol city. I found this to be an interesting historical account.

    Jonathan Davis is one of my favorite narrators. I found his effort here to be a bit slow-paced. Increasing the playback speed to 1.5X retained all the qualities needed to understand his voice and helped me retain my interest.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Never Give In!: The Best of Winston Churchill's Speeches

    • ORIGINAL (17 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Winston Churchill, Winston S. Churchill (compilation)
    • Narrated By Winston Churchill
    Overall
    (16)
    Performance
    (14)
    Story
    (15)

    Winston Churchill was the most eloquent and expressive statesman of his time. It was as an orator that Churchill became most completely alive, and it was through his oratory that his words made their greatest and most enduring impact. While the definitive collection of Churchill's speeches fills eight volumes, here for the first time, his grandson, Winston S. Churchill, has put together a personal selection of his favorite speeches in a single, indispensable volume.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "…..Churchill Was the Anti-Nahzee….."
    "…..Churchill Was the Anti-Nahzee….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Winston Churchill is a towering figure in the history of the twentieth century, and a master of the English language. I recommend that you listen to the three volume, 132 hour-long, biography by William Manchester (vol. 3 with Paul Reid)— titled collectively, The Last Lion—in order to get a picture of the man Churchill before delving into his voice in these speeches.

    Churchill has been called a great orator, and that is certainly true, but this not because he possessed a Stentorian voice, or even great talent of diction. On the contrary, his voice is almost comically wispy and his annunciation is often muddled. He had a slight speech impediment that brings to mind Elmer Fudd when you hear him speak. The monumental force of his will, his penetrating mind, and his razor sharp wit combined to force him into the public forum. He knew that he had to become a great public speaker and set out to achieve that goal with his typical purpose and drive. Reading his biography we learn that he had to overcome his fear of public speaking with designed determination. He spoke from notes, and not just from a brief hand-written outline: He had his speeches typed out in what his staff called “Psalm form.” By this they meant that each line was printed on a separate line, like a poem. He made notes on inserting effective pauses, on where to raise his voice, and where to pound the podium. Just like he overcame his weak body to become a star on the Polo field, overcame a learning disability to become a scholar, in like fashion he overcame his natural limitations, in diction and forcefulness of voice, to become the great public speaker that he knew he needed to become in order to motivate men to undertake the terrible task of fighting the forces of evil in this modern world.

    I thought I had a good grasp of the period of history and Chuchill’s place within it from reading his biography and his Memoirs. But listening to him speak lifted this history off of the page and made it real. He made it a point of mocking Hitler by consistently calling him “the Corporal” and purposefully mispronouncing “Nazi” as Nahzee. I have read of these disparaging tactics employed by Churchill but hearing them has forever cemented it in my mind. It is remarkable how spectacular it must have been to witness these events as they unfolded. Hearing Winston Churchill recount the progress of the war gave me a much better understanding of the mood and the times of the Second World War.

    Technical Notes:
    This production is billed at a 17:16 package. At about the 10 hour mark I noticed that the speeches were being repeated. For example: At time marker 2:25 there is a speech called “Broadcast from London to the United States,” which begins, “Alexander the Great remarked that the people of Asia were slaves because they had not learned to pronounce the word ‘no.’” This same speech is repeated at the 10:04 mark. From the ten hour point onward many, if not all, the speeches are duplicated. I skipped from chapter to chapter and noticed that up to the ten hour mark the speeches were in chronological order; taking the reader from the years leading up to WWII to the time of the surrender of Germany. After the ten-hour mark this production returns to the year 1939 and the speeches are duplicated.

    These are vintage recordings of speeches and readings from Churchill himself and the clarity of the recording is expectedly not up to modern standards. The words of Winston Churchill set their own high standard; one that no orator utilizing all the advanced technology nowadays can hope to equal.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Raven

    • UNABRIDGED (8 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe
    • Narrated By Anthony Donovan
    Overall
    (7)
    Performance
    (6)
    Story
    (6)

    This is a story from the Chilling Ghost Stories collection. The Raven, by Edgar Allan Poe, tells of a talking raven's mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man's slow fall into madness. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "…..Hannibal Lector Quoth ‘Nevermore’….."
    "…..Hannibal Lector Quoth ‘Nevermore’….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The first thing that struck me is that the voice of the narrator Anthony Donovan sounds to my ear to be identical to that of Sir Anthony Hopkins. So, while listening, I automatically imagined Hannibal Lector reading aloud from a small tattered volume of The Collected Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe while in his cell, nibbling on some fava beans. This adds to the unease this poem naturally evokes. This is a fine version of this most wonderful poem.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Raven and Selected Short Stories

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe
    • Narrated By Stefan Rudnicki, Bronson Pinchot
    Overall
    (24)
    Performance
    (20)
    Story
    (20)

    The title work in this collection of ten short stories and poems is widely regarded as the most famous of Edgar Allan Poe’s writings. This unsettling tale in verse tells of a man’s slow descent into madness as he mourns the loss of his lover. The mysterious visit of a talking raven that utters only one word sparks the man’s steady decline.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Sedate Rendition of Growing Madness"
    "Sedate Rendition of Growing Madness"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Having just completed my listening excursion into Poe with Christopher Aruffo’s masterful thirteen volume Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection, I longed to hear another interpretation. And, being a fan of the narration of Bronson Pinchot, I was anxious to discover his interpretation of the fantastic tales of Mr. Poe. What I discovered is a competent, if uninspired rendition of these tales of terror and insanity. I realize that the slow descent into insanity, typical of Poe’s tales, is appropriately related in a calm and sane voice, at first, then becoming increasingly anxious as the character’s underlying lunacy is progressively revealed. Pinchot and Rudniki do this expertly. What I was looking for, however, was an over-the-top melodramatic performance; that I did not find. True, there are brief moments of hysteria in the narration such as Pinchot screaming in Rodderick Usher’s voice, “Madman, I tell you that she now stands without the door!” This brief example dramatic acting-out was what I hoping for. Alas, it is only extant in a few places in this collection. This is a fine production of these classic Poe stories. The sound quality is clean and resonant. Both of the narrators are a pleasure to listen to. So, if you want a faithful respectable reading of Edgar Allan Poe, you will not be disappointed. My search for a crazed maniacal unhinged frenetic portrayal of derangement continues. I think Poe deserves at least one such performance, don’t you?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection 11-13: The Tell-Tale Heart and Other Stories

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Includes: "The Tell-Tale Heart": The unceasing pulse of a mysterious heart drives a man to both madness and murder. "Man of the Crowd": Through the dark streets of London, a man is compelled into relentless pursuit of a mysterious figure. "Hop-Frog": A misshapen jester enlivens the king's masquerade ball in a most unexpected manner. "Metzengerstein": The savage Baron Metzengerstein is obsessed with a monstrous and unaccountable horse. And six more classic tales of horror!

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection 10: Deus ex Machina

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Christopher Aruffo, Edgar Allan Poe
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    From the spiritual to the mechanical, Deus Et Machina gathers many never-recorded stories and essays by Edgar Allan Poe. Included: The Facts In The Case Of M. Valdemar: By the power of a mesmeric spell, an invalid's soul is trapped at the exact moment of death. Von Kempelen and His Discovery: The legendary formula-- pursued by alchemists throughout the ages-- will finally be secret no more.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook: Collection 9: The Pioneers

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe, Christopher Aruffo
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    Travel with Poe across the vast Atlantic, to the wild uncharted regions of the Americas, and even to the moon!

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection 6-8: The Cask of Amontillado and Other Stories

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe, Christopher Aruffo
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    This audiobook collection contains a selection of eight short stories by Edgar Allan Poe, one of the most influential authors in American literature.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection 5: Eureka

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe, Christopher Aruffo
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Poe's masterpiece of cosmology unites the laws of Nature with the infinite Universe - to its Creation, its Material and Spiritual Essence, and its ultimate Destiny. At once thoughtful, heretical, and beautiful, the author himself proclaims Eureka as his life's greatest achievement.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Poe on Poetry: Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection, Volume 4

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe, Christopher Aruffo
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    The author reveals his craft in the structure of story, the creation of Beauty, the role of the critic, and the mechanics of verse - including a complete, step-by-step explanation of how he wrote his most famous poem, The Raven.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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